Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
Seal of the Commander of the United States Fleet Forces Command.png
Seal of the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
Flag of a United States Navy admiral.svg
Flag of a U.S. Navy four-star admiral
Admiral Daryl L. Caudle (U.S. Fleet Forces Command).jpg
Incumbent
Admiral Daryl L. Caudle

since December 7, 2021
United States Fleet Forces Command
AbbreviationCOMUSFF
COMFLTFORCOM
Reports to
SeatNaval Support Activity Hampton Roads, Virginia, U.S.
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Term length2–3 years
(approx.)
Formation
  • January 1, 1906 (as Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet)
  • May 22, 2006 (as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command)
First holderRADM Robley D. Evans
DeputyDeputy Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
Websitewww.usff.navy.mil

Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (COMUSFF/COMFLTFORCOM) is the title of the United States Navy officer who serves as the commanding officer of the United States Fleet Forces Command. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command was originally established in 1905 as the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and as a two-star rear admiral's billet;[1] the position has been held by a four-star admiral since March 10, 1915.[1] The 45th, and current, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command is Admiral Daryl L. Caudle.

Title's history

Outgoing commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Admiral John B. Nathman is piped aboard during the 2007 U.S. Fleet Forces Command change of command ceremony on May 17, 2007.
Outgoing commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Admiral John B. Nathman is piped aboard during the 2007 U.S. Fleet Forces Command change of command ceremony on May 17, 2007.

The first Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet was Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, who assumed command on January 1, 1906 aboard his flagship the battleship USS Maine (BB-10).[1]

The title, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, was continuously used from 1906 until 1923 and again from 1941 to 2002.[1] In a reorganization of the United States Fleet in 1923, that title was abolished and the title Commander Scouting Force was used.[1] On February 1, 1941, General Order 143 reestablished the title and reorganized the United States Fleet into three separate fleets: the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, the U.S. Pacific Fleet and the U.S. Asiatic Fleet.[1] The order further stated each fleet would be under the command of a four-star admiral.[1] Thus, on February 1, 1941, Rear Admiral Ernest J. King, in his flagship USS Texas (BB-35) at Culebra, Puerto Rico, hauled down his two-star flag and hoisted his four-star flag as Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.[1]

After the end of World War II, the organization of the United States armed forces was reviewed with a view toward reorganization after the turbulent war years.[1] On December 1, 1947, under a reorganization act of the armed forces approved by Congress, the unified combatant command, United States Atlantic Command, was established with headquarters co-located to those of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet.[1] Admiral William H.P. Blandy was given the dual-hatted command of both U.S. Atlantic Fleet and U.S. Atlantic Command thus becoming the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet and the first Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command.[1] The two titles remained linked until another reorganization of the armed forces, via the Goldwater-Nichols Act in 1985, separated the U.S. Atlantic Command from the U.S. Atlantic Fleet.[1]

Admiral William E. Gortney (right) relieves Admiral John C. Harvey Jr. (center, face obscured) as commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, September 16, 2012.
Admiral William E. Gortney (right) relieves Admiral John C. Harvey Jr. (center, face obscured) as commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, September 16, 2012.

In the early 1950s, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) decided to establish a new major command, Allied Command Atlantic, under the command of a U.S. four-star admiral with headquarters in Norfolk, VA.[1] Since this was primarily a naval command responsible for allied defense of the North Atlantic, the decision was made to co-locate this organization with that of the U.S. Atlantic Command and U.S. Atlantic Fleet, to form a triple-hatted command.[1] On April 10, 1952, Admiral Lynde D. McCormick, the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command and U.S. Atlantic Fleet, assumed the additional title as the first Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic.[1] Like the U.S. Atlantic Command, the Allied Command Atlantic remained intact and part of a triple-hatted command organization until the Goldwater-Nichols Act occurred in 1985.[1] The Goldwater-Nichols Act separated command of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet from the other two commands giving the U.S. Atlantic Fleet its own four-star admiral.[1] Admiral Wesley L. McDonald was the last U.S. Navy admiral to command all three organizations at the same time.[1] He relinquished command of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet to Admiral Carlisle A. H. Trost on October 4, 1985.[1]

