Pi Hongyan
皮红艳
Hongyan Pi Londres 2012.jpg
Personal information
CountryFrance
Born (1979-01-25) 25 January 1979 (age 43)
Chongqing, China
Height1.64 m (5 ft 5 in)
Weight53 kg (117 lb)
Retired2012[1]
HandednessRight
Women's singles
Highest ranking2 (2005[2])
Medal record
Women's badminton
Representing  France
World Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2009 Hyderabad Women's singles
European Championships
Silver medal – second place 2004 Geneva Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2008 Herning Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Manchester Women's singles
Representing  China
Asian Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 1997 Manila Girls' team
Bronze medal – third place 1997 Manila Girls' singles
BWF profile

Pi Hongyan (simplified Chinese: 皮红艳; traditional Chinese: 皮紅艷; pinyin: Pí Hóngyàn; born 25 January 1979) is a former Chinese badminton player, who later represented France.[3]

Career

Pi Hongyan is one of a number of talented Chinese-born badminton players who have emigrated from China, in part, because of the intense competition to gain positions on its national team, and because of the elite status within the sport that such a player is likely to hold in other badminton playing countries. Her titles include women's singles at the U.S. (1999), German (2001, 2002), Bitburger (2001, 2002), Portugal (2001, 2003), Swiss (2001, 2005), Croatian (2003), French (2003, 2004, 2005), Dutch (2004), Denmark (2005), Singapore (2006) and India (2009) Opens. At the biennial European Championships she was a silver medalist in 2004 and a bronze medalist in 2008 and 2010. She was runner-up to China's Xie Xingfang at the prestigious All-England Championships in 2007. Pi has been at least a quarter-finalist in each of the last six consecutive BWF World Championships (2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011), with a bronze medal in 2009, as well as a quarter-finalist at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

Achievements

BWF World Championships

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2009 Gachibowli Indoor Stadium, Hyderabad, India China Xie Xingfang 18–21, 8–21
Bronze
Bronze

European Championships

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2004 Queue d’Arve Sport Center, Geneva, Switzerland Netherlands Mia Audina 1–11, 0–11
Silver
Silver
2008 Messecenter, Herning, Denmark Germany Xu Huaiwen 11–21, 21–4, 18–21
Bronze
Bronze
2010 Manchester Evening News Arena, Manchester, England Germany Juliane Schenk 14–21, 13–21
Bronze
Bronze

Asian Junior Championships

Girls' singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
1997 Ninoy Aquino Stadium, Manila, Philippines China Gong Ruina 6–11, 11–4, 10–12
Bronze
Bronze

BWF Superseries

The BWF Superseries, which was launched on 14 December 2006 and implemented in 2007,[4] was a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF). BWF Superseries levels were Superseries and Superseries Premier. A season of Superseries consisted of twelve tournaments around the world that had been introduced since 2011.[5] Successful players were invited to the Superseries Finals, which were held at the end of each year.

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2007 All England Open China Xie Xingfang 6–21, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2007 French Open China Xie Xingfang 13–21, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2009 Korea Open Denmark Tine Rasmussen 19–21, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF Superseries Finals tournament
  BWF Superseries Premier tournament
  BWF Superseries tournament

BWF Grand Prix

The BWF Grand Prix had two levels, the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It was a series of badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) and played between 2007 and 2017. The World Badminton Grand Prix was sanctioned by the International Badminton Federation from 1983 to 2006.

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
1999 U.S. Open China Wu Huimin 11–8, 11–3 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2001 Swiss Open Germany Xu Huaiwen 7–2, 7–1, 7–5 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2001 German Open Ukraine Elena Nozdran 7–1, 7–5, 7–2 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2001 Denmark Open Denmark Camilla Martin 6–8, 3–7, 0–7 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2002 German Open Netherlands Yao Jie 4–11, 11–9, 11–7 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Chinese Taipei Open Netherlands Mia Audina 13–10, 2–11, 3–11 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2004 Dutch Open Netherlands Yao Jie 11–5, 11–4 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Swiss Open Germany Xu Huaiwen 13–12, 11–6 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Denmark Open Germany Xu Huaiwen 7–11, 11–4, 11–5 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2006 Singapore Open Netherlands Mia Audina 22–20, 22–20 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2007 Chinese Taipei Open Hong Kong Wang Chen 18–21, 21–14, 24–26 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2009 India Open Malaysia Julia Wong Pei Xian 17–21, 21–15, 21–14 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2011 Canada Open Chinese Taipei Cheng Shao-chieh 15–21, 11–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2011 Indonesia Grand Prix Gold China Chen Xiaojia 21–19, 15–21, 17–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
  BWF & IBF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2001 Portugal International Finland Anu Weckström 11–8, 11–1 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2001 BMW Open International Germany Xu Huaiwen 7–4, 3–7, 7–2, 7–3 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2002 BMW Open International Germany Xu Huaiwen 11–9, 11–1 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Portugal International Netherlands Judith Meulendijks 11–5, 11–5 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 French International Netherlands Judith Meulendijks 11–1, 11–5 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Croatian International Wales Kelly Morgan 6–11, 11–5, 11–4 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Mauritius International Japan Kanako Yonekura 5–11, 13–10, 11–4 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 South Africa International Japan Kanako Yonekura 6–11, 11–4, 11–9 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Bitburger International Germany Xu Huaiwen 11–9, 5–11, 5–11 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2004 French International China Chen Lanting 11–5, 11–8 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 French International Denmark Anne Marie Pedersen 11–1, 11–2 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2012 Swedish Masters Czech Republic Kristina Gavnholt 21–13, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner

Mixed doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2001 Portugal International Denmark Kasper Kiim Jensen Germany Björn Siegemund
Germany Nicol Pitro
3–15, 1–15 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2004 Bitburger International France Svetoslav Stoyanov Denmark Rasmus Andersen
Denmark Britta Andersen
2–15, 12–15 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
  BWF International Challenge tournament
  BWF/IBF International Series tournament

Record against selected opponents

Record against year-end Finals finalists, World Championships semi-finalists, and Olympic quarter-finalists.[6]

References

  1. ^ "Another good-bye! French star Pi Hongyan retired from badminton and got a nice "salute" at today's semi-final in Paris". Twitter. Badminton Europe. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  2. ^ ""BWF World Rankings: Ranking week: 3/11/2010". Badminton World Federation. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  3. ^ "Pi Hongyan 皮红艳 Joueuse de badminton". www.50ans-50portraits.com (in French). Archived from the original on 9 November 2019.
  4. ^ "BWF Launches Super Series". Badminton Australia. 15 December 2006. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007.
  5. ^ "Yonex All England Elevated To BWF Premier Super Series Event". IBadmintonstore. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2013.
  6. ^ "PI HONGYAN Head to Head". bwfbadminton.com. Retrieved 10 April 2020.