The Norwegian Nobel Institute assists the Norwegian Nobel Committee in selecting recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize and in organising the annual award in Oslo.
The Norwegian Nobel Institute assists the Norwegian Nobel Committee in selecting recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize and in organising the annual award in Oslo.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee awards the Nobel Peace Prize annually "to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses".[1] As dictated by Nobel's will, the award is administered by the Norwegian Nobel Committee and awarded by a committee of five people elected by the Parliament of Norway.[2]

Each recipient receives a medal, a diploma, and a monetary award prize (that has varied throughout the years).[3] It is one of the five prizes established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel (who died in 1896), awarded for outstanding contributions in chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine.[4]

Overview

The Peace Prize is presented annually in Oslo, in the presence of the King of Norway, on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death, and is the only Nobel Prize not presented in Stockholm.[5] Unlike the other prizes, the Peace Prize is occasionally awarded to an organisation (such as the International Committee of the Red Cross, a three-time recipient) rather than an individual.

The Nobel Peace Prize was first awarded in 1901 to Frédéric Passy and Henry Dunant — who shared a Prize of 150,782 Swedish kronor (equal to 7,731,004 kronor in 2008) — and, Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov most recently, in 2021.

Laureates

As of 2021, the Peace Prize has been awarded to 109 individuals and 25 organizations. Eighteen women have won the Nobel Peace Prize, more than any other Nobel Prize.[7] Only two recipients have won multiple Peace Prizes: the International Committee of the Red Cross has won three times (1917, 1944 and 1963) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has won twice (1954 and 1981).[6] There have been 19 years in which the Peace Prize was not awarded.

