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A royalist supports a particular monarch as head of state for a particular kingdom, or of a particular dynastic claim. In the abstract, this position is royalism. It is distinct from monarchism, which advocates a monarchical system of government, but not necessarily a particular monarch. Most often, the term royalist is applied to a supporter of a current regime or one that has been recently overthrown to form a republic.

In the United Kingdom, today the term is almost indistinguishable from "monarchist" because there are no significant rival claimants to the throne. Conversely, in 19th-century France, a royalist might be either a Legitimist, Bonapartist, or an Orléanist, all being monarchists.

United Kingdom

Russia

Yugoslavia

France

Main article: Monarchism in France

Low countries

Portugal

Spain

Italy

China

Cambodia

Main article: FUNCINPEC

The FUNCINPEC Party (Khmer: ហ្វ៊ុនស៊ិនប៉ិច; French: Front uni national pour un Cambodge indépendant, neutre, pacifique et coopératif), National United Front for an Independent, Neutral, Peaceful and Cooperative Cambodia is a royalist political party in Cambodia founded in 1981. The party draws its inspiration from the political legacy of the former King of Cambodia, Norodom Sihanouk.

Iran

Main article: Monarchism in Iran

The Constitutionalist Party of Iran (CPI) (Persian: حزب مشروطه ايران - لیبرال دموکرات‎) is a liberal democratic party founded in 1994 (originally as the Constitutional Movement of Iran) and is based in exile. The party favors a constitutional monarchy in Iran but isn't opposed to a republic based on referendum. It also supports returning of current Crown Prince Reza Pahlavi as the next shah of Iran.[1]

United States

Malaysia

Nepal

The Rastriya Prajatantra Party was founded on the principles of democracy, constitutional monarchy, nationalism and economic liberalization.[3] When the monarchy was abolished in 2008 and Nepal was declared a secular state, the Rastriya Prajatantra Party Nepal changed its constitution to support monarchy and the re-establishment of the Hindu state.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Constitutionalist Party of Iran". Archived from the original on 2012-03-04.
  2. ^ "Johor Royalists Club - Royalists in Malaysia".
  3. ^ "Major Political Parties". www.nepaldemocracy.org. Retrieved 2017-06-25.
  4. ^ RPP. "राप्रपा नेपालः सुस्पष्ट बिचार र अलग पहिचान सहितको राजनैतिक दल". RPP. Retrieved 2017-06-25.