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Ships of the United States Navy
Ships in current service
Ships grouped alphabetically
Ships grouped by type
USS Shasta (AE-33, left), USS Kiska (AE-35, right), USS Flint (AE-32, rear) in 2005

This is a list of auxiliaries of the United States Navy. It covers the various types of ships that support the frontline combat vessels of the United States Navy.

Auxiliary ships which function as hospital ships and as oilers are to be found in their own articles: List of United States Navy hospital ships and List of United States Navy oilers. Escort carriers, amphibious warfare vessels, and some mine warfare vessels were also originally classed as auxiliaries but were later given their own hull classification symbols outside the auxiliary series (which all begin with an 'A'). Links to these and other list articles of similar ships can be found throughout this article.

Yard and district craft also function as auxiliaries but generally are smaller and less capable than their ocean-going counterparts, and so they generally remain in harbors and coastal areas. Their hull classification symbols begin with a 'Y'.

Ship status is indicated as either currently active [A], ready reserve [R], inactive [I], or precommissioning [P]. Ships in the inactive category include only ships in the inactive reserve, ships which have been disposed from US service have no listed status. Ships in the precommissioning category include ships under construction or on order.

Listed ship classes will often state 'MA type' or 'MC type'. The difference is that 'MC Type' refers to ships designed by the United States Maritime Commission aka MarCom, while 'MA Type' refers to ships designed or converted under MarCom's successor agency, the United States Maritime Administration or MarAd. They are in fact the same designs, and the year 1950 is the date at which MarAd succeeded MarCom.

Historical overview

Prior to the creation of the auxiliary hull classification system, ships that performed such tasks had no symbol or code to identify them, only informal designations such as Fleet Collier No. 1.

World War I

During World War I the Navy created the Section patrol (SP) and identification number (ID) system to register civilian vessels for naval acquisition. The ID series can be considered a forerunner of the current auxiliary hull numbering system, and some ships with ID numbers were later given 'A' hull symbols.

Also during WWI a series of mass-produced ships were designed by the Emergency Fleet Corporation, but few were completed before the end of the war and even fewer became naval auxiliaries.

Pre-World War II

Until World War II the US auxiliary fleet was notable for being composed of non-standard ships which had been purchased ad-hoc. Very few were designed specifically for their intended role.

Interesting examples from the 1920's of rare early auxiliaries deliberately designed for their roles include the destroyer tenders USS Dobbin (AD-3) and USS Whitney (AD-4), the repair ship USS Medusa (AR-1), and the submarine tender USS Holland (AS-3): these 4 ships had the same length hulls and similar superstructures, so they were likely of the same basic design.

In the late 1930's the Navy began the construction of 22 large tenders and repair ships to a new basic design: all were nearly identical in hull form, power plant, and superstructure (but the seaplane tenders had a large hangar that the others lacked):

The last of these 22 ships (the submarine tender Sperry) was scrapped in 2011.[1]

Also at this time the Navy began the construction of 4 large net layers (AN)s and 3 minelayers (CM)s to a different basic design, but changing requirements resulted in all but one minelayer being redesignated as transports (AP)s and then converted into Landing ships, vehicle (LSV)s.[A 1][2]

World War II

During the naval build-up for World War II over 700 vessels of Maritime Commission (MarCom, later MarAd) standard designs were converted to US Navy auxiliaries,[A 2] as were a few Landing Ships Medium (LSM)s:

Post World War II

During the Cold War over 100 United States Maritime Administration (MarAd) standard designs were converted to US Navy auxiliaries:[A 5]

Modern auxiliaries have been designed to reduce operating costs by introducing scales of economies with larger ships and by reducing manning requirements (a trend begun in 1949 with the introduction of manning non-commissioned ships with civilian crews under the Military Sealift Command and its predecessors - such ships carry the 'T-' prefix on their hull symbols and the USNS prefix rather than USS; ships with MV or SS prefixes are under long-term charter with the Navy rather than under Navy ownership).

