Arizona Fall League
Arizona Fall League logo.svg
SportBaseball
Founded1992
No. of teams6
CountryUnited States
Most recent
champion(s)
Mesa Solar Sox (2021)
Most titlesPeoria Javelinas (7)
Official websitewww.mlb.com/arizona-fall-league

The Arizona Fall League (AFL)[a] is an off-season sports league owned and operated by Major League Baseball (MLB) which operates during the autumn in Arizona, United States, at six different baseball complexes. Arizona Fall League rosters are filled by many of the top prospects in Minor League Baseball (MiLB) who are assigned by their parent clubs.

Structure

Jayson Aquino with the Salt River Rafters in 2014 while a member of the Colorado Rockies organization; he made his major league debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2016
Jayson Aquino with the Salt River Rafters in 2014 while a member of the Colorado Rockies organization; he made his major league debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2016
Brandon Marsh (left) and Víctor Víctor Mesa prior to the 2019 Fall Stars Game
Brandon Marsh (left) and Víctor Víctor Mesa prior to the 2019 Fall Stars Game

The six teams of the AFL are organized in two three-team divisions. Each AFL team is affiliated with five teams in Major League Baseball (MLB) , and each MLB team provides seven players from their Minor League Baseball affiliates, yielding 35-man rosters.[1][b] Specific players are invited (not assigned) to play in the AFL by their parent club.[3] The league provides an environment for top prospects to advance their development, in a setting that MLB governs and monitors, as opposed to other offseason leagues (such as the Puerto Rican Winter League) located outside of the contiguous United States.[2]

Player eligibility has changed over time; as of 2008, each MLB organization could only provide one player below the Double-A level,[1] and before 2019 there were service-time limits for any players on the 40-man roster of an MLB team,[3] but as of 2021 all players within an MLB organization are eligible.[3] Free agents are not eligible.[3] The seven players each MLB organization provides consist of four pitchers and three position players.[3] Positional needs for each AFL team (e.g. catchers) are coordinated between player development directors of the affiliated MLB organizations via a "position draft".[3] An MLB organization can assign more than three position players; such players serve as a taxi squad for the AFL team and are limited to playing two games each week.[3]

Play generally begins after the conclusion of the World Series and runs until mid-November, although play continued into early December for the first five seasons that the league operated. Each team plays approximately 30 games; schedule length has varied somewhat during the league's history. Following the end of the league's regular season, the two division winners meet in a championship game.

Players wear uniforms of their respective MLB parent club. The league had its own team-specific uniforms before 1998.[4] The manager, pitching coach, and hitting coach of each AFL team are provided by MLB organizations on a rotating basis.[3]

Each team plays home games at its own ballpark, each of which currently has a seating capacity in excess of 10,000 spectators. For the 2019 season, only four venues were used due to ballpark renovation work.[5]

The league has organized an annual all-star game since 2006.[6] Initially known as the "Rising Stars Showcase",[7] it has been branded as the "Fall Stars Game" since at least 2013.[8] Players for the game are selected by league staff, scouting and farm directors, and MLB.com writers.[9]

History

The league's inaugural season was 1992, during which each team played a 54-game schedule that ended in early December.[10] The divisions and teams that season were:[11]

The league's first game was played on October 6, 1992,[12] with the Grand Canyon Rafters defeating the Scottsdale Scorpions, 6–4.[13]

Before the 1994 season, the Javelinas relocated from Tucson to Peoria, to limit travel distances to the Phoenix metropolitan area.[14] All teams been located in greater Phoenix since then.

