KTXS-TV
A black rounded box with the letters K T X S, the K larger than the T X S, in a Didone serif. Beneath is a half-blue, half-red box containing a numeral 12 in the same typeface. The ABC network logo overlaps this box on the lower-right side.
The CW network logo with Abilene above it, right-aligned
CitySweetwater, Texas
Channels
Branding
  • KTXS (pronounced "K-Texas")
  • The CW Abilene (on DT2)
Programming
Affiliations
Ownership
Owner
KTES-LD
History
First air date
January 30, 1956 (68 years ago) (1956-01-30)
Former call signs
KPAR-TV (1956–1966)
Former channel number(s)
Analog: 12 (VHF, 1956–2009)
  • CBS (1956–1979)
  • ABC (secondary, 1956–1979)
Call sign meaning
Texas
Technical information[1]
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID308
ERP710 kW
HAAT439.3 m (1,441 ft)
Transmitter coordinates32°24′48.4″N 100°6′26.3″W / 32.413444°N 100.107306°W / 32.413444; -100.107306
Links
Public license information
Websitektxs.com
Satellite station
KTXE-LD
The ABC logo lower left, overlapping a red rounded box with white trim containing a white numeral 38
The CW network logo with San Angelo above it, right-aligned
Channels
Branding
  • ABC 38
  • The CW San Angelo (on DT2)
Programming
Affiliations
  • 12.1: ABC
  • 12.2: CW+
Ownership
Owner
  • Sinclair Broadcast Group
  • (Sinclair Media Licensee, LLC)
History
First air date
July 19, 1971 (52 years ago) (1971-07-19)
Former call signs
  • K55AA (1971–1997)
  • KTXE-LP (1997–2014)
Former channel number(s)
  • Analog: 55 (UHF, 1971–1997), 38 (UHF, 1997–2014)
  • Digital: 38 (UHF, 2014–2021)
Call sign meaning
Disambiguation of KTXS
Technical information[2]
Facility ID309
ClassLD
ERP15 kW
HAAT108.2 m (355 ft)
Transmitter coordinates31°29′6″N 100°27′27″W / 31.48500°N 100.45750°W / 31.48500; -100.45750
Links
Public license information
LMS

KTXS-TV (channel 12) is a television station licensed to Sweetwater, Texas, United States, serving the Abilene area as an affiliate of ABC and The CW Plus. It is owned by Sinclair Broadcast Group alongside KTES-LD (channel 40), broadcasting TBD, and KTXE-LD, which rebroadcasts KTXS-TV in the San Angelo area. The stations share studios on North Clack Street in Abilene; KTXS-TV's transmitter is located near Trent, Texas, and KTXE-LD is broadcast from a site on West 26th Street in San Angelo.

Channel 12 began broadcasting on January 30, 1956, as KPAR-TV, which was owned by and rebroadcast most of the programming of KDUB-TV, the CBS affiliate in Lubbock. Texas Key Broadcasting assumed operational control in 1960; the station added ABC affiliation and broke away from the Lubbock station, and the station moved its transmitter to Trent to increase coverage.

Grayson Enterprises bought KPAR-TV in 1966 and immediately changed the call sign to KTXS-TV. It built the present Abilene-area studios, which replaced facilities in Sweetwater and led to fines and a hearing by the Federal Communications Commission; the station also built the San Angelo translator at this time. As a result of multiple indiscretions, Grayson divested itself of KTXS-TV and other stations in "distress sales" to minority-controlled broadcasters in 1980. KTXS had four owners in a six-year period, all of whom tried to raise the station from a distant last place in news ratings.

Lamco Communications purchased KTXS in 1986 and raised its news department to a more competitive second place in the Abilene market. KTXS provided the local outlet of Telemundo from 2000 to 2010 and added The CW in 2006. It was purchased by Sinclair as part of its 2017 acquisition of Bonten Media Group.