Year Laureate (birth/death) Country Rationale
1901
Jean Henri Dunant.jpg
Henry Dunant
(1828–1910)
Switzerland "for his humanitarian efforts to help wounded soldiers and create international understanding"[8][9]
Frederic Passy.jpg
Frédéric Passy
(1822–1912)
France "for his lifelong work for international peace conferences, diplomacy and arbitration."[8][9]
1902
Ducommun.jpg
Élie Ducommun
(1833–1906)
Switzerland "for his untiring and skilful directorship of the Bern Peace Bureau"[8][10]
Charles Albert Gobat2.jpg
Charles Albert Gobat
(1843–1914)
"for his eminently practical administration of the Inter-Parliamentary Union."[8][10]
1903
Cremer.jpg
William Randal Cremer
(1828–1908)
United Kingdom "for his longstanding and devoted effort in favour of the ideas of peace and arbitration."[8][11]
1904
Logo of Institut de Droit International.svg
Institute of International Law
(founded 1873)
Belgium "for its striving in public law to develop peaceful ties between nations and to make the laws of war more humane."[8][12]
1905
Bertha von Suttner nobel.jpg
Bertha von Suttner
(1843–1914)
Austria-Hungary "for her audacity to oppose the horrors of war."[8][13]
1906
President Roosevelt - Pach Bros.jpg
Theodore Roosevelt
(1858–1919)
United States "for his role in bringing to an end the bloody war recently waged between two of the world's great powers, Japan and Russia."[8][14]
1907
Ernesto Teodoro Moneta.jpg
Ernesto Teodoro Moneta
(1833–1918)
Italy "for his work in the press and in peace meetings, both public and private, for an understanding between France and Italy"[8][15]
Louis Renault jurist.gif
Louis Renault
(1843–1918)
France "for his decisive influence upon the conduct and outcome of the Hague and Geneva Conferences."[8][15]
1908
KParnoldson.jpg
Klas Pontus Arnoldson
(1844–1916)
Sweden "for their long time work for the cause of peace as politicians, peace society leaders, orators and authors."[8][16]
Fredrik Bajer nobel.jpg
Fredrik Bajer
(1837–1922)
Denmark
1909
Beernaert.gif
Auguste Beernaert
(1829–1912)
Belgium "for their prominent position in the international movement for peace and arbitration."[8][17]
PaulBalluet.gif
Paul Henri d'Estournelles de Constant
(1852–1924)
France
1910
IPB logo svg.svg
Permanent International Peace Bureau
(founded 1891)
Switzerland "for acting as a link between the peace societies of the various countries, and helping them to organize the world rallies of the international peace movement."[18][19]
1911
TMCasser.jpg
Tobias Asser
(1838–1913)
Netherlands "for his role as co-founder of the Institut de droit international, initiator of the Conferences on International Private Law (Conférences de Droit international privé) at the Hague, and pioneer in the field of international legal relations"[8][20]
Alfred Hermann Fried nobel.jpg
Alfred Fried
(1864–1921)
Austria-Hungary
"for his effort to expose and fight what he considers to be the main cause of war, namely, the anarchy in international relations."[8][20]
1912
Elihu Root, 1845-1937, bust portrait, facing left.jpg
Elihu Root[A]
(1845–1937)
United States "for bringing about better understanding between the countries of North and South America and initiating important arbitration agreements between the United States and other countries."[8][21]
1913
HenriLaFontaine.jpg
Henri La Fontaine
(1854–1943)
Belgium "for his unparalleled contribution to the organization of peaceful internationalism."[8][22]
1914 Not awarded due to World War I.
1915
1916
1917
Emblem of the ICRC.svg
International Committee of the Red Cross
(founded 1863)
Switzerland "for the efforts to take care of wounded soldiers and prisoners of war and their families."[8][23]
1918 Not awarded due to World War I.
1919
President Woodrow Wilson.jpg
Woodrow Wilson[A]
(1856–1924)
United States "for his role as founder of the League of Nations."[8][24]
1920
Léon Bourgeois 1917.jpg
Léon Bourgeois
(1851–1925)
France "for his longstanding contribution to the cause of peace and justice and his prominent role in the establishment of the League of Nations."[8][25]
1921
Hjalmar branting stor bild.jpg
Hjalmar Branting
(1860–1925)
Sweden "for their lifelong contributions to the cause of peace and organized internationalism."[8][26]
Christian Lous Lange.jpg
Christian Lange
(1869–1938)
Norway
1922
Fridtjof Nansen LOC 03377u-3.jpg
Fridtjof Nansen
(1861–1930)
Norway "for his leading role in the repatriation of prisoners of war, in international relief work and as the League of Nations' High Commissioner for refugees."[27][28]
1923 Not awarded
1924
1925
Austen Chamberlain nobel.jpg
Sir Austen Chamberlain[A]
(1863–1937)
United Kingdom "for his crucial role in bringing about the Locarno Treaty."[8][29]
Chas G Dawes-H&E.jpg
Charles Gates Dawes[A]
(1865–1951)
United States "for his crucial role in bringing about the Dawes Plan."[8][29]
1926
Aristide Briand 2.jpg
Aristide Briand
(1862–1932)
France "for their crucial role in bringing about the Locarno Treaty."[8][30]
Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1989-040-27, Gustav Stresemann.jpg
Gustav Stresemann
(1878–1929)
Germany
1927
Ferdinand Buisson 1924.jpg
Ferdinand Buisson
(1841–1932)