Since 1995, when the Diamondbacks became the Desert Dogs, no team has changed its nickname. However, each team has changed its location at least once during its history. The most recent change was by the Desert Dogs, who moved from Phoenix to Glendale in 2013.[15]

Michael Jordan during his time with the Scottsdale Scorpions
Michael Jordan during his time with the Scottsdale Scorpions

For the 1998 season, organizers rostered players onto each Arizona Fall League team from a single division in MLB:[4]

In 2007, the United States national baseball team and China national baseball team played several games against AFL teams;[16] both teams were later competitors in baseball at the 2008 Summer Olympics. In 2019, the Mesa Solar Sox participated in the Vamos a Tucson Mexican Baseball Fiesta in early October, facing teams of the Mexican Pacific League.[17]

In 2019, the league adopted a new logo.[18] In 2020, the season was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[19]

A number of future MLB All-Stars have had stints in the Arizona Fall League; over 300, per the league's website.[2] These include David Wright (2003), Dustin Pedroia (2004), Andre Ethier (2005), Bryce Harper (2010–2011), Nolan Arenado (2011), Mike Trout (2011), Mookie Betts (2013), Aaron Judge (2014), Gleyber Torres (2016), and Ronald Acuña Jr. (2017).[20] In 1994, Michael Jordan played for Scottsdale during his time away from the NBA.[21] Similarly, former NFL quarterback Tim Tebow played for Scottsdale in 2016 during his foray into professional baseball.[22]

Current teams

Each stadium hosts one or two of its MLB affiliates, denoted in bold, during spring training. Each listed city is in Arizona.

Results by season

Results for each team since the league's inaugural 1992 season are listed below. Teams are listed by their nicknames only, independent of location, as various team locations have changed over time. Tie games are not listed, as they are excluded from winning percentage calculations, which determine division standings. The best winning percentage for a season was by the Saguaros who went 26–10 (.722) in 2011, while the worst was by the Saguaros in 2002 with a record of 11–32 (.256).

Through 1997, teams were organized into Northern and Southern divisions. For the 1998 season, American and National divisions were designated. The divisions have been East and West since 1999, except for four seasons (2003–2005 and 2008) when American and National naming was again used.

Division winners appear in bold type. Tie-breaking procedures (such as between the Saguaros and Javelinas in 2021 for the West division title) are unclear.