Crane ships (AB)

Colliers (AC)

USS Cyclops (AC-4)

Further information: Collier (ship)

Auxiliary minelayers (ACM)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Auxiliary minelayers (ACM)

Auxiliary crane ships (T-ACS)

SS Grand Canyon State (T-ACS-3)
SS Cornhusker State (T-ACS-6)

unknown class: MA type C6-S-MA1qd

Gopher State-class: MA type C5-S-73b

unknown class: MA type C6-S-1aq

unknown class: MA type C6-S-MA60d

Auxiliary aircraft carriers (ACV)

The Auxiliary aircraft carriers (ACV) were designated as Auxiliary aircraft escort vessels (AVG) until 20 August 1942 and then were redesignated Escort aircraft carriers (CVE) on 15 July 1943.

Main article: List of United States Navy escort aircraft carriers

Destroyer tenders (AD)

USS Dobbin (AD-3)
USS Denebola (AD-12)
USS Dixie (AD-14)
USS Isle Royale (AD-29)
USS Yellowstone (AD-41)

Further information: Destroyer tender

Dobbin-class

Unknown classes

Altair-class

Dixie-class

Cascade-class

Hamul-class: MC type C3

Klondike-class: MC type C3

Shenandoah-class: MC type C3

Alcor-class

Samuel Gompers-class

Yellowstone-class

Degaussing ships (ADG)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Degaussing ships (ADG)

Ammunition ships (AE)

USS Shasta (AE-6)
USS Vesuvius (AE-15)
USS Mauna Kea (AE-22)
USS Pyro (AE-24)
USNS Kilauea (T-AE-26)

Further information: Ammunition ship

Lassen-class: MC types C2, C2-T, C2-N

Unknown class: MC type C1-A

Mount Hood-class: MC type C2-S-AJ1

Fomalhaut-class: MC type C1-A

Suribachi-class

Nitro-class

Andromeda-class: MA type C2-S-B1

Kilauea-class

Auxiliary floating drydock

Further information: Auxiliary floating drydock

Large auxiliary repair docks (ABSD)

Reclassified as Large Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDB) in August 1946.

Large auxiliary floating dry docks (AFDB)

Further information: Auxiliary floating drydock § Large Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDB)

Small auxiliary floating dry docks (AFDL)

Further information: Auxiliary floating drydock § Small Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFD - AFDL)

Medium auxiliary floating dry docks (AFDM)

Further information: Auxiliary floating drydock § Medium Auxiliary Floating Dry Docks (AFDM)

All AFDMs were classified as YFDs until 1945.

Auxiliary repair docks (ARD)

Further information: Auxiliary floating drydock § Auxiliary Repair Docks (ARD)

Medium auxiliary repair docks (ARDM)

Yard floating drydocks (YFD)

Main article: List of yard and district craft of the United States Navy § Yard floating drydocks (YFD)

All YFDs were reclassified as AFDMs in 1945.

Provisions store ships (AF, T-AF)

USS Hyades (AF-28)
USS Adria (AF-30)
USS Sirius (AF-60)
USS Regulus (AF-57)
USS Vega (AF-59)

Further information: Reefer ship § Reefers in U.S. Navy service

Hyades-class: MC type C2-S-E1

Adria-class: MC type R1-M-AV3

Alstede-class: MC type R2-S-BV1 or C2-S-B1

Unknown class: MC type C2-S-B1

Grommet Reefer-class: MA type C1-M-AV1

Denebola-class: MA type VC2-S-AP2

Rigel-class: MA type R3-S-4A

Combat stores ships (AFS, T-AFS)

USS Mars (AFS-1)
USNS Spica (T-AFS-9)

Further information: Combat stores ship

Mars-class

Sirius-class

Miscellaneous ships (AG, T-AG)

For similar lists of 'miscellaneous' ships see:

