Dolton, Illinois
Village
Official seal of Dolton, Illinois
Motto: 
"A community working together"
Location of Dolton in Cook County, Illinois.
Location of Dolton in Cook County, Illinois.
Location of Illinois in the United States
Location of Illinois in the United States
Coordinates: 41°37′39″N 87°35′55″W / 41.62750°N 87.59861°W / 41.62750; -87.59861
CountryUnited States
StateIllinois
CountyCook
TownshipThornton
Incorporated1893
Government
 • TypeMayor-council
 • MayorTiffany A. Henyard
Area
 • Total4.69 sq mi (12.14 km2)
 • Land4.57 sq mi (11.84 km2)
 • Water0.12 sq mi (0.30 km2)  2.56%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total21,426
 • Density4,687.38/sq mi (1,809.94/km2)
Standard of living (2009-11)
 • Per capita income$21,742
 • Median home value$131,600
ZIP code(s)
60419
Area code(s)708
Geocode17-20292
FIPS code17-20292
Websitevodolton.org

Dolton (pronounced "DAWL-ton") is a village in Cook County, Illinois, United States. The population was 21,426 at the 2020 census.[2] Dolton is located just west of the expressway Interstate 94 and immediately south of the city limits of Chicago. Its most common ZIP code is 60419.

Dolton is bordered by Chicago to the north, Riverdale and Harvey to the west, South Holland to the south and Calumet City to the east.

History

A post office has been in operation in Dolton since 1854.[3] The village was named for a family of early settlers.[4] The villages of Dolton and nearby Riverdale were effectively one community until each incorporated separately in 1892.[5]

Geography

Dolton is located at 41°37′39″N 87°35′55″W / 41.62750°N 87.59861°W / 41.62750; -87.59861 (41.627509, -87.598512).[6]

According to the 2021 census gazetteer files, Dolton has a total area of 4.69 square miles (12.15 km2), of which 4.57 square miles (11.84 km2) (or 97.50%) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km2) (or 2.50%) is water.[7]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1880448
18901,110147.8%
19001,22910.7%
19101,86952.1%
19202,07611.1%
19302,92340.8%
19403,0584.6%
19505,33874.6%
196018,746251.2%
197025,93738.4%
198024,766−4.5%
199023,956−3.3%
200025,6146.9%
201023,153−9.6%
202021,426−7.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2010[9] 2020[10]

As of the 2020 census[11] there were 21,426 people, 7,985 households, and 5,361 families residing in the village. The population density was 4,570.39 inhabitants per square mile (1,764.64/km2). There were 8,768 housing units at an average density of 1,870.31 per square mile (722.13/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 90.69% African American, 3.25% White, 0.17% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.62% from other races, and 3.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.37% of the population.

There were 7,985 households, out of which 54.29% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 25.45% were married couples living together, 35.94% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.86% were non-families. 29.42% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.44 and the average family size was 2.78.

The village's age distribution consisted of 24.8% under the age of 18, 10.7% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 27% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 86.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.5 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $50,237, and the median income for a family was $57,634. Males had a median income of $33,939 versus $33,354 for females. The per capita income for the village was $22,135. About 15.4% of families and 22.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.8% of those under age 18 and 13.2% of those age 65 or over.

Dolton village, Illinois – Racial and Ethnic Composition
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos may be of any race.
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[9] Pop 2020[10] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 1,226 598 5.30% 2.79%
Black or African American alone (NH) 20,932 19,322 90.41% 90.18%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 14 19 0.06% 0.09%
Asian alone (NH) 68 38 0.29% 0.18%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 3 1 0.01% 0.00%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 24 107 0.10% 0.50%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 264 404 1.14% 1.89%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 622 937 2.69% 4.37%
Total 23,153 21,426 100.00% 100.00%

Government

Dolton is in Illinois's 2nd congressional district and the 15th State Senate District. Approximately 3/4 of the village is within the Illinois Legislature's 29th Representative District, with the remainder in the 30th district. The village is split evenly between the Cook County Judicial Circuit 1st Subcircuit and 2nd Subcircuit.

Most of the village is part of the Dolton Park District, with a small portion served by the Calumet Memorial Park District. The entire village is part of the Dolton Public Library District and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District.[12]

Mayors of Dolton

Education

Dolton is served primarily by Dolton School District 148 and Dolton School District 149. A small portion of the village is within South Holland School District 151. High school students are served by Thornton Township High School District Number 205, which operates Thornridge High School in Dolton.

The entire village is part of South Suburban Community College District 510.[12]

Notable people

Dolton is the hometown of former NFL star Donovan McNabb, At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper co-host Richard Roeper, actress Jane Lynch, news anchor Susan Carlson, and Los Angeles Times editor-in-chief Jim Kirk. William Shaw, Illinois state legislator, served as the first African-American mayor of Dolton.[15] He was followed as mayor by Ronnie Lewis who was the first African-American to serve as an official in the Dolton government.[16] Nelsan Ellis, who played Lafayette Reynolds in True Blood, grew up there.[17] R. Bruce Waddell, Illinois state representative and businessman, was born in Dolton.[18]

References

  1. ^ "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  2. ^ "Dolton village, Illinois, Illinois profile". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  3. ^ "Cook County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved November 4, 2015.
  4. ^ Callary, Edward (September 29, 2008). Place Names of Illinois. University of Illinois Press. p. 95. ISBN 978-0-252-09070-7.
  5. ^ "Dolton, IL". Encyclopedia of Chicago.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. ^ Bureau, US Census. "Gazetteer Files". Census.gov. Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  8. ^ "Decennial Census of Population and Housing by Decades". US Census Bureau.
  9. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Dolton village, Illinois". United States Census Bureau.
  10. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Dolton village, Illinois". United States Census Bureau.
  11. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved June 28, 2022.
  12. ^ a b Cook County Clerks Office Archived August 1, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ Srinivasan, Kirstin (February 25, 2009). "Dolton: Lewis Staves Off Challenger Rogers in Mayoral Primary Challenge". The Times (Munster). pp. A1, A4 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Educator was Suburb's First Black Official". The Chicago Tribune . December 8, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ 'William "Bill" Shaw: 1937-2008,' Chicago Tribune, Rick Pearson and Stacy St. Clair, November 28, 2008
  16. ^ Tejada, Gregory (December 8, 2014). "Educator was Suburb's First Black Official". The Chicago Tribune – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Parker, Ryan (July 8, 2017). "'True Blood' Star Nelsan Ellis Dies at 39". Hollywood Reporter.
  18. ^ 'Illinois Blue Book 1977-1978,' Biographical Sketch of R. Bruce Waddell, pg. 133