Nilamber Dev Sharma
Born(1931-10-06)October 6, 1931
Jammu and Kashmir, India
DiedJune 23, 2020(2020-06-23) (aged 88)
New Delhi
OccupationScholar, writer
Parent(s)Madan Mohan Shastri
AwardsPadma Shri
WebsiteOfficial web site

Nilamber Dev Sharma (October 6, 1931 – June 23 2020) was an Indian scholar and writer of Dogri and English literature, best known for his work, An Introduction to Modern Dogri Literature,[1] the first publication in English about Dogri literature.[2] The Government of India honored Sharma in 2011, with the fourth highest civilian award of Padma Shri.[3]

Biography

Nilamber Dev Sharma was born to a Sanskrit scholar and a renowned astrologer, Madan Mohan Shastri,[4] on 6 October 1931 at Jammu, in the north Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir.[4] He graduated in English literature from the Government Gandhi Memorial College, Jammu (GGMC), continued his studies at the Hindu College, New Delhi from where he obtained a master's degree[2] and started his career as an English lecturer in Kairana, Uttar Pradesh. He also secured an honours degree from the University of Leeds, UK.[2] After a short stay at Kairana, Sharma moved to his alma mater, the Government Gandhi Memorial College, in 1953.[4] Two years later, he joined Jammu and Kashmir Academy of Art, Culture and Languages in 1961 as its deputy secretary[2] and rose to the position of the secretary.[4] Nilamber Dev Sharma was the first convenor of the Dogri Advisory Board when Sahitya Academy officially recognized Dogri in 1969.[4] In 1972, Sharma resigned from the Academy and entered politics, a stay which was short lived.[4]

Sharma is a former director of the Amar Mahal Museum and Library and a former president of Dogri Sanstha.[4] He is credited with several publications[5] including An Introduction to Modern Dogri Literature, A Brief Survey of Dogri (Modern) Literature,[6] An Introduction to Dogri Folk, Literature, Drama and Art,[2] Chete Kish Khatte, Kish Mitthe, Rishtey and Kahani di Tapaash[4] He has edited a number of books for Dogri Sanstha, Jammu[7] and has translated Iyaruingam, an Assamese work by the novelist Birendera Kumar Bhattacharyya.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Nilamber Dev Sharma (1965). An Introduction to Modern Dogri Literature. Kranti Press. ASIN B000KITBKW.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Greater Kashmir". Greater Kashmir. 25 January 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  3. ^ "Padma Shri" (PDF). Padma Shri. 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 11 November 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Daily Excelsior". Daily Excelsior. 14 February 2013. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  5. ^ "List of Books on Abe Books". Abe Books. 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
    - "Worldcat Profile". Worldcat. 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  6. ^ Nilamber Dev Sharma (2002). "A Brief Survey of Dogri (Modern) Literature". Indian Literature. 46 (3): 116–126. JSTOR 23338590.
  7. ^ "Dogri Sanstha". Dogri Sanstha. 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.

Further reading