List of unclassified miscellaneous vessels of the United States Navy (IX)

and

List of yard and district craft of the United States Navy § District auxiliary, miscellaneous (YAG)
USS Wyoming (AG-17)
USS Sequoia (AG-23)
USS Potomac (AG-25)
USS Argonne (AG-31) as (AS-10)
USS Anacapa (AG-49)
USS Mississippi (AG-128)
USS Whidbey (AG-141)
USS Timmerman (AG-152)
USS Compass Island (AG-153)
USS King County (AG-157)
USNS Kingsport (T-AG-164)
USNS Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193)

Icebreakers (AGB)

USS Glacier (AGB-4)

Further information: Icebreaker

Amphibious force command ships (AGC)

Main article: List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § Amphibious force flagship (AGC)

Deep submergence support ship (T-AGDS)

Further information: Deep-submergence vehicle

Hydrofoil research ship (AGEH)

Further information: Hydrofoil § United States

See also: List of patrol vessels of the United States Navy § Hydrofoil vessels

Environmental research ships (AGER)

USS Pueblo (AGER-2)

Signals intelligence collection vessels.

Further information: Technical research ship § Environmental research ship (AGER)

Banner-class

Command ships (AGF)

Further information: Command ship, List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § Landing Platform Dock (LPD), and § Small seaplane tenders (AVP)

Missile range instrumentation ships (T-AGM)

USNS Redstone (T-AGM-20)
USNS Observation Island (T-AGM-23)

Further information: Tracking ship § United States Navy/United States Air Force

Major communications relay ships (AGMR)

Further information: Radio relay

Oceanographic research ships (T-AGOR)

USNS Robert D. Conrad (T-AGOR-3)
USNS Mizar (T-AGOR-11)
USNS Knorr T-AGOR-15)
USNS Thomas G. Thompson T-AGOR-23)
RV Sally Ride T-AGOR-28)

"AGOR" redirects here. For the Greek basketball club sometimes called "AGOR", see Rethymno Aegean B.C.

Further information: Research vessel

Robert D. Conrad-class

Eltanin-class: MC type C1-ME2-13a

Melville-class

Hayes-class

Diver-class

Gyre-class

Thomas G. Thompson-class

Kilo Moana-class

Neil Armstrong-class

Ocean surveillance ships (T-AGOS)

USNS Stalwart (T-AGOS-1)
USNS Impeccable (T-AGOS-23)

Underwater acoustics collection vessels.

Stalwart-class

Victorious-class

Impeccable-class

Motor torpedo boat tenders (AGP)

Radar picket ships (AGR)

USS Tracer (AGR-15)

Further information: Radar picket § Converted merchant ships

Guardian-class: MC type Z-EC2-S-C5

All Guardian-class ships were originally classed as YAGR but were then reclassed as AGR in 1958.

Surveying ships (AGS)

USS Pathfinder (AGS-1)
USS Maury (AGS-16)
USNS Dutton (T-AGS-22)
USNS Silas Bent (AGS-26)
USNS Chauvenet (T-AGS-29)
USNS Bowditch (T-AGS-62)

Further information: Survey vessel

YMS-135-subclass

Artemis-class: MC type S4–SE2–BE1

Auk-class

Bowditch-class: MA type VC2-S-AP3

Other classes

Silas Bent-class

Other classes

Pathfinder-class

Coastal survey ships (AGSC)

Submarine and special warfare support vessel (T-AGSE)

Black Powder-class

Auxiliary submarines (AGSS)

Main article: List of submarines of the United States Navy

See also: List of unclassified miscellaneous vessels of the United States Navy § Unclassified miscellaneous submarines (IXSS)

USS Albacore (AGSS-569)
USS Dolphin (AGSS-555)

Gato class

Balao class

Tench class

Albacore class

Dolphin class

Technical research ships (AGTR)

USS Oxford (AG-159 / AGTR-1)

Signals intelligence collection vessels.

