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Taharqa offering before Hemen. Statue from the Louvre.
Taharqa offering before Hemen. Statue from the Louvre.
Different perspective showing Hemen in more detail.
Different perspective showing Hemen in more detail.

In Egyptian mythology, Hemen was a falcongod.

Places of worship

Often worshipped as a divine entity unified with Horus, as Horus-Hemen lord of Asphynis[1] or Horakhte-Hemen of Hefat.[2][3][4] Flinders Petrie refers to Hemen as a god of Tuphium. Hemen is also used for the name of a town of ancient Egypt (as mentioned by Flinders Petrie during his studies of Abydos).[5]

Some examples of artifacts containing references to Hemen

Hemen is mentioned in a limited number of inscriptions and texts. Some of these include:

See also

References

  1. ^ The Griffiths Institute
  2. ^ a b "Text of Hor-nefer". Archived from the original on 2012-03-03. Retrieved 2010-04-29.
  3. ^ The Griffiths Institute formerly in V. Golenishchev colln. 4157, now in Moscow, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts
  4. ^ Henri Wild, Statue de Hor-Néfer au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne, BIFAO 54 (1954) pp.173-222 via Text of Hornefer Archived 2012-03-03 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Mentioned in Jean Capart, Primitive art in Egypt , 1905, accessed at Primitive Art in Egypt retrieved 12/09/2011
  6. ^ "Pyramid Texts Online - English Translation".
  7. ^ J.M.A. Janssen, Annual Egyptological Bibliography, 1947
  8. ^ Griffith Institute working document on Stela, page 208. retrieved 20/09/2011
  9. ^ Elizabeth Frood, John Baines, Biographical texts from Ramessid Egypt, 2007
  10. ^ location (listed 14th on page)Statues of Deities), Oxford: Griffith Institute, 1999 Archived 2011-07-25 at the Wayback Machine ISBN 0-900416-69-6 retrieved 20/09/2011
  11. ^ (with D. Magee and E. Miles) Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs and Paintings, viii, Objects of Provenance Not Known, Part 2. Private Statues (Dynasty XVIII to the Roman Period). Statues of Deities. Oxford: Griffith Institute. 1999. ISBN 0-900416-69-6 description of statue from page 1041 of Griffiths Institute of Oxford retrieved 20/09/2011
  12. ^ Kim Ryholt, A Pair of Oracle Petitions Addressed to Horus-of-the-Camp, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 79 (1993), pp. 189-198
  13. ^ (with D. Magee and E. Miles) Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs and Paintings, viii, Objects of Provenance Not Known, Part 2. Private Statues (Dynasty XVIII to the Roman Period). Statues of Deities. Oxford: Griffith Institute. 1999. ISBN 0-900416-69-6 description of statue from page 1041 of Griffiths Institute of Oxford retrieved 20/09/2011

Further reading