However, under the Goldwater-Nichols Act, the admiral filling the post of Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, would also serve as the Deputy Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command.[1] This role for CINCLANTFLT continued until 1986 when the Secretary of Defense approved a separate billet for the Deputy Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command.[1] On September 16, 1986, Admiral Frank B. Kelso II relinquished the Deputy USCINCLANT post to Major General Thomas G. Darling, USAF.[1]

Attendants render a collective salute at the 2021 U.S. Fleet Forces Command change of command ceremony, December 7, 2021.
Attendants render a collective salute at the 2021 U.S. Fleet Forces Command change of command ceremony, December 7, 2021.

On October 1, 2001, the Chief of Naval Operations designated the CINCLANTFLT to concurrently serve as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command.[1] U.S. Fleet Forces Command became responsible for overall coordination, establishment, and implementation of integrated requirements and policies for manning, equipping, and training Atlantic and Pacific Fleet units during the inter-deployment training cycle.[1]

On October 24, 2002, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld directed that the title of "Commander-in-Chief" be reserved solely for the President of the United States.[1] In a message to Naval Commanders-in-Chief, the Chief of Naval Operations directed a change of title to that of "Commander."[1] This change affected the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and U.S. Naval Forces Europe thus renaming Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet to Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.[1]

On May 23, 2006, the Chief of Naval Operations ordered the assimilation of U.S. Atlantic Fleet into U.S. Fleet Forces Command and that the dual-hatted position be integrated to its current title of Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command.[1]

On October 31, 2006, a ceremony was held to officially mark the transition of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and U.S. Fleet Forces Command to just U.S. Fleet Forces Command.[1] Three of the 37 previous admirals who held the top post in the Atlantic fleet attended the ceremony, which was held aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71).[1]

Appointment

The Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command is nominated by the President for appointment from any eligible officers holding the rank of rear admiral (lower half) or above,[2] who also meets the requirements for the position, under the advice and/or recommendation of the Secretary of the Navy, the Chief of Naval Operations, and if applicable the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.[2] The nominee must be confirmed via majority vote by the Senate.[2] For the Navy, flag officer tours are usually limited to two years.[3]

