Warren K. Leffler's photograph of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom at the National Mall
Warren K. Leffler's photograph of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom at the National Mall

Beginning with the murder of Emmett Till in 1955, photography and photographers played an important role in advancing the civil rights movement by documenting the public and private acts of racial discrimination against African Americans and the nonviolent response of the movement. This article focuses on these photographers and the role that they played in the movement between 1954 and 1968, particularly in the South.

Notable photographers and the roles they played

See also

References

  1. ^ "James H. Barker – Artists – Steven Kasher Gallery". www.stevenkasher.com. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  2. ^ "Bob Fitch Photos – Civil Rights, Farm Workers, Catholic Workers, Peace & Justice Movements". Bob Fitch Photo.
  3. ^ "The Photography of Jack T. Franklin". The Philadelphia Inquirer.
  4. ^ Berger, Maurice (October 24, 2017). "Finding Inspiration in the Struggle at Resurrection City". Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  5. ^ Drabble, Jenny. "Former AP photographer gives talk on meeting Martin Luther King Jr., other civil rights activists". Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved 2017-01-16.
  6. ^ Berger, Maurice (May 9, 2014). "A Cultural History of Civil Rights". Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  7. ^ "Behold the People". Briscoe Centre for American History. Retrieved May 10, 2020.
  8. ^ "In Memoriam: R. C. Hickman, 1922–2007". Briscoe Centre for American History. Retrieved May 10, 2020.
  9. ^ Schwab, Katharine (22 July 2013). "Photographer David Johnson in spotlight". SFGate.
  10. ^ Loke, Margarett (2002-04-05). "James Karales, Photographer of Social Upheaval, Dies at 71". The New York Times.
  11. ^ "Selma to Montgomery: A March for the Right to Vote". The Spider Martin Civil Rights Collection. Retrieved 2006-01-04.
  12. ^ "About Charles Moore". Kodak. Retrieved 2006-12-26.
  13. ^ "We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era". LBJ Library and Museum. Archived from the original on 2002-10-17. Retrieved 2007-03-01.
  14. ^ Horne, Madison. "An Intimate View of MLK Through the Lens of a Friend". HISTORY. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  15. ^ Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, UT Austin (2014-08-04). "Flip Schulke – Photojournalism – Strengths – Collections". www.cah.utexas.edu. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  16. ^ "Night Watch". Life. 9 November 1953. p. 57 – via Internet Archive.
  17. ^ "From The Vault Of Art Shay: The Dream Still Persists". The Chicagoist. Archived from the original on July 25, 2017. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  18. ^ Fraser, C. Gerald (19 October 1986). "The Vision of Moneta Sleet in Show". The New York Times. Retrieved 2006-12-22.
  19. ^ "Moneta Sleet, photographer of excellence". African American Registry. Archived from the original on 2006-12-06. Retrieved 2006-12-22.
  20. ^ "Maria Varela: The Learning Curve". Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  21. ^ "A Historic Week of Civil Strife". Life. 43 (15): 37–47. 7 October 1957.
  22. ^ Rothman, Lily; Ronk, Liz. "The Lovings: A History-Making Couple". Life.com. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  23. ^ Cunningham, Candace (February 2021). ""Hell is Popping Here in South Carolina": Orangeburg County Black Teachers and Their Community in the Immediate Post-Brown Era"". History of Education Quarterly. 61 (1): 35–62. doi:10.1017/heq.2020.66.

Further reading