History

KPAR-TV: Early years

Texas Telecasting, Inc., the owner of KDUB-TV in Lubbock, filed with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on June 29, 1953, to build a new TV station on channel 12 in Sweetwater[3] as well as a station at Big Spring.[4] The FCC approved the Sweetwater application on August 26,[3] and Texas Telecasting revealed its plans for the station, which would mostly rebroadcast KDUB-TV and its CBS programs.[5]

Construction on KPAR-TV began in September 1955, after KDUB-TV received new equipment; items previously used in Lubbock would be transferred to the new Sweetwater station.[6] The tower was erected in January 1956,[7] and KPAR-TV began broadcasting on January 30, 1956, with a three-hour dedication broadcast from its studio in Sweetwater.[8] The station also briefly affiliated with the NTA Film Network, which began in September 1956.[9] In 1958, the station opened a second studio in downtown Abilene.[10]

In 1960, Texas Telecasting filed to lease KPAR-TV to Texas Key Broadcasting in a 10-year, nearly $800,000 agreement. Texas Key was owned by residents of Abilene including the station's general manager, James M. Isaacs.[11] The new operators filed to move the station's transmitter to a site south of Trent in 1961; the higher elevation would improve coverage in the Abilene market.[12] Texas Key bought the physical assets of KPAR-TV, as well as KDUB radio and television in Lubbock and KEDY-TV in Big Spring, in 1961.[13]

The new transmitter and 568-foot (173 m) tower at Trent were activated on February 1, 1962, by which time the station had added ABC programs to its schedule.[14] Texas Key sued the Lubbock TV station, which had become KLBK-TV, and its new corporate parent Grayson Enterprises in 1964 for failing to maintain the microwave transmission system that brought CBS programs from Lubbock to KPAR-TV, forcing channel 12 to contract for its own network feed from CBS.[15]

KTXS-TV: Grayson Enterprises ownership

Grayson Enterprises agreed to buy KPAR-TV from Texas Key Telecasting in January 1966; part of the sale agreement stipulated the abandonment of the microwave system lawsuit.[16] The $625,000 sale was completed on June 23, and on July 1, the station changed its call sign to KTXS-TV ("K-Texas TV"). Grayson promised to reactivate the Sweetwater studio, which had been previously shuttered, and add new video tape and color equipment.[17][18]

Grayson invested in two translators to expand KTXS-TV's reach. In 1969, it received approval to build a rebroadcaster at Brownwood.[19] Two years later, on July 19, 1971, KTXS-TV installed translator K55AA in San Angelo, bringing that city the previously unseen ABC network; CBS programs were blacked out to protect KCTV there.[20] In addition to providing ABC to San Angelo, the move derailed plans by SRC, Inc., to construct a new local station affiliated with the network.[21]

The operation of Grayson's Texas stations came into question by the FCC as early as 1971, when the commission fined KTXS-TV $5,000 for moving its studio from Sweetwater to Abilene. It defended the move as necessary to compete with KRBC-TV, the only Abilene station at the time, which told the FCC that much of the operation had been relocated anyway.[22] In 1977, the FCC designated the licenses of all four Grayson stations, including KTXS-TV, for hearing. Two of the charges specifically concerned channel 12: the commission sought to ascertain whether Grayson lacked candor in its communications about the Abilene studio move, and the FCC cited the station as having engaged in the practice of "clipping", or running local commercials over network material.[23][24] Grayson got a new way out of the hearings after the commission introduced the "distress sale" policy, which permitted a station facing possible revocation of its broadcast license to be sold a group that was minority-controlled. The sale had to be made at a price substantially below the station's market value.[25] Grayson was given time to find qualified buyers for its four TV stations.[26]

While Grayson searched for a buyer, an ice storm collapsed the KTXS-TV tower at Trent, by this point 1,000 feet (300 m) high, on January 1, 1979. The top 650 feet (200 m) separated and landed on the adjacent transmitter building, damaging the roof.[27][28] In time to air the 1978 NFC Championship Game, KTXS-TV returned to the air on January 12, broadcasting from an antenna attached to the remaining 300 feet (91 m) of the mast.[29] The replacement tower was completed in January 1980.[30] Also during this time, a third Abilene station, KTAB-TV (channel 32), was authorized and took the CBS affiliation, leaving KTXS-TV a sole ABC affiliate;[31] by that time, channel 12 was already mostly airing ABC programming.[32]

Carousel of owners

In April 1979, Grayson agreed to sell KTXS-TV and KLBK-TV to Silver Star Communications, a majority-Black partnership soon renamed Prima Inc., for $15 million.[33][34] The Black owners in Prima were Wayne Embry, a former professional basketball player; and John Robert Lee, assistant athletic director at the University of Wisconsin; and Larry Reed, a basketball coach at the same university.[33] Charles Woods later became an investor in the company.[35] The sale process dragged out due to protests by another group that sought to purchase the stations, led by former congresswoman Barbara Jordan, and wanted clarity as to the then-new distress sale policy.[36] During this time, Grayson's principal creditor, the Mercantile National Bank of Dallas, threatened foreclosure.[37] The FCC rebuffed the objections in March and April 1980, upholding the distress sale to Prima.[38][39] Final closure of the deal came three months later after several delays.[40]

