Solitaire has been included in every version of Windows since Windows 3.0, except Windows 8 and 8.1.
Solitaire has been included in every version of Windows since Windows 3.0, except Windows 8 and 8.1.

Video games have been included in versions of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting from Windows 1.0x, all published by Microsoft. Some games that have appeared in Microsoft Entertainment Pack and Microsoft Plus! have been included in subsequent versions of Windows as well. Solitaire has been included in every version of Windows since Windows 3.0, except Windows 8 and 8.1.

History

Microsoft planned to include games when developing Windows 1.0 in 1983–1984. Two games were initially developed, Puzzle and Chess,[1] but were scrapped in favor of Reversi, based on the board game of the same name. Reversi was included in Windows versions up to Windows 3.1. Solitaire was developed in 1988 by the intern Wes Cherry.[2][3][4] The card deck itself was designed by Macintosh pioneer Susan Kare.[5] Cherry's version was to include a boss key that would have switched the game to a fake Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, but he was asked to remove this from the final release.[6]

Microsoft intended Solitaire to "soothe people intimidated by the operating system," and at a time where many users were still unfamiliar with graphical user interfaces, it proved useful in familiarizing them with the use of a mouse, such as the drag-and-drop technique required for moving cards.[7]

According to Microsoft telemetry, Solitaire was among the three most-used Windows programs and FreeCell was seventh, ahead of Microsoft Word and Excel.[8][8] Lost business productivity by employees playing Solitaire has become a common concern since it became standard on Microsoft Windows.[9]

The Microsoft Hearts Network was included with Windows for Workgroups 3.1, as a showcase of NetDDE technology by enabling multiple players to play simultaneously across a computer network.[10] The Microsoft Hearts Network would later be renamed Internet Hearts, and included in Windows Me and XP.

In Minesweeper for Windows Vista and 7, the game comes with an alternate "Flower Garden" style, alongside the default "Minesweeper" style.[11] This is due to controversy over the original land mine theme of the game being potentially insensitive, which was settled by defaulting the appearance based on region so that "sensitive areas" used the "Flower Garden" style.[12]

Support for Internet games on Windows Me and XP ended on July 31, 2019, and Windows 7 on January 22, 2020.[13] 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet is a version of the "Space Cadet" pinball table from the 1995 video game Full Tilt! Pinball.

Several third party games, such as Candy Crush Saga and Disney Magic Kingdoms, have been included as advertisements on the Start menu in Windows 10, and may also be automatically installed by the operating system.[14][15] Windows 11 includes the Xbox app, which allows users to access the PC Game Pass video game subscription service.[16][17]

Microsoft Casual Games

Starting from Windows 8 onwards, updated versions of previously bundled games are now under the brand Microsoft Casual Games, in addition to several brand new games. These games include Solitaire Collection, Minesweeper, Mahjong, and Ultimate Word Games. With the exception of Solitaire Collection being included in Windows 10 and 11, these games are not included with Windows, and are instead available as ad-supported free downloads in Microsoft Store.[18][19]

Premium monthly and annual subscriptions are available, which removes advertisements and offers several gameplay benefits, a move that has been criticized by reviewers as a way to "nickel and dime" users, since previous versions of Solitaire and previously bundled games did not have any advertisements or paid subscriptions.[20]

