Civil Servant-Family Pair Up
Traditional Chinese結對認親
Simplified Chinese结对认亲
Literal meaningpair up families

Civil Servant-Family Pair Up (Chinese: 结对认亲), also known as Pair Up and Become Family, is a Chinese government policy that forces designated Uyghur families to be matched with Han Chinese civil servants, with the families forced to host the civil servants in their home.[1][2][3] Since the late 2010s, China has vigorously promoted the policy in Xinjiang.[4] Beginning in 2018,[5] over one million Chinese government workers began forcibly living in the homes of Uyghur families to monitor and assess resistance to cultural assimilation as well as to surveil religious and cultural practices.[6] According to the official state perspective, the policy is to provide Mandarin language training as a way to better integrate Uyghurs and as a means for the poverty alleviation of the region.[7][8] Policies bearing the same name have also been implemented in impoverished regions in Anhui,[9] Tibet, [10] as well as for left-behind children,[11] widowed elders,[12] the disabled,[13] and in earthquake-affected regions.[14]

Hosting requirements have increased over time across counties and prefectures, ranging from 5 days per month to 14 days per month.[15] Despite this, overseas Uyghurs have stated that 'visitation' times often exceeded the time requirement, with one stating that visits regularly occurred up to four times per week and eventually became full-time.[1] Refusal to host leads to imprisonment in an internment camp.[1]

According to Radio Free Asia, these Han Chinese government workers have been trained to call themselves "relatives" and engage in the forcible co-habitation of Uyghur homes for the purpose of promoting "ethnic unity".[6] Radio Free Asia reports that these men "regularly sleep in the same beds as the wives of men detained in the region’s internment camps." Chinese officials maintain that co-sleeping is acceptable, provided that a distance of one meter is maintained between the women and the "relative" assigned to the Uyghur home.[16][17] Uyghur activists state that no such restraint takes place, citing pregnancy and forced marriage numbers, and name the program a campaign of "mass rape disguised as 'marriage'."[16] Human Rights Watch has condemned the Pair Up and Become Family Program as a "deeply invasive forced assimilation practice", while the World Uyghur Congress states that it represents the "total annihilation of the safety, security and well-being of family members."[17]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Kang, Dake; Wang, Yanan (November 30, 2018). "China's Uighurs told to share beds, meals with party members". Associated Press. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  2. ^ Fernando, Gavin (December 21, 2019). "'This is mass rape': China slammed over programme that 'appoints' men to sleep with Uighur women". The New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  3. ^ Goff, Peter (December 17, 2019). "'Become family': China sends officials to stay with Xinjiang minorities: Uighur homestays by cadres extends surveillance to within the home, local Muslims say". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on December 13, 2020. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  4. ^ Shohret Hoshur; Lipes, Joshua (October 31, 2019). "Male Chinese 'Relatives' Assigned to Uyghur Homes Co-sleep With Female 'Hosts'". Radio Free Asia. Archived from the original on January 14, 2020. Retrieved January 16, 2020. The head of a local neighborhood committee in Yengisar county, who also declined to be named, confirmed that male officials regularly sleep in the same beds or sleeping platforms with female members of Uyghur households during their home stays.
  5. ^ Westcott, Ben; Xiong, Yong. "Xinjiang's Uyghurs didn't choose to be Muslim, new Chinese report says". CNN. Archived from the original on 2019-12-19. Retrieved 2019-12-02.
  6. ^ a b Byler, Darren (9 November 2018). "Why Chinese civil servants are happy to occupy Uyghur homes in Xinjiang". CNN. Archived from the original on 17 January 2021.
  7. ^ ""这里就是我的家"-国务院国有资产监督管理委员会". www.sasac.gov.cn. Retrieved 2023-01-13.
  8. ^ "新疆百万干部职工与各族群众结对认亲--公益--人民网". gongyi.people.com.cn. Retrieved 2023-01-13.
  9. ^ ""结对认亲"扎住"根" 安徽日报". Archived from the original on 2020-01-01.
  10. ^ "数说宝"藏"|连心!西藏近16万名干部与贫困群众结对认亲_扶贫_中国西藏网".
  11. ^ "湖北新闻网 枣阳关爱农村留守儿童纪事". Archived from the original on 2019-12-30.
  12. ^ "该文章已不存在_手机新浪网".
  13. ^ "社区干部与残疾居民结对认亲,有病的送去看病,家庭困难的帮忙谋工作_武汉_新闻中心_长江网_cjn.cn".
  14. ^ "宁波爱心家庭与40名四川青川灾区儿童结亲-青川-浙江在线-浙江新闻".
  15. ^ "China: Visiting Officials Occupy Homes in Muslim Region". Human Rights Watch. 13 May 2018. Archived from the original on 20 March 2020. Retrieved 29 April 2020. Since March, every cadre in Wensu County, Aksu Prefecture, has been required to stay in the homes of villagers "for no less than eight days a month." An official article describes how, after a work day at the office, cadres "brought their own bedding" to a minority villager's home, where they "will stay the night."
  16. ^ a b Fernando, Gavin (23 December 2019). "'This is mass rape': China slammed over program that 'appoints' men to sleep with Uighur women". News.com.au. Archived from the original on 14 April 2021.
  17. ^ a b Hoshur, Shohret (31 October 2019). "Male Chinese 'Relatives' Assigned to Uyghur Homes Co-sleep With Female 'Hosts'". Radio Free Asia. Archived from the original on 14 January 2020.