Further information: Technical research ship

Oxford-class: MA type Z–EC2–S–C5

Belmont-class: MA type VC2-S-AP3

Hospital ships (AH)

Main article: List of United States Navy hospital ships § Post-Geneva Conventions

Further information: Hospital ship

Dry cargo ships (AK, T-AK)

Attack cargo ships (AKA)

Main article: List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § Attack cargo ship (AKA)

Cargo ship dock (T-AKD)

The Point Barrow was similar in design to the amphibious warfare Landing Ships Dock (LSD)s, but with a hull strengthened for sailing in Arctic ice.

Advanced auxiliary dry cargo ships (T-AKE)

USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE-3)

Advanced Auxiliary Dry Cargo Ships (T-AKE) are designed to deliver ammunition, provisions, stores, spare parts, potable water and petroleum products via underway replenishment; they effectively combine the missions of Ammunition Ships (AE) and Combat Stores Ships (AFS, T-AFS) along with a limited refueling capability.

Lewis and Clark-class

Small cargo ships (AKL)

Net cargo ships (AKN)

USS Zebra (AKN-5)

Indus class: MC type EC2-S-C1

Other classes

Vehicle cargo ships (T-AKR)

USNS Comet (T-AK-269)
SS Cape Island (T-AKR-10)
USNS Shughart (T-AKR-295)
USNS Gordon (T-AKR 296)
USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300)
USNS Watson (T-AKR-310)

Further information: Large, Medium-Speed Roll-on/Roll-off

Cape-I-class: MA Type C7-S-95

Cape-T-class

Algol-class

Shughart-Class

Gordon-Class

Bob Hope-class

Watson-class

Other classes

General stores issue ships (AKS)

Castor and Unknown classes: all MC type C2

Acubens-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

LST-542 class

Belle Isle-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

LST-542 class

Antares-class: MA type VC2-S-AP3

Aircraft transports (AKV, T-AKV)

USS Kitty Hawk (AKV-1) as (APV-1)
USS Siboney (AKV-12) as (CVE-112)

LT. James E. Robinson class: MA type VC2-S-AP1

Other classes

Commencement Bay class: MA type T3

USS Marcus Island (AKV-27) as (CVE-77)

Casablanca class: MA type S4-S2-BB3

Commencement Bay class

USNS Card (T-AKV-40) as (CVE-11)

Bogue class: MA types C3-S-A1 and C3-S-A2

Auxiliary minesweepers

Minesweepers (AM)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Minesweepers (AM)

Auxiliary Base Minesweepers (AMb)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Auxiliary base minesweepers (AMb)

Coastal Minesweepers (AMc)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Coastal minesweepers (AMc)

Coastal Minesweepers (Underwater Locator) (AMCU)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Coastal minesweepers (Underwater locator) (AMCU)

Ocean Minesweepers (AMS)

Main article: List of mine warfare vessels of the United States Navy § Ocean minesweepers (AMS)

Net laying ships (AN)

USS Montauk (AN-2)
USS Ash (AN-7)
USS Silverbell (AN-51)
USS Yazoo (AN-92)

Further information: Net laying ship § US Navy

All of the following ships were originally classed as Yard Net Tenders, see List of yard and district craft of the United States Navy § Yard Net Tenders (YN) for the original hull numbers.

Aloe-class

Ailanthus-class

Cohoes-class

Net layer (ANL)

Fleet oilers (AO, T-AO)

Main article: List of United States Navy oilers § Fleet Oilers (AO)

Fast combat support ships (AOE, T-AOE)

Main article: List of United States Navy oilers § Fast Combat Support Ships (AOE)

Gasoline tankers (AOG, T-AOG)

USS Patapsco (AOG-1)
USS Mettawee (AOG-17)
USS Klickitat (AOG-64)

All AOG tankers were MarCom (MC) T1 tankers, with the exception of these former commercial ships: the Halawa-class, AOG-13, AOG-14, AOG-16 and AOG-47.