France "for their contribution to the emergence in France and Germany of a public opinion which favours peaceful international cooperation."[8][31]
Ludwig Quidde nobel.jpg
Ludwig Quidde
(1858–1941)
Germany
1928 Not awarded
1929
Portrait of Frank B. Kellogg.jpg
Frank Billings Kellogg[A]
(1856–1937)
United States "for his crucial role in bringing about the Briand-Kellogg Pact."[8][32]
1930
Nathan Söderblom nobel.jpg
Nathan Söderblom
(1866–1931)
Sweden "for promoting Christian unity and helping create 'that new attitude of mind which is necessary if peace between nations is to become reality'."[8][33]
1931
Jane Addams profile.jpg
Jane Addams
(1860–1935)
United States "for their assiduous effort to revive the ideal of peace and to rekindle the spirit of peace in their own nation and in the whole of mankind."[8][34]
Nicholas Murray Butler 1924.jpg
Nicholas Murray Butler
(1862–1947)
United States
1932 Not awarded
1933
Norman Angell 01.jpg
Sir Norman Angell[A]
(1872–1967)
United Kingdom "for having exposed by his pen the illusion of war and presented a convincing plea for international cooperation and peace."[35]
1934
1910 Arthur Henderson.jpg
Arthur Henderson
(1863–1935)
United Kingdom "for his untiring struggle and his courageous efforts as Chairman of the League of Nations Disarmament Conference 1931-34."[8][36][37]
1935
Carl von Ossietzky.jpg
Carl von Ossietzky[A][B]
(1889–1938)
Germany "for his burning love for freedom of thought and expression and his valuable contribution to the cause of peace."[8][38]
1936
Carlos Saavedra Lamas.jpg
Carlos Saavedra Lamas
(1878–1959)
Argentina "for his role as father of the Argentine Antiwar Pact of 1933, which he also used as a means to mediate peace between Paraguay and Bolivia in 1935."[8][39]
1937
Lord Robert Cecil.jpg
The Viscount Cecil of Chelwood
(1864–1958)
United Kingdom "for his tireless effort in support of the League of Nations, disarmament and peace."[8][40]
1938
Nansen Refugee Award.svg
Nansen International Office for Refugees
(1930–1939)
League of Nations "for having carried on the work of Fridtjof Nansen to the benefit of refugees across Europe."[41]
1939 Not awarded due to World War II.
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
Emblem of the ICRC.svg
International Committee of the Red Cross[A]
(founded 1863)
Switzerland "for the great work it has performed during the war on behalf of humanity."[42][43]
1945
Hull-Cordell-LOC.jpg
Cordell Hull
(1871–1955)
United States "for his indefatigable work for international understanding and his pivotal role in establishing the United Nations."[44]
1946
EmilyGreeneBalch.jpg
Emily Greene Balch
(1867–1961)
United States "for her lifelong work for the cause of peace"[45]
John Raleigh Mott.jpg
John Raleigh Mott
(1865–1955)
United States "for his contribution to the creation of a peace-promoting religious brotherhood across national boundaries."[45]
1947
Quaker star-T.svg
The Quakers (represented by Friends Service Council and American Friends Service Committee)[46][47]
(started during the mid-1600s)
United States & United Kingdom "for their pioneering work in the international peace movement and compassionate effort to relieve human suffering, thereby promoting the fraternity between nations."[48]
1948 Not awarded because "there was no suitable living candidate." (A tribute to the recently assassinated Mohandas Gandhi in India.)[49]
1949
John Boyd Orr nobel.jpg
Lord Boyd-Orr
(1880–1971)
United Kingdom "for his lifelong effort to conquer hunger and want, thereby helping to remove a major cause of military conflict and war."[50]
1950
Ralph Bunche - 1963 March on Washington.jpg
Ralph Bunche
(1904–1971)
United States "for his work as mediator in Palestine in 1948-1949."[51]
1951
Léon Jouhaux nobel.jpg
Léon Jouhaux
(1879–1954)
France "for having devoted his life to the fight against war through the promotion of social justice and brotherhood among men and nations."[52]
1952
Albert Schweitzer 1952.jpg
Albert Schweitzer[A]
(1875–1965)
France "for his altruism, reverence for life, and tireless humanitarian work which has helped making the idea of brotherhood between men and nations a living one."[53]
1953
George Catlett Marshall, general of the US army.jpg
George Catlett Marshall Jr.
(1880–1959)
United States "for proposing and supervising the plan for the economic recovery of Europe."[54]
1954
UN emblem blue.svg
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees[A]
(founded 1950)
United Nations "for its efforts to heal the wounds of war by providing help and protection to refugees all over the world."[55]
1955 Not awarded
1956
1957
Lester B. Pearson 1957.jpg
Lester Bowles Pearson
(1897–1972)
Canada "for his crucial contribution to the deployment of a United Nations Emergency Force in the wake of the Suez Crisis."[56][8]
1958
Georges Pire 1958.jpg
Dominique Pire
(1910–1969)
Belgium "for his efforts to help refugees to leave their camps and return to a life of freedom and dignity."[57]
1959
Philip Noel-Baker Anefo.jpg
Philip Noel-Baker
(1889–1982)
United Kingdom "for his longstanding contribution to the cause of disarmament and peace."[58]
1960
Albert Lutuli nobel.jpg
