6-MeO-THH
6-MeO-THH structure.svg
Identifiers
  • 6-Methoxy-1-methyl-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC13H16N2O
Molar mass216.284 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
Melting point152–155 °C (306–311 °F)
  • CC1NCCC2=C1NC(C=C3)=C2C=C3OC
  • InChI=1S/C13H16N2O/c1-8-13-10(5-6-14-8)11-7-9(16-2)3-4-12(11)15-13/h3-4,7-8,14-15H,5-6H2,1-2H3 checkY
  • Key:RDUORFDQRFHYBF-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

6-MeO-THH, or 6-methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroharman, is a β-carboline (or more specifically a pinoline) derivative and a structural isomer of tetrahydroharmine (7-MeO-THH). 6-MeO-THH is mentioned in Alexander Shulgin's book TiHKAL (Tryptamines I Have Known and Loved), stating that 6-MeO-THH is very similar to the other carbolines.[1] Limited testing suggests that it possesses mild psychoactive effects at 1.5 mg/kg and is said to be about one-third as potent as 6-methoxyharmalan.[2] It has been isolated from certain plants of the Virola family.

Pharmacology

Very little is known about the psychoactivity of 6-MeO-THH in humans. Studies in rats have shown it to bind to a number of serotonin 5-HT1 receptors and 5-HT2 receptors, dopamine D2 receptors, benzodiazepine receptors, and imidazoline receptors.[2][3][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Shulgin A, Shulgin A (September 1997). TiHKAL: The Continuation. Berkeley, California: Transform Press. p. 425. ISBN 0-9630096-9-9. OCLC 38503252.
  2. ^ a b Grella B, Dukat M, Young R, Teitler M, Herrick-Davis K, Gauthier CB, Glennon RA (April 1998). "Investigation of hallucinogenic and related beta-carbolines". Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 50 (2): 99–107. doi:10.1016/S0376-8716(97)00163-4. PMID 9649961.
  3. ^ Glennon RA, Dukat M, Grella B, Hong S, Costantino L, Teitler M, et al. (August 2000). "Binding of beta-carbolines and related agents at serotonin (5-HT(2) and 5-HT(1A)), dopamine (D(2)) and benzodiazepine receptors". Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 60 (2): 121–32. doi:10.1016/S0376-8716(99)00148-9. PMID 10940539.
  4. ^ Husbands SM, Glennon RA, Gorgerat S, Gough R, Tyacke R, Crosby J, et al. (October 2001). "beta-carboline binding to imidazoline receptors". Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 64 (2): 203–8. doi:10.1016/S0376-8716(01)00123-5. PMID 11543990.