Patapsco-class: MC type T1-MT-M1

Halawa-class

Mettawee-class: MC type T1-M-A2

Klickitat-class: MC type T1-M-BT1

Other / unknown classes

Light replenishment oilers (T-AOL)

Main article: List of United States Navy oilers § Light Replenishment Oilers (T-AOL)

Replenishment oilers (AOR)

Main article: List of United States Navy oilers § Fleet Replenishment Oilers (AOR)

Oiler submarines (AOSS)

Main article: List of submarines of the United States Navy

Oil transporters (T-AOT)

Main article: List of United States Navy oilers § Transport Oilers (AOT)

Transports (AP, T-AP)

Further information: Troopship

Attack transports (APA)

Main article: List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § Attack transport (APA)

Self-propelled barracks ships (APB)

USS Benewah (APB-35)

Benewah-class

All ships of this class were based on LST hulls, but less than half were converted from actual LSTs.

Other class

Coastal transports (APC)

Small coastal transports (APc)

APc-1-class small coastal transports:

High-speed transports (APD)

Main article: List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § High-speed transport (APD)

Evacuation transports (APH)

Main article: List of United States Navy hospital ships § Evacuation Ships of WWII

Further information: Evacuation transport

Barracks craft (APL)

USS APL-4
USS APL-31
USS APL-42

Further information: Type B ship § Barracks Barge

APL-2-class

APL-17-class

APL-41-class

APL-53 class

Other classes

APL-61-class

APL-65 class

APL-67-class

Mechanized artillery transports (APM)

APM was the original hull designation of what became the Landing Ship, Dock (LSD).

Main article: List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § Mechanized artillery transports (APM)

Convoy rescue craft (APR)

APR was the original hull symbol intended for the patrol craft escorts that were converted to rescue crews from ships attacked in convoys, but they were instead redesignated as PCERs.[26]

Main article: List of patrol vessels of the United States Navy § Patrol craft escort, and patrol craft escort rescue (PCE, PCER)

Transport submarines (APS, APSS)

Main article: List of submarines of the United States Navy

See also: List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships § Transport submarine (APS, ASSP, APSS)

Transport and aircraft ferries (APV)

Repair ships (AR)

USS Medusa (AR-1)
USS Vulcan (AR-5)
USS Delta (AR-9)
USS Grand Canyon (AR-28)

Further information: Repair ship § United States Navy

Vulcan-class

Delta-class: MC type C3

Altair-class

Amphion-class

Xanthus-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

Klondike-class: MC type C3

Shenandoah-class: MA type C3

Battle damage repair ships (ARB)

USS Aristaeus (ARB-1)

Base repair ship (ARb)

Cable repair ships (ARC)

USS Aeolus (ARC-3)
USNS Zeus (T-ARC-7)

Further information: Cable layer

Aeolus-class: MA type S4–SE2–BE1

Neptune-class: MA type S3-S2-BP1

Zeus-class

Two other Navy vessels performed cable support operations without the ARC hull classification: USS Nashawena (AG-142 / YAG-35) and Kailua (IX-71).

Internal combustion engine repair ships (ARG)

USS Oglala (ARG-1)
SS Luzon (ARG-2)

Aroostook-class

Luzon-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

Basilan-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

Other ships

Heavy-hull repair ship (ARH)

Landing craft repair ships (ARL)

Achelous-class

Rescue and salvage ships (ARS)

USS Redwing (ARS-4) as (AM-48)
USS Grapple (ARS-7)
USS Restorer (ARS-17)
USS Bolster (ARS-38)
USS Safeguard (ARS-50)

Further information: Rescue and salvage ship

Lapwing-class

Diver-class

Unknown class

Anchor-class

Rescuer-class

Ex-commercial vessels

Weight-class

Tackle-class

Bolster-class

Safeguard-class

Salvage lifting vessels (ARSD)