List of commanders

No. Commander[4] Term
Portrait Name Took office Left office Term length
Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet
1
Robley D. Evans
Evans, Robley DunglisonRear Admiral
Robley D. Evans
(1846–1912)
January 1, 1906May 9, 19082 years, 129 days
2
Charles S. Sperry
Sperry, Charles StillmanRear Admiral
Charles S. Sperry
(1847–1911)
May 9, 1908March 1909~296 days
3
Seaton Schroeder
Schroeder, SeatonRear Admiral
Seaton Schroeder
(1849–1922)
March 1909June 1911~2 years, 92 days
4
Hugo W. Osterhaus
Osterhaus, Hugo W.Rear Admiral
Hugo W. Osterhaus
(1851–1927)
June 1911January 1913~1 year, 214 days
5
Charles J. Badger
Badger, Charles JohnstonRear Admiral
Charles J. Badger
(1853–1932)
January 1913September 1914~1 year, 243 days
6
Frank F. Fletcher
Fletcher, Frank FridayAdmiral
Frank F. Fletcher
(1855–1928)
[5]
September 1914June 1916~1 year, 274 days
7
Henry T. Mayo
Mayo, Henry ThomasAdmiral
Henry T. Mayo
(1856–1937)
June 1916June 1919~3 years, 0 days
8
Henry B. Wilson Jr.
Wilson, Henry Braid Jr.Admiral
Henry B. Wilson Jr.
(1861–1954)
June 1919June 1921~2 years, 0 days
9
Hilary P. Jones Jr.
Jones, Hilary Pollard Jr.Admiral
Hilary P. Jones Jr.
(1863–1938)
June 1919December 1922~1 year, 183 days
Position redesignated as Commander, Scouting Fleet from 1922 to 1931;
Commander, Scouting Force from 1931 to 1941
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet
10
Ernest J. King
King, Ernest JosephAdmiral
Ernest J. King
(1878–1956)
February 1, 1941December 30, 1941332 days
11
Royal E. Ingersoll
Ingersoll, Royal EasonAdmiral
Royal E. Ingersoll
(1883–1976)
December 30, 1941November 15, 19442 years, 321 days
12
Jonas H. Ingram
Ingram, Jonas HowardAdmiral
Jonas H. Ingram
(1886–1952)
November 15, 1944September 26, 19461 year, 315 days
13
Marc A. Mitscher
Mitscher, Marc AndrewAdmiral
Marc A. Mitscher
(1887–1947)
September 26, 1946February 3, 1947130 days
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet / Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command
14
William H. P. Blandy
Blandy, William Henry PurnellAdmiral
William H. P. Blandy
(1890–1954)
February 3, 1947February 1, 19502 years, 363 days
15
William M. Fechteler
Fechteler, William MorrowAdmiral
William M. Fechteler
(1896–1967)
February 1, 1950August 15, 19511 year, 195 days
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet / Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command /
Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic
16
Lynde D. McCormick
McCormick, Lynde DepuyAdmiral
Lynde D. McCormick
(1895–1956)
August 15, 1951April 12, 19542 years, 240 days
17
Jerauld Wright
Wright, JerauldAdmiral
Jerauld Wright
(1898–1995)
April 12, 1954February 28, 19605 years, 322 days
18
Robert L. Dennison
Dennison, Robert LeeAdmiral
Robert L. Dennison
(1901–1980)
February 28, 1960April 30, 19633 years, 61 days
19
Harold P. Smith
Smith, Harold PageAdmiral
Harold P. Smith
(1904–1993)
April 30, 1963April 30, 19652 years, 0 days
20
Thomas H. Moorer
Moorer, Thomas HinmanAdmiral
Thomas H. Moorer
(1912–2004)
April 30, 1965June 17, 19672 years, 48 days
21
Ephraim P. Holmes
Holmes, Ephraim PaulAdmiral
Ephraim P. Holmes
(1908–1997)
June 17, 1967September 30, 19703 years, 105 days
22
Charles K. Duncan
Duncan, Charles KenneyAdmiral
Charles K. Duncan
(1911–1994)
September 30, 1970October 31, 19722 years, 31 days
23
Ralph W. Cousins
Cousins, Ralph W.Admiral
Ralph W. Cousins
(1915–2009)
October 31, 1972May 30, 19752 years, 211 days
24
Isaac C. Kidd Jr.
Kidd, Isaac Campbell Jr.Admiral
Isaac C. Kidd Jr.
(1919–1999)
May 30, 1975September 30, 19783 years, 123 days
25
Harry D. Train II
Train, Harry Depue IIAdmiral
Harry D. Train II
(born 1927)
September 30, 1978September 30, 19824 years, 0 days
26
Wesley L. McDonald
McDonald, Wesley LeeAdmiral
Wesley L. McDonald
(1924–2009)
September 30, 1982October 4, 19853 years, 4 days
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet / Deputy Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command
27
Carlisle A. H. Trost
Trost, Carlisle Albert HermanAdmiral
Carlisle A. H. Trost
(born 1930)
October 4, 1985June 30, 1986269 days
28
Frank B. Kelso II
Kelso, Frank Benton IIAdmiral
Frank B. Kelso II
(1933–2013)
June 30, 1986September 16, 198678 days
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet
28
Frank B. Kelso II
Kelso, Frank Benton IIAdmiral
Frank B. Kelso II
(1933–2013)
