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Ships of the United States Navy
Ships in current service
Ships grouped alphabetically
Ships grouped by type
USS Constitution in 1997, formerly (IX-21) from 1941 to 1975

The IX (unclassified–miscellaneous) hull classification symbol is used for ships of the United States Navy that do not fit into one of the standard categories.[1][2] Similar lists of 'miscellaneous' ships can found at

List of auxiliaries of the United States Navy § Miscellaneous ships (AG, T-AG)

and

List of yard and district craft of the United States Navy § District auxiliary, miscellaneous (YAG).

Ship status is indicated as either currently active [A] (including ready reserve), inactive [I], or precommissioning [P]. Ships in the inactive category include only ships in the inactive reserve, ships which have been disposed from US service have no listed status. Ships in the precommissioning category include ships under construction or on order; IX ships are generally not ordered as such, but are rather converted from other roles.

Historical overview

These vessels usually fall into these categories:

Currently only one ship, USS Prevail (IX-537), actively carries an IX hull symbol.

Unclassified miscellaneous vessels (IX)

USS Dispatch (IX-2) as Boston
USS Hartford (IX-13)
USS Constellation (IX-20)
USS Olympia (IX-40) as (C-6)
Future USS Bowdoin (IX-50) frozen in Arctic ice with igloo habitats (1923)
USS Black Douglas (IX-55)
USS Wolverine (IX-64)
USS Kailua (IX-71) as Dickenson
USS Sable (IX-81)
USS Irene Forsyte (IX-93)
USS Moosehead (IX-98) as (DD-259)
USS Ocelot (IX-110)
USS Porcupine (IX-126)

Armadillo-class: MarCom Z-ET1-S-C3 hulls, mobile base storage tankers[16]

Other unknown classes

USS City of Dalhart (IX-156)
USS Trefoil (IX-149) as Midnight

Trefoil-class: MarCom B7-D1 concrete barges

Other unknown classes

USS President Warfield (IX-169) as SS Exodus
USS Callao (IX-205) as Externsteine
USS Big Horn (IX-207)

IX-236 through IX-299 unused

USS Prinz Eugen (IX-300)
USNS New Bedford (IX-308) as FS-289

IX-328 through IX-500 unused

Baylander (IX-514)
Sea Shadow (IX-529)
Joint Venture (IX-532)
USNS Prevail (IX-537) as (T-AGOS-8)
USS Neodesha (IX-540) as (YTB-815)

Unclassified miscellaneous submarines (IXSS)

Main article: List of submarines of the United States Navy

A number of submarines were briefly given the IXSS hull symbol in 1971 prior to their disposal, nearly all had previously held the AGSS designation.[34]

Gato class

Balao class

USS Perch as (ASSP-313)

Tench class

See also

References

Citations

  1. ^ "Ship Abbreviations and Symbols". www.history.navy.mil. Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  2. ^ DiGiulian, Tony. "USN Ship Designations - NavWeaps". www.navweaps.com. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  3. ^ "In Touch with the World from the Arctic" by Burnham McLeary, Radio Broadcast, August 1923, page 286.
  4. ^ "Cheng Ho (IX-52)". navsource.org. Retrieved 5 October 2010.
  5. ^ "Ship Naming in the United States Navy". Navy History & Heritage Command. Archived from the original on 3 January 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2011.
  6. ^ "IX-64 Wolverine". Global Security.org. Archived from the original on 10 July 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2009.
  7. ^ Puritan IV (IX-69). Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
  8. ^ Glover, Bill (10 July 2015). "CS Dickenson". History of the Atlantic Cable & Undersea Communications. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  9. ^ de Pastino, Blake (December 31, 2015). "Sunken WWII Ship, Famed for Pearl Harbor Rescue Mission, Discovered Off Hawaii Coast". Western Digs. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  10. ^ "Old Sailing Ship Handles War Job". San Pedro News Pilot. Vol. 18, no. 63. 1945-05-17. p. 8. Retrieved 2023-05-22. they languish at the end of an anchor just outside Breakwater Light, aboard what was the three-master Metha Nelson, now converted into an identification ship.[...]The navy didn't want a large modern ship. After all, it wasn't going anywhere. Now its main variety is when port pilots drop in, causing it to be known as the "pilots' boardinghouse."
  11. ^ "John M. Howard (IX-75)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Navy Department, Naval History and Heritage Command. 2015.
  12. ^ Naval History And Heritage Command (26 June 2015). "Brave". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History And Heritage Command. Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  13. ^ "The Greater Buffalo & The U.S.S. Sable". WNY Heritage Press. 2005. Archived from the original on 5 October 2008. Retrieved 19 July 2009.
  14. ^ "Turner I (Destroyer No. 259)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
  15. ^ "USS Ocelot". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. 2004. Retrieved 9 December 2011.
  16. ^ Liberty Tankers type (Z-) ET1-S-C3
  17. ^ Naval History And Heritage Command. "City of Dalhart". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History And Heritage Command. Retrieved 2 September 2019.
  18. ^ Naval History and Heritage Command. "President Warfield". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Navy Department, Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 8 August 2019.
  19. ^ Nozick, Daniel (January 25, 2017). "Hebrews on the High Seas". Baltimore Jewish Times.
  20. ^ "Barcelo (IX-199)"
  21. ^ Price, Arctic Combat:, U.S coast Guard Historian's Office
  22. ^ Naval History And Heritage Command. "Araner II (IX-226)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History And Heritage Command. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  23. ^ Sieche.
  24. ^ "KMS Dithmarschen". GlobalSecurity.org.
  25. ^ Gary P. Priolo. "Light Cargo Ship (AKL-17)". NavSource Naval History. Retrieved 2011-09-23.
  26. ^ National Air Defense Radar Museum. "The Texas Towers". Archived from the original on 2012-04-02. Retrieved 2011-09-23.
  27. ^ "U.S. Coast Guard Barque Eagle (WIX 327)". United States Coast Guard. 11 April 2014. Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 29 February 2016.
  28. ^ "Helicopter Landing Trainer [HLT]-(IX-514)". NavSource. 20 November 2015. Retrieved 22 November 2016.
  29. ^ Newman, Barry (February 24, 2009). "The Navy has a Top-Secret Vessel it wants to put on display; Sea Shadow and its Satellite-Proof Barge need a home; Plotting in Providence". Wall Street Journal. p. 1.
  30. ^ "IX-532". nvr.navy.mil. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  31. ^ "Ex-USNS Prevail takes on new role for Navy".
  32. ^ "Neodesha (YTB-815)". Retrieved 2011-11-25.
  33. ^ W. Sayers, Ken (23 May 2019). U.S. Navy Auxiliary Vessels: A History and Directory from World War I to Today. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland. p. 338. ISBN 978-1476635323.
  34. ^ Friedman, 1994, pp. 227-233

Sources