USS Windlass (ARS(D)-4)

Salvage craft tenders (ARST)

Aircraft repair ships (ARV, ARV(E), ARV(A))

USS Chourre

Chourre-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

Aventinus-class

Fabius-class

Helicopter aircraft repair ships (ARVH)

Submarine tenders (AS)

USS Holland (AS-3)
USS Fulton (AS-11)
USS Hunley (AS-31)
USS L.Y. Spear (AS-36)
USS Emory S. Land (AS-39), top, and USS Frank Cable (AS-40)

Further information: Submarine tender § United States

Ships which have functioned as submarine tenders without the AS designation include the four Arkansas-class monitors.

Fulton-class

Griffin-class: MC type C3

Ex-commercial ships

Aegir-class: MC type C3-S-A2

Uncertain class

Hunley-class

Simon Lake-class

L. Y. Spear-class

Emory S. Land-class

Submarine rescue vessels (ASR)

USS Penguin (ASR-12)
USS Sunbird (ASR-15)
USS Pigeon (ASR-21)

Further information: Submarine rescue ship

Lapwing-class

Chanticleer-class

Penguin-class

Pigeon-class

The Pigeon-class was designed to operate deep submergence rescue vehicles (DSRV).

Cargo transport submarines (ASSA)

Main article: List of submarines of the United States Navy

Fleet tugs (AT)

USS Sonoma (AT-12) as (ATO-12)
USS Mohave (AT-15)
USS Kewaydin (AT-24) as (ATO-24)
USS Navajo (AT-64)
USS Cocopa (AT-101) as (ATF-101)

Sonoma-class

Arapaho-class

Bagaduce-class

Cherokee-class

Further information: Type V ship § Cherokee-class tugboat

Abnaki-class

Further information: Type V ship § Abnaki-class tugboat

Sotoyomo-class

Further information: Type V ship § Sotoyomo-class tugboat

Lapwing-class

Auxiliary ocean tugs (ATA, T-ATA)

The first ten boats of the Sotoyomo-class were originally classed as Fleet Tugs (AT), as were ATA-146, ATA-166, and ATA-167.

Sotoyomo-class

ATA-214-class

Other classes

Fleet ocean tugs (ATF, T-ATF)

All tugs of the Cherokee and Abnaki classes were reclassed from Fleet Tugs (AT) on 15 May 1944.

Cherokee-class

Abnaki-class

USNS Powhatan (T-ATF-166)

Powhatan-class

Fleet tugs, old (ATO)

The Fleet Tug Old classification was created on 15 May 1944, several Fleet Tugs received this classification at this time without a change of hull number.

Sonoma-class

Bagaduce-class

Lapwing-class

Rescue tugs (ATR)

ATR-1 class

Sotoyomo-class

Salvage and rescue ships (ATS)

USS Brunswick (ATS-3)
Graphic representation of a Navajo-class towing, salvage and rescue ship

Edenton-class

ATS-4 and ATS-5 skipped

Navajo-class

Seaplane tenders (AV)

USS Langley (AV-3)
USS Curtiss (AV-4)
USS Patoka (AV-6) as (AO-9)
USS Currituck (AV-7)
USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13)
USS Kenneth Whiting (AV-14)

Further information: Seaplane tender

Ships which have functioned as seaplane tenders without the AV designation include the USS Mississippi (BB-23) in 1914, the USS Ajax (AG-15) in 1924-1925, and the USS Christiana (IX-80 / YAG-32) in WW2.[33]

Wright-class

Jason-class

Langley-class

Curtiss-class[34]

Patoka-class

Currituck class

Tangier-class: MC type C3

Pocomoke-class

Chandeleur-class

Kenneth Whiting-class: MC type C3 [35]

unknown class

Ashland-class

Advance aviation base ships (AVB, T-AVB)

SS Wright (T-AVB-3)

Wright-class: MA type C5-S-78

Seaplane catapult, light (AVC)

Destroyer seaplane tenders (AVD)

USS Gillis (AVD-12)

Clemson class[37]

Auxiliary aircraft escort vessels (AVG)

The Auxiliary aircraft escort vessels (AVG) were redesignated Auxiliary aircraft carriers (ACV) on 20 August 1942 and then Escort aircraft carriers (CVE) on 15 July 1943.

