This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (October 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
AbbreviationICAN
Formation2007; 15 years ago (2007)
Founded atMelbourne, Australia
TypeNon-profit international campaign
HeadquartersGeneva, Switzerland
FieldsNuclear disarmament
Membership (2017)
468 partner organisations in 101 countries
Executive director
Beatrice Fihn
Award(s)2017 Nobel Peace Prize
Websitewww.icanw.org

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (abbreviated to ICAN, pronounced /ˈkæn/ EYE-kan) is a global civil society coalition working to promote adherence to and full implementation of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.[1] The campaign helped bring about this treaty. ICAN was launched in 2007 and counts 607 partner organizations in 106 countries as of 2021.

The campaign received the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize "for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons."[2]

Mission

ICAN seeks to shift the disarmament debate to focus on the humanitarian threat posed by nuclear weapons, drawing attention to their unique destructive capacity, their catastrophic health and environmental consequences, their indiscriminate targeting, the debilitating impact of a detonation on medical infrastructure and relief measures, and the long-lasting effects of radiation on the surrounding area.[3]

Founders of ICAN were inspired by the success of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which was pivotal in bringing about the negotiation of the anti-personnel mine ban treaty in 1997. They sought to establish a similar campaign model.[4]

Formation

Launch of the ICAN in Melbourne, Australia, in 2007.
Launch of the ICAN in Melbourne, Australia, in 2007.

In September 2006, the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, itself awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985, adopted a proposal at its biennial congress in Helsinki, Finland, to launch ICAN globally.[5] ICAN was launched publicly at two events, the first on 23 April 2007 in Melbourne, Australia, where funds had been raised to establish the campaign, and the second on 30 April 2007 in Vienna at a meeting of State parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. National campaigns have been organized in dozens of countries in every region of the world.[citation needed]

Membership and support

.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Formally endorsed ICAN Humanitarian Pledge.   Voted in favour of Pledge resolution.   Have a nuclear programme, no Pledge endorsement.   Host nuclear weapons, no Pledge endorsement.   In a nuclear alliance, no Pledge endorsement.
  Formally endorsed ICAN Humanitarian Pledge.
  Voted in favour of Pledge resolution.
  Have a nuclear programme, no Pledge endorsement.
  Host nuclear weapons, no Pledge endorsement.
  In a nuclear alliance, no Pledge endorsement.

The ICAN is made up of 607 partner organizations in 106 countries.[6] The campaign's staff team is located in Geneva, Switzerland, from where it provides ongoing coordination and management of the campaign. Beatrice Fihn is the Executive Director.

An International Steering Group oversees the campaign, with current members the Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy, Article 36, African Council of Religious Leaders – Religions for Peace, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, Norwegian People's Aid, Pacific Network on Globalisation (PANG), PAX, Peace Boat, Latin America Human Security Network (SEHLAC), Swedish Physicians against Nuclear Weapons, and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.[7]

Akira Kawasaki (President), Clara Levin (Treasurer) and Rebecca Johnson (Secretary) are responsible for the Swiss-registered non-profit association of ICAN as of 2021.

Milestones

ICAN campaigners in Mexico in 2014.
ICAN campaigners in Mexico in 2014.

Supporters

Michael Douglas with the ICAN executive director Beatrice Fihn.
Michael Douglas with the ICAN executive director Beatrice Fihn.

A number of prominent individuals have lent their support to the campaign, including Nobel Peace Prize laureates Desmond Tutu, the Dalai Lama and Jody Williams, the musician Herbie Hancock, the cricket journalist and former player Ian Chappell,[19] the actors Martin Sheen and Michael Douglas, and the artist Yoko Ono.

In November 2012, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, praised ICAN and its partners "for working with such commitment and creativity in pursuit of our shared goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world".[20] Earlier, he had provided a video message to ICAN in support of its global day of action.[21]

In 2017 ICAN was awarded the Golden Doves for Peace journalistic prize issued by the Italian Research Institute Archivio Disarmo.[22]

2017 Nobel Peace Prize

Main article: 2017 Nobel Peace Prize

The ICAN organization was awarded the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize, on 6 October 2017. The Nobel Peace Prize Press Statement reads: "for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons [...] It is the firm conviction of the Norwegian Nobel Committee that ICAN, more than anyone else, has in the past year given the efforts to achieve a world without nuclear weapons a new direction and new vigour".[23]

The Economist expressed skepticism about the effectiveness of ICAN's nuclear-ban treaty, arguing that it was unlikely to advance global peace due to its rejection by the world's nuclear powers.[24]

The Nobel Prize has brought significant attention to ICAN's core issues, and membership of affiliate groups and partners have jumped to over 450 organisation worldwide, bringing the core issues squarely into remit of international law.[25]

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ "United Nations Conference to Negotiate a Legally Binding Instrument to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons, Leading Towards their Total Elimination, 27 April to 22 May 2015". www.un.org. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  2. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 2017". www.nobelprize.org. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  3. ^ IPPNW (2016). "The health and humanitarian case for banning and eliminating nuclear weapons" (PDF). www.ippnw.org. IPPNW. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  4. ^ "The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons" Archived 10 May 2017 at the Wayback Machine, Ronald McCoy, 30 April 2016.
  5. ^ Campaign milestones 2006 ICAN website
  6. ^ "Partner Organizations".
  7. ^ "About ICAN - People and Structure".((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ "The Treaty - ICAN".((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ "UN: Nuclear weapons ban treaty to enter into force". AP NEWS. 24 October 2020. Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  10. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 2017 - Press Release". www.nobelprize.org. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  11. ^ "United Nations Conference to Negotiate a Legally Binding Instrument to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons, Leading Towards their Total Elimination, 27 April to 22 May 2015". www.un.org. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  12. ^ "Samoa signs the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons | Samoa". www.un.int. Retrieved 14 May 2021.
  13. ^ ICAN (23 December 2016). "UN General Assembly approves historic resolution". www.icanw.org. ICAN. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  14. ^ ICAN (19 August 2016). "Majority of UN members declare intention to negotiate ban on nuclear weapons in 2017". www.icanw.org. ICAN. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  15. ^ "Peace Magazine v32n1p02: Newsworthy". peacemagazine.org. Retrieved 14 May 2021.
  16. ^ "Humanitarian Pledge" (PDF). Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. 9 December 2014. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  17. ^ "Don't Bank on the Bomb". PAX/ICAN. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  18. ^ "Working towards the elimination of nuclear weapons; Council of Delegates 2011: Resolution 1". International Committee of the Red Cross. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  19. ^ The Australian Nobel Peace Prize Aussie born international campaign to abolish nuclear weapons 6 October 2017
  20. ^ Letter from the UN Secretary-General, sent to ICAN, 2 November 2012
  21. ^ Ban Ki-moon's message to ICAN, June 2010
  22. ^ "ICAN wins Golden Doves for Peace award | ICAN". www.icanw.org. Archived from the original on 23 October 2017.
  23. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize for 2017". The Norwegian Nobel Committee. 6 October 2017. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  24. ^ "This year's Nobel peace prize rewards a nice but pointless idea". The Economist. 6 October 2017.
  25. ^ "ICAN champions grass-roots efforts to persuade Japan and others to support a nuclear-free world". 6 August 2018.
Awards and achievements Preceded byJuan Manuel Santos Laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize 2017 Incumbent