Year Desert Dogs[c] Javelinas Rafters Saguaros Scorpions Solar Sox Ref.
Record Finish Record Finish Record Finish Record Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1992 20–33 (.377) 3rd South 25–26 (.490) 2nd South 26–27 (.491) 2nd North 33–18 (.647) 1st South 25–28 (.472) 3rd North 28–25 (.528) 1st North [23]
1993 28–21 (.571) 2nd South 32–17 (.653) 1st South 26–22 (.542) 1st North 17–32 (.347) 3rd South 22–27 (.449) 2nd North 21–27 (.438) 3rd North [24]
1994 20–30 (.400) 2nd South 32–19 (.627) 1st North 19–31 (.380) 3rd South 32–18 (.640) 1st South 26–25 (.510) 2nd North 22–28 (.440) 3rd North [25]
1995 23–28 (.451) 2nd South 28–23 (.549) 2nd North 22–28 (.440) 3rd South 33–18 (.647) 1st South 16–34 (.320) 3rd North 30–21 (.588) 1st North [26]
1996 26–25 (.510) 2nd South 25–26 (.490) 2nd North 22–29 (.431) 3rd South 27–24 (.529) 1st South 29–22 (.569) 1st North 25–26 (.490) 3rd North [27]
1997 21–24 (.467) 2nd South 28–17 (.622) 1st North 29–16 (.644) 1st South 15–30 (.333) 3rd South 20–25 (.444) 3rd North 22–23 (.489) 2nd North [28]
1998 21–22 (.488) 3rd AL 23–21 (.523) 2nd AL 26–18 (.591) 1st AL 19–25 (.432) 3rd NL 20–23 (.465) 2nd NL 22–22 (.500) 1st NL [29]
1999 25–19 (.568) 2nd East 17–27 (.386) 3rd West 17–27 (.386) 2nd West 17–27 (.386) 1st West 25–19 (.568) 3rd East 31–13 (.705) 1st East [30]
2000 25–16 (.610) 1st East 19–22 (.463) 2nd West 20–21 (.488) 1st West 19–22 (.463) 3rd West 25–16 (.610) 2nd East 14–26 (.350) 3rd East [31]
2001 25–16 (.610) 1st East 21–10 (.677) 2nd West 26–15 (.634) 1st West 12–29 (.293) 3rd West 22–19 (.537) 2nd East 17–24 (.415) 3rd East [32]
2002 25–19 (.568) 2nd East 26–17 (.605) 1st West 20–23 (.465) 2nd West 11–32 (.256) 3rd West 29–15 (.659) 1st East 19–24 (.442) 3rd East [33]
2003 18–13 (.581) 1st NL 9–22 (.290) 3rd NL 13–18 (.419) 2nd NL 17–16 (.515) 3rd AL 16–15 (.516) 2nd AL 20–13 (.606) 1st AL [34]
2004 21–15 (.583) 1st NL 16–21 (.432) 2nd NL 18–17 (.514) 3rd NL 17–17 (.500) 2nd AL 21–15 (.583) 1st AL 14–22 (.389) 3rd AL [35]
2005 22–10 (.688) 1st NL 17–14 (.548) 2nd NL 16–16 (.500) 3rd NL 8–23 (.258) 3rd AL 17–15 (.531) 1st AL 15–17 (.469) 2nd AL [36]
2006 20–11 (.645) 1st East 14–18 (.438) 3rd West 16–16 (.500) 1st West 15–17 (.469) 2nd West 15–17 (.469) 3rd East 15–16 (.484) 2nd East [37]
2007 20–11 (.645) 1st East 17–15 (.531) 2nd West 19–13 (.594) 1st West 10–22 (.313) 3rd West 16–16 (.500) 2nd East 14–17 (.452) 3rd East [38]
2008 18–18 (.500) 1st NL 16–22 (.421) 2nd NL 12–26 (.316) 3rd NL 26–12 (.684) 2nd AL 14–22 (.389) 3rd AL 26–12 (.684) 1st AL [39]
2009 19–13 (.594) 1st East 18–14 (.563) 1st West 16–16 (.500) 2nd West 14–18 (.438) 3rd West 15–16 (.484) 2nd East 13–18 (.419) 3rd East [40]
2010 11–17 (.393) 3rd East 20–10 (.667) 1st West 17–12 (.586) 2nd West 9–22 (.290) 3rd West 20–12 (.625) 1st East 13–17 (.433) 2nd East [41]
2011 14–22 (.389) 3rd West 16–19 (.457) 2nd West 22–16 (.579) 1st East 26–10 (.722) 1st West 14–22 (.389) 3rd East 17–20 (.459) 2nd East [42]
2012 13–15 (.464) 3rd West 19–13 (.594) 1st West 17–13 (.567) 1st East 17–14 (.548) 2nd West 15–16 (.484) 2nd East 10–20 (.333) 3rd East [43]
2013 13–16 (.448) 2nd West 12–19 (.387) 3rd West 19–12 (.613) 2nd East 18–12 (.600) 1st West 10–21 (.323) 3rd East 19–11 (.633) 1st East [44]
2014 14–15 (.483) 3rd West 15–14 (.517) 1st West 17–11 (.607) 1st East 16–15 (.516) 2nd West 12–20 (.375) 3rd East 15–14 (.517) 2nd East [45]
2015 13–15 (.464) 2nd West 12–15 (.444) 3rd West 16–13 (.552) 2nd East 19–11 (.633) 1st West 18–12 (.600) 1st East 9–21 (.300) 3rd East [46]
2016 17–15 (.531) 2nd West 14–15 (.483) 3rd West 15–15 (.500) 2nd East 17–14 (.548) 1st West 13–18 (.419) 3rd East 16–15 (.516) 1st East [47]
2017 16–14 (.533) 2nd West 18–12 (.600) 1st West 13–15 (.464) 2nd East 13–17 (.433) 3rd West 12–17 (.414) 3rd East 16–13 (.552) 1st East [48]
2018 12–18 (.400) 2nd West 21–9 (.700) 1st West 16–14 (.533) 1st East 11–19 (.367) 3rd West 14–15 (.483) 3rd East 15–14 (.517) 2nd East [49]
2019 14–15 (.483) 2nd West 14–15 (.483) 3rd West 17–11 (.607) 1st East 17–12 (.586) 1st West 12–17 (.414) 3rd East 15–13 (.536) 2nd East [50]
2021 17–13 (.567) 3rd West 17–12 (.586) 2nd West 10–20 (.333) 3rd East 17–12 (.586) 1st West 12–18 (.400) 2nd East 15–13 (.536) 1st East [51]