Included games

Games included with Windows releases
1.0x 2.0x and 2.1x 3.0 3.1[21] NT 3.1, NT 3.5 and NT 3.51 95 NT 4.0 98 2000 Me XP Vista[22] 7[23] 8 and 8.1 10[18] 11
Reversi Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No No
Solitaire No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes[a] Yes[a]
Minesweeper No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No
Internet Hearts No No No Maybe [b] No No No No No Yes Yes No No No No No
FreeCell No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes[a] Yes[a]
Hover! No No No No No Maybe [c] No No No No No No No No No No
3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet No No No No No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No No No
Hearts No No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No
Spider Solitaire No No No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes[a] Yes[a]
Internet Backgammon No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes No Yes No No No
Internet Checkers No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes No Yes No No No
Internet Reversi No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes No No No No No
Internet Spades No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes No Yes No No No
Inkball No No No No No No No No No No Maybe [d] Maybe [e] No No No No
Purble Place No No No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes No No No
Mahjong Titans No No No No No No No No No No No Maybe [e] Maybe [f] No No No
Chess Titans No No No No No No No No No No No Maybe [e] Maybe [f] No No No
Tinker No No No No No No No No No No No Maybe [g] No No No No
Hold 'Em No No No No No No No No No No No Maybe [g] No No No No
Solitaire Collection No No No No No No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f As part of Microsoft Solitaire Collection
  2. ^ Only included with Windows for Workgroups 3.1
  3. ^ Only included with CD-ROM version
  4. ^ Only included with Tablet PC Edition
  5. ^ a b c Only included with Home Premium, Business, Ultimate, and Enterprise editions
  6. ^ a b Only included with Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate, and Enterprise editions
  7. ^ a b Only included with Ultimate edition

References

  1. ^ "PUZZLE on Windows 1.01, Windows 2.03 and Windows 3.00 – BetaArchive". www.betaarchive.com. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  2. ^ Farokhmanesh, Megan (April 13, 2017). "A bored intern created the original Windows Solitaire". The Verge. Vox Media.
  3. ^ Cherry, Wes. "Interview with Wes Cherry – B3TA.com 2008". B3ta.com. Retrieved August 22, 2014.
  4. ^ "Wes Cherry on Reddit about Solitaire". January 4, 2016.
  5. ^ "Susan Kare personal website showing her design for Microsoft Solitaire". Kare.com. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved August 22, 2014.
  6. ^ Warren, Tom (May 22, 2020). "Microsoft Solitaire turns 30 years old today and still has 35 million monthly players". The Verge. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  7. ^ Garreau, Joel (March 9, 1994). "Office Minefield". The Washington Post.
  8. ^ a b Dear, Brian (2017). "27. Leaving the Nest". The Friendly Orange Glow. New York: Pantheon Books. pp. 502–503. ISBN 978-1-101-87156-0.
  9. ^ Church, George J. (October 12, 1998). "Quarterly Business Report: Do Computers Really Save Money?". Time. Time Inc. Archived from the original on November 7, 2007.
  10. ^ Craig Stinson (June 15, 1993). "Open Windows for Workgroups". PC Magazine. p. 292. Retrieved January 20, 2017.
  11. ^ "Column from Tony "Tablesaw" Delgado about puzzle games". Gamesetwatch.com. February 26, 2007. Archived from the original on October 11, 2018. Retrieved June 22, 2011.
  12. ^ Kaushik (February 10, 2010). "The Minesweeper Controversy: How Flower Garden came into Windows Vista". Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  13. ^ "Farewell to Microsoft Internet Games on Windows XP, Windows ME, and Windows 7". Microsoft Community. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  14. ^ Webster, Andrew (May 14, 2015). "Candy Crush will be automatically installed on Windows 10". The Verge. Retrieved October 31, 2021.
  15. ^ Bott, Ed. "Avoid Windows 10 crapware: How to get rid of Candy Crush and all the rest". ZDNet. Retrieved October 31, 2021.
  16. ^ Tuttle, Will (October 4, 2021). "Available Now: Windows 11 is Built for Gaming". Xbox Wire. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  17. ^ Minor, Jordan (November 23, 2021). "With Windows 11, Microsoft Makes Every PC an Xbox". PCMag India. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  18. ^ a b "Microsoft is bringing Solitaire back to Windows 10 – The Verge". April 23, 2015. Retrieved September 5, 2021.
  19. ^ "Microsoft Casual Games FAQ". Microsoft. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  20. ^ Walker, Alissa (July 29, 2015). "If You Want Microsoft Solitaire Ad-Free It'll Cost You $10/Year". Gizmodo. Gawker Media.
  21. ^ "Microsoft Reversi for Windows 3.x – Archive". 1990. Retrieved August 22, 2021.
  22. ^ "Which Games Come With Windows Vista?". Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  23. ^ "Learn about games in Windows 7". Archived from the original on June 9, 2016. Retrieved August 28, 2021.