Prima set up its corporate office in Abilene and announced plans to expand the news staff and purchase new equipment.[41] The firm showed signs of financial weakness in 1982. Former shareholders in Grayson Enterprises sued the company for $1.18 million, alleging non-payment on the note that financed the transactions,[42] and in March 1983, syndicator Lorimar Productions sued for breach of contract.[43]

Catclaw Communications, an Abilene-based company led by S. M. Moore, purchased KTXS-TV in 1983 from Prima.[35][44] Two years later, SouthWest MultiMedia of Houston purchased the station from Catclaw.[45]

Lamco ownership

SouthWest MultiMedia, just over a year after agreeing to purchase KTXS-TV, sold it to Lamco Communications of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1986.[46] KTXS briefly aired Fox programs in late-night hours on Saturdays from September 1990 to February 1991, when a translator of San Angelo Fox affiliate KIDY opened in Abilene.[47][48]

In 2000, Lamco acquired the former K40DX, a low-power Telemundo station started by the network in 1995,[49] and renamed it KTES-LP, with Spanish-language local news briefs produced by the KTXS news department.[50]

Lamco put its stations on the market in 2003. After a deal with Larry Wilson, a former Citadel Broadcasting executive, fell through,[51][52] the Lamco portfolio was sold to BlueStone Television, a company led by Sandy DiPasquale, in 2004.[53][54] The CW was added on a subchannel in 2006.[55]

The BlueStone stations were sold in 2007 to Bonten Media Group, led by former Emmis Communications station group president Randy Bongarten, for $230 million.[56] Bonten discontinued the Telemundo feed and replaced it with This TV in 2010 in response to low ratings, especially compared to The CW.[55] Sinclair Broadcast Group acquired the Bonten portfolio in 2017 for $240 million.[57][58]

News operation

KTXS-TV was traditionally the last-place news outlet in Abilene, even when the market only had two local stations. KRBC-TV commanded viewer loyalty with ratings shares as high as 80 percent. After KTAB-TV signed on in 1979, it supplanted KRBC as the number-one station, but KTXS remained a distant third, with its evening newscasts drawing 12 to 15% of the Abilene-market audience.[59] Successive owners of channel 12 attempted with little success to improve the ratings by making changes to the newscasts.[60] When Prima acquired KTXS, its vice president assessed that "KTXS has not been doing what it should have been doing in news", and the new news director called the existing news product "a joke".[61]

A short upturn in ratings began in 1985, during Catclaw Communications ownership, with increases of 20 to 40% in news audience and a growing viewership among adults 18–49 even as ABC's prime time ratings slumped.[62] Catclaw had hired Len Johnson, a longtime radio newsman for KRBC, because owner S. M. Moore wanted to remedy the news image of having inexperienced reporters and anchor and bring in someone with "gray around the temples".[63] He was replaced as main anchor in early 1985 with Pat Brown, under whom the ratings increases began.[64][62] The momentum was soon lost, and KTXS fell further back of KRBC.[65]

During the 1990s and 2000s, the station's ratings for news increased. By 1995, KTXS had pulled ahead of KRBC at 6 and 10 p.m.,[66] and in February 1999 it swept the ratings, knocking KTAB-TV out of first place.[67] KTAB quickly retook first place in those time periods, but KTXS had increased its margin on KRBC;[68] its newscasts continued to reach a younger audience desired by advertisers; and it led in the 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. slots.[69]

As of 2023, the station produces 19+12 hours a week of local news and a weekly sports show, KTXS Sports Sunday.[70]

Technical information

Subchannels

The stations' signals are multiplexed:

Subchannels of KTXS-TV[71]
Channel Res. Aspect Short name Programming
12.1 720p 16:9 KTXS ABC
12.2 CW The CW Plus
12.3 480i TBD TBD (KTES-LD 40.1)
  Simulcast of subchannels of another station
Subchannels of KTXE-LD[72]
Channel Res. Aspect Short name Programming
12.1 720p 16:9 KTXE ABC
12.2 CW The CW Plus

Analog-to-digital conversion

KTXS-TV began providing a digital signal in September 2002, making it the first Big Country television station to broadcast in digital.[73] It shut down its analog signal, over VHF channel 12, on June 12, 2009, the official date on which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 20, using virtual channel 12.[74]