Championship history

At the conclusion of the league's regular season, the first-place teams from both divisions meet for the league championship. Originally a best-of-three series, it has been played as a single game since 2001. The Peoria Javelinas have won the most championships, seven. The most consecutive championships is five, accomplished by the Phoenix Desert Dogs during 2004–2008. No championship game was held in 2020, as the season was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mike Scioscia was manager of the 1997 champion Peoria Javelinas.
Mike Scioscia was manager of the 1997 champion Peoria Javelinas.
Bob Melvin was manager of the 1999 runner-up Maryvale Saguaros.
Bob Melvin was manager of the 1999 runner-up Maryvale Saguaros.
Season Game date Champion Score Runner-Up Ref.
1992 December 7–9 Sun Cities Solar Sox 2–1 (games) Phoenix Saguaros [52][53]
1993 December 3–5 Tempe Rafters 2–1 (games) Tucson Javelinas [54]
1994 December 2–3 Peoria Javelinas 2–0 (games) Mesa Saguaros [55]
1995 December 1–3 Mesa Saguaros 2–1 (games) Sun Cities Solar Sox [56]
1996 December 7–8 Scottsdale Scorpions 2–0 (games) Mesa Saguaros [57]
1997 November 21–23 Peoria Javelinas 2–1 (games) Grand Canyon Rafters [58]
1998 November 20–21 Sun Cities Solar Sox 2–0 (games) Grand Canyon Rafters [59]
1999 November 19–20 Mesa Solar Sox 2–0 (games) Maryvale Saguaros [60]
2000 November 17–18 Grand Canyon Rafters 2–0 (games) Phoenix Desert Dogs [61]
2001 November 17 Phoenix Desert Dogs 12–8 Grand Canyon Rafters [62][63]
2002 November 23 Peoria Javelinas 7–1 Scottsdale Scorpions [64]
2003 November 15 Mesa Solar Sox 7–2 Mesa Desert Dogs [65]
2004 November 20 Phoenix Desert Dogs 6–2 Scottsdale Scorpions [66]
2005 November 12 Phoenix Desert Dogs 9–3 Surprise Scorpions [67]
2006 November 18 Phoenix Desert Dogs 6–2 Grand Canyon Rafters [68]
2007 November 17 Phoenix Desert Dogs 7–2 Surprise Rafters [69]
2008 November 22 Phoenix Desert Dogs 10–4 Mesa Solar Sox [70]
2009 November 21 Peoria Javelinas 5–4 Phoenix Desert Dogs [71][72]
2010 November 20 Scottsdale Scorpions 3–2 Peoria Javelinas [73]
2011 November 19 Salt River Rafters 9–3 Surprise Saguaros [74]
2012 November 17 Peoria Javelinas 4–3 Salt River Rafters [75]
2013 November 16 Surprise Saguaros 2–0 Mesa Solar Sox [76]
2014 November 15 Salt River Rafters 14–7 Peoria Javelinas [77]
2015 November 21 Scottsdale Scorpions 6–4 Surprise Saguaros [78]
2016 November 19 Mesa Solar Sox 6–1 Surprise Saguaros [79]
2017 November 18 Peoria Javelinas 8–2 Mesa Solar Sox [80]
2018 November 17 Peoria Javelinas 3–2 (10) Salt River Rafters [81]
2019 October 26[d] Salt River Rafters 5–1 Surprise Saguaros [83]
2020 None (season cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic) [84]
2021 November 20 Mesa Solar Sox 6–0 Surprise Saguaros [85]

