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Danny Everett
Personal information
Full nameDaniel Joseph Everett
Nationality American
Born (1966-11-01) November 1, 1966 (age 57)
Van Alstyne, Texas
Sport
SportRunning
EventSprints
College teamUCLA Bruins
ClubSanta Monica Track Club
Medal record
Men’s athletics
Representing the  United States
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1988 Seoul 4×400 m relay
Bronze medal – third place 1988 Seoul 400 m
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 1987 Rome 4×400 m relay
Silver medal – second place 1991 Tokyo 4×400 m relay
Bronze medal – third place 1991 Tokyo 400 m

Danny Everett (born November 1, 1966) is an American former track and field athlete who competed in sprinting events, specializing in the 400 metres. He won bronze medals in the 400m at the 1988 Olympic Games and at the 1991 World Championships, and won gold medals in the 4 × 400 m relay at the 1987 World Championships and the 1988 Olympic Games. His 400m best of 43.81 seconds when winning the 1992 US Olympic trials, moved him to second on the world all-time list and still ranks him 13th on the world all-time list (as of September 2023).

Early life

Everett was born in Van Alstyne, Texas, then moved to South Central Los Angeles as a child. Everett did not start running track until tenth grade at Fairfax High School,[1] when the high school track coach encouraged him to try out for the team. In two short years, Everett cultivated his natural athletic talent and as a senior placed second in the 400 meters at the California State High School Track & Field championships.

After graduating from Fairfax, Danny attended UCLA. As a Bruin, Everett's track achievements included: NCAA champion in 400 meters and 1600 meter relay,[2] three-time NCAA All-American, and two-time Pac-10 400 meter and 1600 meter relay champion. Everett was inducted into the UCLA Athletics Hall of Fame in 2003.[3]

Olympic teams

From 1987 to 1992, Everett qualified for the U.S. Olympic team where he won gold and bronze medals in the 1600 meter relay and 400 meters in the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea.[4] Everett also won gold, silver and bronze medals at the World Championships in Rome, Italy in 1987 and in Tokyo, Japan in 1991. During his career, Everett set five world records in the 300 meters,[5] 400 meters, 1600 meter relay and 4 x 200 meter. In 1992, Everett qualified for the U.S. Olympic Team, running the fastest Olympic qualifying time in U.S. history at 43.81 and at that time the second fastest time in history. Everett suffered a foot injury at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain.

Personal life

This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately.Find sources: "Danny Everett" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (January 2021) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Everett and his wife Tiarzha Taylor live in Upper Ojai, California with their three children. He coaches track & field for the Ojai Roadrunners in Ojai.[6] Everett has served as consultant for local athletic programs, and co-founded Precious Medals, a sports merchandising firm. Everett later attended the Los Angeles Culinary Institute and launched SoulFête, a culinary event series.

References

  1. ^ Florence, Mal (April 15, 1986). "Track and Field : Danny Everett Has Emerged as UCLA's Star". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. ^ "UCLA sprinter Danny Everett, who won 2..." Los Angeles Times. January 28, 1989. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  3. ^ "UCLA To Induct Eight New Members Into Athletics Hall of Fame". UCLA. September 23, 2003. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  4. ^ "400-Meter Indoor Record Bettered by Everett Again". Los Angeles Times. February 3, 1992. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  5. ^ "300-meter dash record erased". Spokane Chronicle. September 4, 1990. Retrieved January 1, 2021 – via Google News.
  6. ^ "Leadership Team". Ojai Roadrunners. Retrieved January 1, 2021.