Albert Lutuli[A]
(1898–1967)
South Africa "for his non-violent struggle against apartheid."[59][8]
1961
Dag Hammarskjöld 1961.jpg
Dag Hammarskjöld[C]
(1905–1961)
Sweden "for developing the UN into an effective and constructive international organization, capable of giving life to the principles and aims expressed in the UN Charter."[60][8]
1962
Linus Pauling 1962.jpg
Linus Pauling[A]
(1901–1994)
United States "for his fight against the nuclear arms race between East and West."[61]
1963
Emblem of the ICRC.svg
International Committee of the Red Cross
(founded 1863)
Switzerland "for promoting the principles of the Geneva Convention and cooperation with the UN."[62]
Emblem of the IFRC.svg
League of Red Cross Societies
(founded 1919)
1964
Martin Luther King, Jr..jpg
Martin Luther King, Jr.
(1929–1968)
United States "for his non-violent struggle for civil rights for the Afro-American population."[63]
1965
UNICEF Logo.svg
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
(founded 1946)
United Nations "for its effort to enhance solidarity between nations and reduce the difference between rich and poor states."[64]
1966 Not awarded
1967
1968
René Cassin nobel.jpg
René Cassin
(1887–1976)
France "for his struggle to ensure the rights of man as stipulated in the UN Declaration."[65]
1969
Flag of ILO.svg
International Labour Organization
(founded 1919)
United Nations "for creating international legislation insuring certain norms for working conditions in every country."[66]
1970
Norman Borlaug, 2004 (cropped).jpg
Norman Ernest Borlaug
(1914–2009)
United States "for having given a well-founded hope - the green revolution."[67][8]
1971
Bundesarchiv B 145 Bild-F057884-0009, Willy Brandt.jpg
Willy Brandt
(1913–1992)
West Germany "for paving the way for a meaningful dialogue between East and West."[68]
1972 Not awarded
1973
Henry A Kissinger (cropped).jpg
Henry Kissinger
(born 1923)
United States "for jointly having negotiated a cease fire in Vietnam in 1973."[8][69]
LeDucTho1973.jpg
Lê Đức Thọ[D]
(1911–1990)
North Vietnam
1974
Seán MacBride 1984.jpg
Seán MacBride
(1904–1988)
Ireland "for his efforts to secure and develop human rights throughout the world"[70][8]
Eisaku Sato 19641109.jpg
Eisaku Satō
(1901–1975)
Japan "for his contribution to stabilize conditions in the Pacific rim area and for signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty."[70][8]
1975
RIAN archive 25981 Academician Sakharov.jpg
Andrei Sakharov[E]
(1921–1989)
Soviet Union "for his struggle for human rights in the Soviet Union, for disarmament and cooperation between all nations."[71]
1976
Betty Williams 1996.jpg
Betty Williams
(1943–2020)
United Kingdom "for the courageous efforts in founding a movement to put an end to the violent conflict in Northern Ireland."[72]
Mairead Corrigan Gaza crop.jpg
Mairead Corrigan
(born 1944)
1977 Amnesty International
(founded 1961)
United Kingdom "for worldwide respect for human rights."[8][73]
1978
Sadat 1 (cropped).jpg
Muhammad Anwar el-Sadat
(1918–1981)
Egypt "for jointly having negotiated peace between Egypt and Israel in 1978."[74]
Menachem Begin, Andrews AFB, 1978.JPG
Menachem Begin
(1913–1992)
Israel
1979
Mutter Teresa von Kalkutta.jpg
Mother Teresa
(1910–1997)
India
(Born in Macedonia)
"for her work for bringing help to suffering humanity."[75]
1980
Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, premio Nobel de la Paz en 1980, Visitó al Presidente de la Asamblea Nacional, Fernando Cordero. (5076794488).jpg
Adolfo Pérez Esquivel
(born 1931)
Argentina "for being a source of inspiration to repressed people, especially in Latin America."[76][8]
1981
UN emblem blue.svg
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
(founded 1950)
United Nations "for promoting the fundamental rights of refugees."[77]
1982
Alva Myrdal 1966.jpg
Alva Myrdal
(1902–1986)
Sweden "for their work for disarmament and nuclear and weapon-free zones."[78][79]
Alfonso Garcia Robles 1981.jpg
Alfonso García Robles
(1911–1991)
Mexico
1983
Lech Wałęsa (8036260819).jpg
Lech Wałęsa
(born 1943)
Poland "for non-violent struggle for free trade unions and human rights in Poland."[80]
1984
Desmond Tutu (47327456801) (cropped and adjusted).jpg
Desmond Tutu
(1931–2021)
South Africa "for his role as a unifying leader figure in the non-violent campaign to resolve the problem of apartheid in South Africa"[81]
1985
No image.png
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War
(founded 1980)
United States "for spreading authoritative information and by creating awareness of the catastrophic consequences of nuclear war."[82]
1986
ELIE WIESEL (5112581267).jpg
Elie Wiesel
(1928–2016)
United States (born in Romania) "for being a messenger to mankind: his message is one of peace, atonement and dignity."[83]
1987
Óscar Arias (cropped).jpg
Óscar Arias
(born 1940)
Costa Rica "for his work for lasting peace in Central America."[84]
1988
United Nations Peacekeeping Logo.svg
United Nations Peace-Keeping Forces
(founded 1945)
United Nations "for preventing armed clashes and creating conditions for negotiations."[85][86]
1989
Tenzin Gyatso - Trento 2013 01.JPG
Tenzin Gyatso,
14th Dalai Lama