Appearances by team

Appearances Team Wins Losses Win pct. Seasons
12 Salt River Rafters 5 7 .417 1993, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019
11 Surprise Saguaros 2 9 .182 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2011, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2019, 2021
10 Peoria Javelinas 7 3 .700 1993, 1994, 1997, 2002, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2017, 2018
10 Mesa Solar Sox 6 4 .600 1992, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2008, 2013, 2016, 2017, 2021
9 Glendale Desert Dogs 6 3 .667 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
6 Scottsdale Scorpions 3 3 .500 1996, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2010, 2015

Notes:

Awards

Most Valuable Player award

See also: Baseball awards § Winter leagues (affiliated)

First presented in 2002 and named for Joe Black of the Brooklyn Dodgers, the award honors the 1952 National League Rookie of the Year.[86]

Eric Duncan was league MVP in 2005.
Eric Duncan was league MVP in 2005.
Royce Lewis was league MVP in 2019.
Royce Lewis was league MVP in 2019.
Joe Black MVP Award winners
Year Player Organization Position Team Ref
2002 Ken Harvey Kansas City Royals 1B Scottsdale Scorpions [87]
2003 Jason Dubois Chicago Cubs OF Mesa Solar Sox [87]
2004 Chris Shelton Detroit Tigers DH Grand Canyon Rafters [87]
2005 Eric Duncan New York Yankees 3B Grand Canyon Rafters [87]
2006 Chip Cannon Toronto Blue Jays 1B Phoenix Desert Dogs [87]
2007 Sam Fuld Chicago Cubs OF Mesa Solar Sox [87]
2008 Tommy Hanson Atlanta Braves P Mesa Solar Sox [87]
2009 Grant Desme Oakland Athletics OF Phoenix Desert Dogs [87]
2010 Dustin Ackley Seattle Mariners 2B Peoria Javelinas [88]
2011 Nolan Arenado Colorado Rockies 3B Salt River Rafters [87]
2012 Chris McGuiness Texas Rangers 1B Surprise Saguaros [87]
2013 Kris Bryant Chicago Cubs 3B Mesa Solar Sox [87]
2014 Greg Bird New York Yankees 1B Scottsdale Scorpions [89]
2015 Adam Engel Chicago White Sox OF Glendale Desert Dogs [87]
2016 Gleyber Torres New York Yankees SS Scottsdale Scorpions [90]
2017 Ronald Acuña Jr. Atlanta Braves OF Peoria Javelinas [91]
2018 Keston Hiura Milwaukee Brewers 2B Peoria Javelinas [87]
2019 Royce Lewis Minnesota Twins SS Salt River Rafters [92]
2020 None (season cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic) [84]
2021 Nelson Velázquez Chicago Cubs OF Mesa Solar Sox [93]

Source:[93]

Stenson Award

See also: Baseball awards § Winter leagues (affiliated)

The Dernell Stenson Sportsmanship Award was created in 2004, in memory of Dernell Stenson,[94] an outfielder for the Scottsdale Scorpions (Cincinnati Reds), who was killed in a carjacking on November 5, 2003.[95] The award is voted on by the managers and coaches of the six Arizona Fall League teams.[96]