Main article: List of United States Navy escort aircraft carriers

Guided missile ships (AVM)

Small seaplane tenders (AVP)

USS Lapwing (AVP-1) as (AM-1)

Lapwing-class[37]

Clemson-class

USS Barnegat (AVP-10)

Barnegat-class

Aviation stores issue ships (AVS)

USS Nicollet (AVS-6)

Grumium-class: MC type EC2-S-C1

Gwinnett-class: MC type C1-M-AV1

Other

Aircraft transports (AVT)

All of these aircraft carriers received this classification while in reserve in 1959, 1960, and 1961, and none ever operated as Aircraft Transports after receiving it.

Independence class

Saipan class

Essex class

Auxiliary aircraft landing training ships (AVT)

Distilling ships (AW)

USS Pasig (AW-3)

Further information: Distilling ship

Stag-class: MC type Z-ET1-S-C3

Pasig-class: MC type T2-SE-A2

Lighter-than-air aircraft tender (AZ)

Miscellaneous classifications (IX)

Main article: List of unclassified miscellaneous vessels of the United States Navy

Yard and district craft (Y)

Main article: List of yard and district craft of the United States Navy

Pre-1920 craft

Screw tugs

World War I (ID) series

Civilian cargo ships, tankers, transports, etc., were registered during World War I for potential use and given "ID" identification numbers in the "ID/SP" numbering series.

Main article: Section patrol craft § Identification numbers (ID)

See also

References

Citations

  1. ^ a b "Archived copy - National Defense Reserve Fleet Inventory For the month ending September 30, 2011" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-02-24. Retrieved 2012-01-04.
  2. ^ Friedman, 2002, pp 178-182
  3. ^ a b c d "Crane Ships, Heavy Lift Ships, Tanker Retired from Sealift Fleet". Navy League. 21 June 2021. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  4. ^ "WEST ELCASCO (AK-33)".
  5. ^ a b "H-039-5: The Explosion of Ammunition Ship USS Mount Hood (AE-11), 10 November 1944".
  6. ^ a b c d e f Berkhouse, L. H.; Davis, S. E.; Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J. H.; Jones, C. R.; Martin, E. J.; McMullan, F. W.; Osborn, M. J.; Rogers, W. E. (1983). Operation Sandstone: 1948 (PDF). Washington, D. C.: Defense Nuclear Agency. p. 40. OCLC 10437826. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved August 17, 2011.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Martin, Edwin J; Rowland, Richard H (April 1, 1982). Castle Series, 1954 (PDF). Washington DC: Defense Nuclear Agency. Kaman Tempo. OCLC 831905820. DNA 6035F.
  8. ^ "Class: Unnamed (EAG 155, C4-S-1a)".
  9. ^ a b c d e "Notable U.S. Navy Ships Lost Since World War II". US Naval Institute. 28 August 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
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  13. ^ "Keel Authenticated for T-AGS 67" (Press release). US Navy. 5 October 2022. Retrieved 5 October 2022.
  14. ^ Mongilio, Heather (December 2022). "SECNAV Del Toro Names Future Survey Ship After Titanic Discoverer Robert Ballard". USNI News. United States Naval Institute.
  15. ^ a b "DOT, DOD, and Maritime Industry Work to Strengthen Ready Reserve Force". maritime.dot.gov. 25 March 2022. Retrieved 18 August 2023.
  16. ^ "Cape Cape Ray neutralizes Syrian chemical materials". www.msc.navy.mil. U.S. Navy Military Sealift Command. August 2014. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  17. ^ Dead Reckoning: The Pollux-Truxton Disaster
  18. ^ "The Attack on the USNS Card". October 7, 2015.
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  20. ^ a b c d e f g h "Analysis of Radiation Exposure for Navy Personnel at Operation Ivy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2023-07-09.
  21. ^ NavSource Online: Service Ship Photo Archive - AOG-24 Sheepscot
  22. ^ "APc-21". Retrieved 4 December 2009.
  23. ^ "Repair and Berthing Barges YR YRB YRBM YRDH YRDM YRR". Shipbuildinghistory.com. Retrieved 6 July 2022.
  24. ^ LST-53
  25. ^ Pursuivant
  26. ^ Friedman, Small Combatants, p. 85
  27. ^ Apache
  28. ^ NavSource Online: Service Ship Photo Archive - AT-12 / ATO-12 Sonoma
  29. ^ USS Partridge.com
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Footnotes