September 16, 1986November 4, 19882 years, 49 days
29
Powell F. Carter Jr.
Carter, Powell Frederick Jr.Admiral
Powell F. Carter Jr.
(1931–2017)
November 4, 1988January 31, 19912 years, 88 days
30
Paul David Miller
Miller, Paul DavidAdmiral
Paul David Miller
(born 1941)
January 31, 1991July 13, 19921 year, 164 days
31
Henry H. Mauz Jr.
Mauz, Henry Herrward Jr.Admiral
Henry H. Mauz Jr.
(born 1936)
July 13, 1992October 5, 19942 years, 84 days
32
William J. Flanagan Jr.
Flanagan, William John Jr.Admiral
William J. Flanagan Jr.
(born 1943)
October 5, 1994December 20, 19962 years, 76 days
33
J. Paul Reason
Reason, Joseph PaulAdmiral
J. Paul Reason
(born 1941)
December 20, 1996September 17, 19992 years, 271 days
34
Vern Clark
Clark, Vernon EugeneAdmiral
Vern Clark
(born 1944)
September 17, 1999June 23, 2000280 days
35
Robert J. Natter
Natter, Robert JosephAdmiral
Robert J. Natter
(born 1945)
June 23, 2000October 1, 20022 years, 100 days
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet / Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
35
Robert J. Natter
Natter, Robert JosephAdmiral
Robert J. Natter
(born 1945)
October 1, 2002October 24, 200223 days
Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet / Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
35
Robert J. Natter
Natter, Robert JosephAdmiral
Robert J. Natter
(born 1945)
October 24, 2002October 3, 2003344 days
36
William J. Fallon
Fallon, William JosephAdmiral
William J. Fallon
(born 1944)
October 3, 2003February 18, 20051 year, 138 days
37
John B. Nathman
Nathman, John B.Admiral
John B. Nathman
(born 1948)
February 18, 2005May 22, 20061 year, 93 days
Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command
38
John B. Nathman
Nathman, John B.Admiral
John B. Nathman
(born 1948)
May 22, 2006May 16, 2007359 days
39
Gary Roughead
Roughead, GaryAdmiral
Gary Roughead
(born 1951)
May 17, 2007September 29, 2007134 days
40
Jonathan W. Greenert
Greenert, Jonathan WilliamAdmiral
Jonathan W. Greenert
(born 1953)
September 29, 2007July 23, 20091 year, 297 days
41
John C. Harvey Jr.
Harvey, John Collins Jr.Admiral
John C. Harvey Jr.
(born 1951)
July 24, 2009September 14, 20123 years, 52 days
42
William E. Gortney
Gortney, William EvansAdmiral
William E. Gortney
(born 1955)
September 14, 2012November 21, 2014[6]2 years, 68 days
-
Nora W. Tyson
Tyson, Nora WingfieldVice Admiral
Nora W. Tyson
(born 1957)
Acting
November 21, 2014[6]December 19, 201428 days
Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command / Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Northern Command
43
Philip S. Davidson
Davidson, Philip ScotAdmiral
Philip S. Davidson
(born 1960)
December 19, 2014May 4, 20183 years, 136 days
44
Christopher W. Grady
Grady, Christopher WatsonAdmiral
Christopher W. Grady
(born 1962)
May 4, 2018February 1, 2019273 days
Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command / Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Northern Command
and U.S. Naval Forces Strategic Command / Joint Functional Maritime Component Commander
44
Christopher W. Grady
Grady, Christopher WatsonAdmiral
Christopher W. Grady
(born 1962)
February 1, 2019December 7, 20212 years, 309 days
45
Daryl L. Caudle
Caudle, Daryl LaneAdmiral
Daryl L. Caudle
(born 1963)
December 7, 2021Incumbent201 days

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad "A Brief History Of The U.S. Fleet Forces Command". United States Navy. Retrieved October 2, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c [1] 10 USC 601. Positions of importance and responsibility: generals and lieutenant generals; admirals and vice admirals.
  3. ^ "Chief of Naval Operations. Navy Military Personnel Assignment Policy, 2006, pg 6" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on February 24, 2013. Retrieved September 19, 2013.
  4. ^ "Previous Commanders - U.S. Fleet Forces Command". U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  5. ^ Fletcher originally assumed office as a rear admiral then was promoted to admiral in 1915 bypassing the rank of vice admiral.
  6. ^ a b LaGrone, Sam (November 20, 2014). "Fleet Forces Deputy CO to Temporarily Take Command, Change of Command Cancelled". USNI News. Retrieved December 16, 2021.

Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document: "https://web.archive.org/web/20061005054622/http://www.cffc.navy.mil/history.htm".