Mark Teahen won the first Stenson Award in 2004.
Mark Teahen won the first Stenson Award in 2004.
Tyler Stephenson won the Stenson Award in 2019.
Tyler Stephenson won the Stenson Award in 2019.
Stenson Award winners
Year Player Organization Position Team Ref
2004 Mark Teahen Kansas City Royals 3B Phoenix Desert Dogs [96]
2005 Andre Ethier Oakland Athletics OF Phoenix Desert Dogs [96]
2006 Kevin Frandsen San Francisco Giants IF Scottsdale Scorpions [96]
2007 Sam Fuld Chicago Cubs OF Mesa Solar Sox [96]
2008 Jason Donald Philadelphia Phillies IF Mesa Solar Sox [96]
2009 Russ Mitchell Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Peoria Javelinas [96]
2010 Steve Lombardozzi Jr. Washington Nationals 3B Scottsdale Scorpions [96]
2011 Kevin Mattison Miami Marlins OF Surprise Saguaros [96]
2012 Cole Kimball Washington Nationals P Salt River Rafters [96]
2013 Garin Cecchini Boston Red Sox 3B Surprise Saguaros [96]
2014 Patrick Kivlehan Seattle Mariners 3B Surprise Saguaros [97]
2015 Yadiel Rivera Milwaukee Brewers IF Surprise Saguaros [98]
2016 Austin Nola Miami Marlins C Mesa Solar Sox [99]
2017 Eric Filia Seattle Mariners OF Peoria Javelinas [91]
2018 Cole Tucker Pittsburgh Pirates SS Surprise Saguaros [100]
2019 Tyler Stephenson Cincinnati Reds C Glendale Desert Dogs [101]
2020 None (season cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic) [84]
2021 Logan O'Hoppe Philadelphia Phillies C Peoria Javelinas [102]

Performance-based awards

In 2021, the league added several awards: pitcher, hitter, reliever, breakout player, and defensive player of the year.[103] Winners are listed in the below table with their position and major-league organization.

Performance-based award winners
Year Pitcher Hitter Reliever Breakout player Defensive player Ref.
2021 Owen White (RHP, TEX) Juan Yepez (1B, STL)
J. J. Bleday (OF, MIA)
Graham Spraker (RHP, TOR) Elijah Dunham (OF, NYY) Jackson Cluff (SS, WSN) [103]

Hall of Fame

See also: Baseball awards § Winter leagues (affiliated)

The Arizona Fall League Hall of Fame was created in 2001. The AFL has had over 1,200 former players reach Major League Baseball. Additionally, 18 former AFL managers or players have gone on to manage a major league club after managing in the league. To be considered by the selection committee, a player must be recognized at the major league level as a Rookie of the Year, a Most Valuable Player, an All-Star, or a Gold Glove or Silver Slugger Award winner. Through 2019, there were 46 inductees to the hall.[104]