  1. ^ These ships were USS Monitor (AN-1), USS Montauk (AN-2), USS Osage (AN-3), USS Saugus (AN-4), USS Terror (CM-5), USS Catskill (CM-6), and USS Ozark (CM-7); only Terror was not converted to an LSV
  2. ^ MarCom ships converted to escort carriers, oilers, and amphibious warfare ships are not included in these counts, even if they had 'A' hull symbols. If a ship had multiple 'A' symbols, it is counted only under the last assigned
  3. ^ AG-169, AG-171, AG-175 were Type C1 ships
  4. ^ AG-172, AG-173, AG-174 were Type VC2 Victory ships
  5. ^ Escort carriers converted to Aircraft Transports (AKV)s are counted here
  6. ^ AGM-13 through AGM-18 were all Type C1 ships (AGM-16 converted to AGS)
  7. ^ AGS-35, AGS-36 were Type C1 ships
  8. ^ AG-178 was a Type C2 ship
  9. ^ AG-153 was a Type C4 ship
  10. ^ AGM-9, AGM-10, AGM-23 were Type C4 ships
  11. ^ AGM-12 was a Type EC2 Liberty ship
  12. ^ AF-58, AF-59
  13. ^ AG-157 was an LST
  14. ^ AGM-19, AGM-20, AGM-21 were converted T2 tankers
  15. ^ AG-164 was a Type VC2 Victory ship; 10 more were to have been converted to depot ships for use in Vietnam, they were given hull numbers AG-179 through AG-189, but the conversions were cancelled
  16. ^ AGM-1, AGM-3 through AGM-8, AGM-11, AGM-22 were Type VC2 Victory ships
  17. ^ The Bowditch-class and AGS-37 were Type VC2 Victory ships
  18. ^ E-AG-398 was an LSM
  19. ^ USS Arequipa participated in Operation Sandstone and Operation Castle
  20. ^ Type EC Liberty ship, participated in the Operation Dominic nuclear tests as USAS [Army Ship] American Mariner
  21. ^ USS Reclaimer participated in Operation Crossroads, Operation Castle, Operation Wigwam, and Operation Dominic
  22. ^ USS Gypsy participated in Operation Castle and Operation Wigwam
  23. ^ USS Sioux participated in Operation Crossroads, Operation Castle, and Operation Dominic
  24. ^ USS Cree participated in Operation Wigwam and Operation Dominic
  25. ^ USS Lipan participated in Operation Ivy and Operation Dominic
  26. ^ USS Arikara participated in Operation Ivy and Operation Dominic
  27. ^ USS Molala participated in Operation Castle and Operation Wigwam
  28. ^ USS Tawakoni participated in Operation Castle and Operation Dominic
  29. ^ USS Curtiss participated in Operation Sandstone, Operation Greenhouse, Operation Ivy, Operation Wigwam, and Operation Redwing
  30. ^ USS Norton Sound participated in Operation Argus and Operation Dominic

Sources

Museum ships