References

  1. ^ "Facility Technical Data for KTXS-TV". Licensing and Management System. Federal Communications Commission.
  2. ^ "Facility Technical Data for KTXE-LD". Licensing and Management System. Federal Communications Commission.
  3. ^ a b "History Cards for KTXS-TV". Federal Communications Commission. Archived from the original on December 9, 2022. Retrieved February 18, 2024.
  4. ^ "2 Texas TV Requests". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Fort Worth, Texas. Associated Press. July 8, 1953. p. 11. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Sweetwater Gets Relay TV Station". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. August 29, 1953. p. 1B. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "S'water Due TV Station". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. September 2, 1955. p. 1B. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Sweetwater TV Tower Going Up". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. January 9, 1956. p. 3-B. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Hobgood, Martha (January 31, 1956). "Sweetwater TV Station Takes Air". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "104 Sign Up For NTA Film Network, Due to Begin Operations on Oct. 15" (PDF). Broadcasting. September 17, 1956. pp. 56, 58. ProQuest 1285731096. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 18, 2023. Retrieved February 18, 2024.
  10. ^ Reed, Jerry (April 19, 1981). "TV: a 28-Year West Texas Marvel". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. Centennial 59. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Carpenter, Leslie (October 12, 1960). "Abilenians Seeks KPAR-TV Lease". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1-A, 4-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "KPAR Wants Tower Moved Near Trent". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. April 11, 1961. p. 1-A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ Carpenter, Leslie (June 30, 1961). "For TV Interests: $4-Million-Plus Paid Dub Rogers". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 9-B. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "KPAR Goes to 'Full Power' With New Tower at Trent". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. February 1, 1962. p. 1-B. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Transfer of Trial Between TV Firms Rejected by Judge". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. September 5, 1964. p. 14-A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Lubbock Station Buys KPAR-TV". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. January 11, 1966. p. 1-A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "$625,000 Turns KPAR Into KTXS". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. June 24, 1966. p. 3-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Call Letters Change Today: 'K-Texas TV' New Sound For Channel 12 Station". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. July 1, 1966. p. 12-C. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Brownwood Application Passes FCC". The Austin American. Austin, Texas. Associated Press. November 23, 1969. p. B2. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "UHF Television Slated For Angelo". San Angelo Standard-Times. San Angelo, Texas. July 16, 1971. p. 12A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "For San Angelo School System: Educational TV a possibility". San Angelo Standard-Times. San Angelo, Texas. April 21, 1971. p. 13A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Fines befall two". Broadcasting. June 7, 1971. p. 9. ProQuest 1016854446.
  23. ^ Fulton, Loretta (August 11, 1977). "FCC Hearing Set Involving KTXS". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1A, 8A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ Kever, Jeannie (May 16, 1978). "West Texas TV Hearings Slated". San Angelo Standard-Times. San Angelo, Texas. pp. 1A, 12A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "'Distress sale' of WAEO-TV first approved by FCC". The Hollywood Reporter. April 25, 1979. p. 8. ProQuest 2471833446.
  26. ^ "Hearing deferred on challenge to cable television". The Odessa American. Odessa, Texas. November 1, 1978. p. 5D. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "KTXS transmitting tower falls". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. January 2, 1979. p. 1A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ Minutaglio, Bill (January 5, 1979). "Repair of Towers Makes KTXS Play Wait-See". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1A, 8A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "KTXS returned to air for NFC title clash". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. January 8, 1979. p. 10-A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "KTXS-TV Says, "Thank You! Big Country For Your Patience And Understanding!"". Abilene Reporter-News (Advertisement). Abilene, Texas. January 13, 1980. p. 13-A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "TV station to start in fall". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. March 28, 1979. pp. 1A, 10A. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ Wienandt, Chris (September 23, 1979). "Federal, Murphy's Laws Slow New TV Station". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 7-B. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ a b Whitaker, William (May 2, 1979). "3 of KTXS Owners In Town to Discuss Ideas". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 8A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ Whitaker, William (July 11, 1979). "KTXS May Be in Prima Hands". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 10A. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ a b "KTXS being bought by Abilenians". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. March 8, 1983. p. 1A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ DuPont, Michael (July 13, 1979). "Austin Group Trying to Halt KTXS Sale". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 9-D. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "KTXS, Other Stations May Face Foreclosure". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. February 27, 1980. pp. 1A, 14A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Monahans TV station included in distress sale of 12 others". The Odessa American. Odessa, Texas. Associated Press. March 29, 1980. p. 3C. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "FCC Upholds KTXS 'Distress Sale' to Prima". