The Bhawal Rajbari and its garden in the foreground (2007)
The Bhawal Rajbari and its garden in the foreground (2007)

Bhawal Estate was the second largest zamindari in Bengal (in modern-day Bangladesh) until it was abolished according to East Bengal State Acquisition and Tenancy Act of 1950.[1][2]

History

In the late 17th century, Daulat Ghazi was the zamindar of the Ghazi estate of Bhawal. Bala Ram was Diwan of Daulat Ghazi. In 1704, as the consequence of change in the policy of revenue collectionm, Bala Ram's son Sri Krishna was installed as the zamindar of Bhawal by Murshid Quli Khan. Since then, through acquisitions the zamindari expanded. The family turned into the proprietor of the whole Bhawal pargana after purchasing the zamindari of J. Wise, an indigo grower for Rs 4,46,000.[2]

In 1878, British Raj conferred Raja title to Zamindar Kalinarayan Roy Chowdhury.[2] His son Raja Rajendra Narayan Roy Chowdhury extended the zamindari. Rajendra was married to Rani Bilasmani Devi. They had 3 daughters - Indumayi, Jyotirmayi and Tarinmayi, and 3 sons - Ranendra Narayan, Ramendra Narayan and Rabindra Narayan.[2][3] Writer Kaliprosanna Ghosh was appointed the Dewan of Bhawal Estate for Rajendra Narayan.[4] Rajendra died in 1901.[2]

Area

The estate comprised over 1,500 kilometer including 2,274 villages and around 55,000 villagers.[5] Its biggest establishment is the Bhawal Rajbari palace.[5] Bhawal Temple and Shoshan Ghaat (cremating area) are situated to the south of the palace.[5]

References

  1. ^ Khan, Waqar A. (27 September 2021). "Legacy of the Kumar of Bhawal". The Daily Star. Retrieved 5 October 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e Islam, Sirajul; Miah, Sajahan; Khanam, Mahfuza; Ahmed, Sabbir, eds. (2012). "Bhawal Estate". Banglapedia: the National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Online ed.). Dhaka, Bangladesh: Banglapedia Trust, Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. OCLC 52727562. Retrieved 14 May 2022.
  3. ^ Khan, Waqar A. (3 December 2018). "The Legendary Tale of The Bhawal Sannyasi". The Daily Star. Retrieved 5 October 2021.
  4. ^ Bhowmik, Dulal (2012). "Ghosh, Rai Bahadur Kaliprosanna". In Islam, Sirajul; Miah, Sajahan; Khanam, Mahfuza; Ahmed, Sabbir (eds.). Banglapedia: the National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Online ed.). Dhaka, Bangladesh: Banglapedia Trust, Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. OCLC 52727562. Retrieved 14 May 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Apurba Jahangir (13 May 2016). "The Haunted Estate". The Daily Star. Retrieved 24 June 2020.