Dusty Baker, manager, inducted 2001
Dusty Baker, manager, inducted 2001
Alfonso Soriano, player, inducted 2006
Alfonso Soriano, player, inducted 2006
Jeff Nelson, umpire, inducted 2018
Jeff Nelson, umpire, inducted 2018
HOF year Inductee Arizona Fall League Ref.
Season Team Role
2001 Dusty Baker 1992 Scottsdale Scorpions Manager [105]
2001 Nomar Garciaparra 1994 Scottsdale Scorpions Shortstop [105]
2001 Derek Jeter 1994 Chandler Diamondbacks Shortstop [105]
2001 Mike Piazza 1992 Sun Cities Solar Sox Catcher [105]
2002 Jason Giambi 1994 Peoria Javelinas First baseman [105]
2002 Jerry Manuel 1994 Maryvale Saguaros Manager [105]
2003 Shawn Green 1992 Scottsdale Scorpions Outfielder [105]
2003 Todd Helton 1996 Peoria Javelinas First baseman [105]
2003 Mike Scioscia 1997 Peoria Javelinas Manager [105]
2004 Garret Anderson 1993 Tempe Rafters Outfielder [105]
2004 Tony Peña 2000 Maryvale Saguaros Manager [105]
2004 Albert Pujols 2000 Scottsdale Scorpions Third baseman [105]
2005 Troy Percival 1992 Scottsdale Scorpions Pitcher [105]
2005 Terry Francona 1992
1994
Grand Canyon Rafters
Scottsdale Scorpions
Coach
Manager
[105]
2006 Roy Halladay 1998 Grand Canyon Rafters Pitcher [105]
2006 Grady Little 1992 Grand Canyon Rafters Manager [105]
2006 Alfonso Soriano 1998 Grand Canyon Rafters Second baseman [105]
2007 Jermaine Dye 1995 Sun Cities Solar Sox Outfielder [105]
2007 Derrek Lee 1995–1996 Sun Cities Solar Sox First baseman [105]
2007 Ken Macha 1994 Tempe Rafters Manager [105]
2007 Torii Hunter 1998 Phoenix Desert Dogs Outfielder [105]
2008 Jimmy Rollins 2000 Maryvale Saguaros Shortstop [105]
2008 Eric Wedge 1993 Tucson Javelinas Catcher [105]
2009 Brian Giles 1994 Sun Cities Solar Sox Outfielder [105]
2010 Chris Carpenter 1996 Phoenix Desert Dogs Pitcher [105]
2010 Michael Young 2000 Grand Canyon Rafters Shortstop [105]
2011 Ryan Howard 2004 Phoenix Desert Dogs First baseman [105]
2011 Paul Konerko 1996 Sun Cities Solar Sox First baseman [105]
2012 Derek Lowe 1993
1995
Sun Cities Solar Sox
Peoria Javelinas
Pitcher [105]
2012 Mark Teixeira 2002 Peoria Javelinas Third baseman [105]
2012 Ron Washington 1992
1993
Sun Cities Solar Sox
Tucson Javelinas
Coach [105]
2013 Darin Erstad 1995 Tempe Rafters Outfielder [105]
2013 Bob Melvin 1999 Maryvale Saguaros Manager [105]
2013 Dustin Pedroia 2004 Scottsdale Scorpions Shortstop [105]
2014 Carl Crawford 2001 Maryvale Saguaros Outfielder [105]
2014 Matt Holliday 2002–2003 Mesa Solar Sox Outfielder [105]
2015 Andrew McCutchen 2007 Phoenix Desert Dogs Outfielder [106]
2015 Chase Utley 2002 Grand Canyon Rafters Third baseman [106]
2016 Adrián González 2003 Peoria Saguaros First baseman [107]
2017 Max Scherzer 2007
2008
Scottsdale Scorpions
Phoenix Desert Dogs
Pitcher [108]
2017 Mike Trout 2011 Scottsdale Scorpions Outfielder [108]
2017 David Wright 2003 Peoria Saguaros Third baseman [108]
2018 Ted Barrett 1993–1995 Umpire [109]
2018 Jeff Nelson 1996 Umpire [109]
2018 Buster Posey 2009 Scottsdale Scorpions Catcher [109]
2019 Steve Cobb 1994–2018 AFL director [104]

All-star game results

Through the 2021 edition, East and West have each won 7 of their 14 contests. The 2008 edition was staged as National vs. American, with the National team prevailing. No game was held in 2020, as the season was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Only one game, the 2007 edition, has gone into extra innings.