(born 1935)
India
(Born in Tibet)[87]
"for advocating peaceful solutions based upon tolerance and mutual respect in order to preserve the historical and cultural heritage of his people."[88][89]
1990
Gorbachev (cropped).png
Mikhail Gorbachev
(born 1931)
Soviet Union "for the leading role he played in the radical changes in East-West relations."[90]
1991
Aung San Suu Kyi (December 2011).jpg
Aung San Suu Kyi[F]
(born 1945)
Burma "for her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights."[91]
1992
Rigoberta Menchu.jpg
Rigoberta Menchú
(born 1959)
Guatemala "for her struggle for social justice and ethno-cultural reconciliation based on respect for the rights of indigenous peoples."[92]
1993
Nelson Mandela 1994.jpg
Nelson Mandela
(1918–2013)
South Africa "for their work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa."[93]
F. W. de Klerk 2012.jpg
Frederik Willem de Klerk
(1936–2021)
South Africa
1994
Flickr - Government Press Office (GPO) - THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE LAUREATES FOR 1994 IN OSLO. (cropped).jpg
Yasser Arafat
(1929–2004)
Palestine "for their efforts to create peace in the Middle East."[94]
Flickr - Israel Defense Forces - Life of Lt. Gen. Yitzhak Rabin, 7th IDF Chief of Staff in photos (11).jpg
Yitzhak Rabin
(1922–1995)
Israel
Shimon Peres in Brazil (cropped 2).jpg
Shimon Peres
(1923–2016)
Israel
1995
Josef Rotblat ID badge.png
Joseph Rotblat
(1908–2005)
Poland "for their efforts to diminish the part played by nuclear arms in international politics and, in the longer run, to eliminate such arms."[95]
No image.png
Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs Canada
1996
Carlosbelo.jpg
Carlos Filipe Ximenes Belo
(born 1948)
East Timor "for their work towards a just and peaceful solution to the conflict in East Timor."[96]
José Ramos-Horta Portrait.jpg
José Ramos-Horta
(born 1949)
East Timor
1997
International Campaign to Ban Landmines Logo.svg
International Campaign to Ban Landmines
(founded 1992)
Switzerland "for their work for the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines."[97]
JodyWilliamsMay2010 headcrop.jpg
Jody Williams
(born 1950)
United States
1998
John Hume 2008.jpg
John Hume
(1937–2020)
Ireland "for their efforts to find a peaceful solution to the conflict in Northern Ireland."[98]
Official portrait of Lord Trimble crop 2.jpg
David Trimble
(born 1944)
United Kingdom
1999
MSF International logo .tif
Médecins Sans Frontières Switzerland "in recognition of the organization's pioneering humanitarian work on several continents."[99]
2000
Kim Dae-jung presidential portrait.jpg
Kim Dae-jung
(1924–2009)
South Korea "for his work for democracy and human rights in South Korea and in East Asia in general, and for peace and reconciliation with North Korea in particular."[100]
2001
Emblem of the United Nations.svg
United Nations United Nations "for their work for a better organized and more peaceful world."[101]
Kofi Annan 2012 (cropped).jpg
Kofi Annan
(1938–2018)
Ghana
2002
JimmyCarterPortrait2.jpg
Jimmy Carter
(born 1924)
United States "for his decades of untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development."[102]
2003
Shirin Ebadi - Fronteiras do Pensamento São Paulo 2011 (5839607998, cropped).jpg
Shirin Ebadi
(born 1947)
Iran "for her efforts for democracy and human rights. She has focused especially on the rights of women and children."[103]
2004
Wangari Matthai 2001 (cropped).jpg
Wangari Muta Maathai
(1940–2011)
Kenya "for her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace."[104]
2005
Flag of IAEA.svg
International Atomic Energy Agency
(founded 1957)
United Nations "for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way."[105]
Mohamed ElBaradei, Davos 2.jpg
Mohamed ElBaradei
(born 1942)
Egypt
2006
Yunus, Muhammad (1940).jpg
Muhammad Yunus
(born 1940)
Bangladesh "for their efforts to create economic and social development from below."[106]
Grameen Bank
(founded 1983)
Bangladesh
2007
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Logo.svg
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
(founded 1988)
United Nations "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change."[107]
Al Gore, Vice President of the United States, official portrait 1994.jpg
Al Gore
(born 1948)
United States
2008
Martti Ahtisaari, tidigare president Finland och mottagare av Nobels fredrspris (2).jpg
Martti Ahtisaari
(born 1937)
Finland "for his important efforts, on several continents and over more than three decades, to resolve international conflicts."[108]
2009
President Barack Obama, 2012 portrait crop.jpg
Barack Obama
(born 1961)
United States "for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."[109]
2010 Liu Xiaobo
(1955–2017)
China "for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China."[110]
2011
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf February 2015.jpg
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
(born 1938)
Liberia "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work."[111]
Leymah Gbowee (cropped).jpg
Leymah Gbowee
(born 1972)
Tawakkol Karman (2019) II.jpg
Tawakkul Karman
(born 1979)
Yemen
2012
Flag of Europe.svg
European Union
(founded 1958)
European Union "for over six decades contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe."[112]
2013
HQ of OPCW in The Hague.jpg
Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons
(founded 1997)
Netherlands[113] "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons."[114]
2014
Kailash Satyarthi March 2015.jpg
Kailash Satyarthi
(born 1954)
India "for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education."[115]
Malala Yousafzai at Girl Summit 2014.jpg
Malala Yousafzai
(born 1997)
Pakistan
2015
Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet Visit to Vienna March 2016 (25285867191).jpg
Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet
(2013–2014)
Tunisia "for its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia in the wake of the Jasmine Revolution of 2011."[116]
2016
Juan Manuel Santos and Lula (cropped).jpg
Juan Manuel Santos
(born 1951)
Colombia "for his resolute efforts to bring the country's more than 50-year-long civil war to an end."[117]
2017
Logo ICAN.svg
International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
(founded 2007)
Switzerland "for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons."[118]
2018
Denis Mukwege 2018.jpg
Denis Mukwege
(born 1955)
Democratic Republic of the Congo "for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict."[119]
Nadia Murad, 2015 (cropped).jpg
Nadia Murad
(born 1993)
Iraq
2019
Abiy Ahmed 2019.jpg
Abiy Ahmed
(born 1976)
Ethiopia "for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea."[120]
2020
World Food Programme Logo Simple.svg
World Food Programme
(founded 1961)
United Nations "for its efforts to combat hunger, for its contribution to bettering conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas and for acting as a driving force in efforts to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict."[121]
2021
Maria Ressa.jpg
Maria Ressa
(born 1963)
Philippines "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace."[122]
Dmitry Muratov Four Freedoms Award 2010.jpg
Dmitry Muratov
(born 1961)
Russia