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. Associated Press. April 11, 1980. p. 8A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "KTXS Owners Get OK". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. July 18, 1980. p. 2-D. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ Whitaker, William (April 17, 1980). "KTXS firm moving HQ to Abilene". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1A, 14A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ "Former KTXS-TV owners file $1.18 million lawsuit". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. July 8, 1982. p. 7-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ Jones, Roy A. II (March 12, 1983). "Suit Filed Against KTXS Owner". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 3-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "Sale of TV station approved". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Fort Worth, Texas. August 26, 1983. p. 13A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "Houston firm to buy KTXS". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. September 13, 1985. pp. 1A, 18A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ Bargainer, Judy (October 14, 1986). "KTXS sold to Pennsylvania firm". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 5A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ Lapham, Bob (September 13, 1990). "Fox gains foothold; no Emmy show". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1D, 3D. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  48. ^ Lapham, Bob (February 14, 1991). "Fox finally shows up". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 3D. Archived from the original on February 18, 2024. Retrieved February 18, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ Miles, Laureen (May 8, 1995). "Freedom rings for ABC". Mediaweek. p. 28. ProQuest 213632575.
  50. ^ "KTES to broadcast local news in Spanish". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. August 16, 2000. pp. 1AA, 2AA. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ DeJesus, Thaddeus (July 17, 2003). "TV stations KTXS, KTES to be sold". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1E. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  52. ^ Murphy, Brien (September 6, 2003). "KTXS, KTES sale off". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1B. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  53. ^ Murphy, Brien (January 16, 2004). "BlueStone buys area TV stations". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1D. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  54. ^ Murphy, Brien (June 17, 2004). "BlueStone Television cleared to buy KTXS". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1E. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ a b Adame, Jaime (August 27, 2010). "Telemundo giving way to This TV in Abilene". Abilene Reporter-News. Archived from the original on August 29, 2010. Retrieved September 5, 2010.
  56. ^ Levith, Will (November 20, 2006). "Bongarten, Diamond Buy Bluestone TV". Mediaweek. p. 18.
  57. ^ "Sinclair Buying Bonten Stations For $240M". TVNewsCheck. April 21, 2017. Archived from the original on August 9, 2018. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  58. ^ Eggerton, John (June 30, 2017). "FCC Approves Sinclair-Bonten Deal". Broadcasting & Cable. Archived from the original on January 2, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024.
  59. ^ Rux, Connie (February 21, 1984). "The Ratings Game: Stations Rely on Programming While Courting Advertisers". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1B. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  60. ^ Pratt, Andrew (June 2, 1985). "Vying for Viewers: Ratings game is played for keeps". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1D, 4D. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  61. ^ Lerner, Preston (December 10, 1980). "Corpus Newsman To Replace Izzard". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 14-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  62. ^ a b Williamson, Doug (September 14, 1985). "Proposed sale of KTXS-TV comes as ratings climbing". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 3-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  63. ^ "KTXS Names New Anchorman". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. August 26, 1983. p. 2-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  64. ^ "Johnson to become managing editor of KTXS". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. January 25, 1985. p. 3-A. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  65. ^ Lapham, Bob (April 6, 1988). "The 'sweeps': KTAB still is No. 1 but KRBC moves up". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1B, 2B. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  66. ^ Lapham, Bob (April 2, 1995). "KTAB does well in ratings; KTXS reaps media awards". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 2C. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  67. ^ Lapham, Bob (April 1, 1999). "KTXS leads way as local news viewership increases". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 2B. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  68. ^ Murphy, Brien (January 8, 2003). "Ratings race: ABC, KTXS edge KTAB in Nielsens". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. pp. 1E, 4E. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  69. ^ Wellborn, Dub (May 4, 2003). "What we watched on TV". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 2E. Archived from the original on December 9, 2023. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  70. ^ "Fourth Quarter 2023 Public Issues and Programs Lists" (PDF). Public Inspection File. Federal Communications Commission. January 8, 2024. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024.
  71. ^ "TV Query for KTXS". RabbitEars. Archived from the original on November 9, 2018. Retrieved February 19, 2024.
  72. ^ "TV Query for KTXE-LD". RabbitEars. Archived from the original on November 9, 2018. Retrieved February 19, 2024.
  73. ^ Murphy, Brien (September 28, 2002). "KTXS-TV first area station to go digital". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. p. 1D. Archived from the original on February 19, 2024. Retrieved February 19, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  74. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and Second Rounds" (PDF). Federal Communications Commission. May 23, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 29, 2013. Retrieved August 29, 2021.