Surprise Stadium in 2006
Entrance of Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in 2011
Season Game date Winner Score Loser Venue Ref.
2006 October 27 East 3–1 West Surprise Stadium [110]
2007 October 26 East 3–2 (10) West Surprise Stadium [111]
2008 October 24 National 7–6 American Surprise Stadium [112]
2009 November 7 West 8–7 East Surprise Stadium [113]
2010 November 6 West 3–2 East Surprise Stadium [114]
2011 November 5 West 11–2 East Surprise Stadium [115]
2012 November 3 East 9–4 West Salt River Fields at Talking Stick [116]
2013 November 2 West 9–2 East Surprise Stadium [117]
2014 November 1 East 6–2 West Salt River Fields at Talking Stick [118]
2015 November 7 West 8–3 East Salt River Fields at Talking Stick [119]
2016 November 5 West 12–4 East Surprise Stadium [120]
2017 November 4 East 4–2 West Salt River Fields at Talking Stick [121]
2018 November 3 West 7–6 East Surprise Stadium [122]
2019 October 12 East 4–2 West Salt River Fields at Talking Stick [123]
2020 Not played, season canceled [124]
2021 November 13 East 6–5 West Salt River Fields at Talking Stick [125]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Some websites, such as Baseball-Reference.com, use an abbreviation of AZFL.
  2. ^ The MLB website notes 30-man rosters for each AFL team,[2] but this is inconsistent with contemporary sourcing.[3]
  3. ^ The Desert Dogs were known as the Diamondbacks during 1992–1994.
  4. ^ The 2019 season started in mid-September and ended in late October.[82]

References

  1. ^ a b "Arizona Fall League Announces 2008 Rosters" (PDF) (Press release). Arizona Fall League. August 26, 2008. Retrieved November 21, 2021 – via MLB.com.
  2. ^ a b c "About the AFL". MLB.com. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Arizona Fall League & AZ Instructional League". thecubreporter.com. 2021. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  4. ^ a b Walsh, Jim (October 11, 1998). "Mesa loses Fall League team". The Arizona Republic. p. 6 EV. Retrieved November 21, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "MLB Moves Up Arizona Fall League Schedule for 2019". BallparkDigest.com. March 20, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  6. ^ "Rafters call Surprise Stadium home for Fall League baseball". The Arizona Republic. Phoenix, Arizona. October 18, 2006. p. 41. Retrieved April 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  7. ^ Reaves, Joseph A. (October 8, 2006). "A ball in the fall". The Arizona Republic. p. C2. Retrieved November 14, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Buchanan, Zach (November 3, 2013). "Barrett, Stites manage to earn spots as Stars". The Arizona Republic. Phoenix, Arizona. p. C14. Retrieved November 14, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Mayo, Jonathan (October 10, 2019). "Here are Saturday's Fall Stars Game rosters". MLB.com. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  10. ^ Morales, Javier (September 24, 1992). "Arizona Fall League falling into place". Arizona Daily Star. Tucson, Arizona. p. 4. Retrieved April 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Stone, Larry (September 22, 1992). "Baseball notebook". North County Times. Oceanside, California. p. 20. Retrieved April 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Officials from development league welcome opening day". Times-News. Twin Falls, Idaho. October 6, 1992. p. A-7. Retrieved November 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Baseball". The Sacramento Bee. Sacramento, California. October 7, 1992. p. F6. Retrieved November 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Javelinas will make trek to Phoenix – permanently". Arizona Daily Star. April 11, 1994. p. C2. Retrieved November 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Ottens, Cale (April 14, 2013). "Fall League team moving to W. Valley". The Arizona Republic. p. B2. Retrieved November 21, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Season to open today in the Valley". The Arizona Republic. October 9, 2007. p. C4. Retrieved November 21, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Finley, Ryan (October 3, 2019). "Four-day baseball party returns, with Solar Sox replacing Wildcats". Arizona Daily Star. p. C1. Retrieved November 21, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  18. ^ Caputo, Paul (July 23, 2019). "MLB unveils new logo for Arizona Fall League". sportslogos.net. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  19. ^ Maun, Tyler (September 21, 2020). "2020 Arizona Fall League season canceled". MiLB.com. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  20. ^ Baseball-Reference.com minor-league records for each player. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  21. ^ "Baseball mad: Jordan, Scorpions account for 80 percent of Arizona Fall League's attendance". The Herald-Palladium. St. Joseph, Michigan. Associated Press. November 15, 1994. p. 16. Retrieved April 25, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
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