See also

Notes

A The following laureates were all awarded their respective Prizes one year late because the Committee decided that none of the nominations in the year in which they are listed as being awarded the Prize met the criteria in Nobel's will; per its rules the Committee delayed the awarding of the Prizes until the next year, although they were awarded as the previous year's Prize:
Elihu Root (1912),[21] Woodrow Wilson (1919),[24] Austen Chamberlain (1925), Charles G. Dawes (1925),[29] Frank B. Kellogg (1929),[32] Norman Angell (1933),[35] Carl von Ossietzky (1935),[38] International Committee of the Red Cross (1944),[43] Albert Schweitzer (1952),[123] Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (1954),[55] Albert Lutuli (1960),[59] Linus Pauling (1962),[61]
B Carl von Ossietzky's Prize was awarded in absentia because he was imprisoned and was refused a passport by the government of Germany.[124]
C Dag Hammarskjöld's Prize was awarded posthumously.
D Lê Đức Thọ declined to accept the Prize.[69]
E Andrei Sakharov's Prize was awarded in absentia because he was refused a passport by the government of the Soviet Union.[125]
F Aung San Suu Kyi's Prize was awarded in absentia because she was being held prisoner by the government of Burma. Following her release from house arrest and election to the Pyithu Hluttaw, Suu Kyi accepted her award in person on 16 June 2012.[126]
G Liu Xiaobo's Prize was awarded in absentia because he was imprisoned in China.[127]

References

Citations

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