Ships of the
United States Navy
Ships in current service
Ships grouped alphabetically
Ships grouped by type
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The IX (unclassified–miscellaneous) hull classification symbol is used for ships of the United States Navy that do not fit into one of the standard categories.[1][2] Similar lists of 'miscellaneous' ships can found at

List of auxiliaries of the United States Navy § Miscellaneous Ships (AG, T-AG)

and

List of yard and district craft of the United States Navy § District Auxiliary, Miscellaneous (YAG).

Ship status is indicated as either currently active [A] (including ready reserve), inactive [I], or precommissioning [P]. Ships in the inactive category include only ships in the inactive reserve, ships which have been disposed from US service have no listed status. Ships in the precommissioning category include ships under construction or on order; IX ships are generally not ordered as such, but are rather converted from other roles.

Historical overview

These vessels usually fall into these categories:

Unclassified miscellaneous vessels (IX)

IX-236 through IX-299 unused

IX-328 through IX-500 unused

Unclassified miscellaneous submarines (IXSS)

Main article: List of submarines of the United States Navy

A number of submarines were briefly given the IXSS hull symbol in 1971 prior to their disposal, nearly all had previously held the AGSS designation.[6]

See also

References

Citations

  1. ^ "Ship Abbreviations and Symbols". www.history.navy.mil. Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  2. ^ DiGiulian, Tony. "USN Ship Designations - NavWeaps". www.navweaps.com. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  3. ^ Glover, Bill (10 July 2015). "CS Dickenson". History of the Atlantic Cable & Undersea Communications. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  4. ^ de Pastino, Blake (December 31, 2015). "Sunken WWII Ship, Famed for Pearl Harbor Rescue Mission, Discovered Off Hawaii Coast". Western Digs. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  5. ^ "Turner I (Destroyer No. 259)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
  6. ^ Friedman, 1994, pp. 227-233

Sources