Cumberland County
Downtown Bridgeton
Downtown Bridgeton
Flag of Cumberland County
Official seal of Cumberland County
Map of New Jersey highlighting Cumberland County
Location within the U.S. state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°20′N 75°08′W / 39.33°N 75.13°W / 39.33; -75.13Coordinates: 39°20′N 75°08′W / 39.33°N 75.13°W / 39.33; -75.13
Country United States
State New Jersey
Founded1748
Named forPrince William, Duke of Cumberland
SeatBridgeton[1]
Largest municipalityVineland (population)
Maurice River Township (area)
Government
 • Director of the Board of County CommissionersDarlene Barber (D, term ends December 31, 2022)
Area
 • Total677.62 sq mi (1,755.0 km2)
 • Land483.70 sq mi (1,252.8 km2)
 • Water193.92 sq mi (502.3 km2)  28.62%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total154,152
 • Density318.6/sq mi (123.0/km2)
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.co.cumberland.nj.us
Interactive map of Cumberland County, New Jersey

Cumberland County is a coastal county located on the Delaware Bay in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States Census, the county's population was 154,152, making it the 16th-largest of the state's 21 counties. Its county seat is Bridgeton.[1] Cumberland County is named for Prince William, Duke of Cumberland.[2][3] The county was formally created from portions of Salem County as of January 19, 1748.[4]

This county is part of the Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area[5] as well as the Delaware Valley Combined Statistical Area.[6]

History

African Americans settled in Cumberland County in the first half of the 18th century.[7]

Geography

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 677.62 square miles (1,755.0 km2), including 483.70 square miles (1,252.8 km2) of land (71.4%) and 193.92 square miles (502.3 km2) of water (28.6%).[8]

Cumberland is a low-lying, generally featureless coastal county, with many salt marshes near the Delaware Bay. The highest elevation is at one of 12 areas in Upper Deerfield Township that stand approximately 140 feet (43 m) above sea level;[9] the lowest elevation is sea level.

Adjacent counties

1across Delaware Bay; no land border

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17908,248
18009,52915.5%
181012,67033.0%
182012,6680.0%
183014,09311.2%
184014,3742.0%
185017,18919.6%
186022,60531.5%
187034,66553.4%
188037,6878.7%
189045,43820.6%
190051,19312.7%
191055,1537.7%
192061,34811.2%
193069,89513.9%
194073,1844.7%
195088,59721.1%
1960106,85020.6%
1970121,37413.6%
1980132,8669.5%
1990138,0533.9%
2000146,4386.1%
2010156,8987.1%
2020154,152−1.8%
Historical sources: 1790-1990[10]
1970-2010[11] 2020[12]

2020 Census

As of the 2020 United States census, the county's had 154,152 people, 51,360 households, and 34,309 families.[13] The population density was 318.7 inhabitants per square mile (123.1/km2). There were 57,119 housing units at an average density of 118 per square mile (45.6/km2). The racial makeup was 45.4% White, 18.0% African American, 0.9% Native American, 1.2% Asian, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 34.4% of the population.[14]

Of the 51,360 households, of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.9% were married couples living together, 18.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 9.3% had a male householder with no wife present and 33.2% were non-families, and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.30.

About 23.8% of the population was under age 18, 7.5% was from age 18 to 24, 39.3% was from age 15 to 44, and 15.7% was age 65 or older. The median age was 38.1 years. The gender makeup was 51.7% male and 48.3% female. For every 100 females, there were 107.1 males.[15]

The median household income was $54,587, and the median family income was $65,022. About 13.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.1% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.[16][17]

2010 Census

The 2010 United States census counted 156,898 people, 51,931 households, and 36,559 families in the county. The population density was 324.4 per square mile (125.3/km2). There were 55,834 housing units at an average density of 115.4 per square mile (44.6/km2). The racial makeup was 62.74% (98,430) White, 20.23% (31,741) Black or African American, 1.11% (1,746) Native American, 1.22% (1,907) Asian, 0.04% (59) Pacific Islander, 11.15% (17,492) from other races, and 3.52% (5,523) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 27.06% (42,457) of the population.[18]

Of the 51,931 households, 31.4% had children under the age of 18; 45.2% were married couples living together; 18.6% had a female householder with no husband present and 29.6% were non-families. Of all households, 24% were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.26.[18]

24% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.5 years. For every 100 females, the population had 106.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 106.9 males.[18]

Economy

Based on data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Cumberland County had a gross domestic product (GDP) of $6.1 billion in 2018, which was ranked 17th in the state and represented an increase of 1.6% from the previous year.[19]

Government

County Government

The Cumberland County Courthouse in Bridgeton
The Cumberland County Courthouse in Bridgeton

Cumberland County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners consisting of seven members who are elected at large by the citizens of Cumberland County in partisan elections and serve staggered three-year terms in office, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. Each Commissioner is assigned responsibility for one of the county's departments.[20] In 2016, freeholders were paid $15,000 and the freeholder director was paid an annual salary of $16,000.[21]

As of 2022, members of the Cumberland County Board of County Commissioners (with party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are:[20][22][23][24][25][26]

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey has have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[34] Cape May's Constitutional offers are:[22]

The Cumberland County Prosecutor is Jennifer Webb-McRae of Vineland. First nominated by Governor of New Jersey Jon Corzine in January 2010, Webb-McRae was nominated for a second five-year term by Chris Christie in November 2016 and sworn into office after confirmation in January 2017.[41][42]

Cumberland County is a part of Vicinage 15 of the New Jersey Superior Court (along with Gloucester County and Salem County), seated in Woodbury in Gloucester County; the Assignment Judge for the vicinage is Benjamin C. Telsey. The Cumberland County Courthouse is in Bridgeton.[43]

Federal Representation

The 2nd Congressional District includes all of Cumberland County.[44][45] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township).[46]

State Representation

District Senate[47] Assembly[47] Municipalities
1st Mike Testa (R) Antwan McClellan (R)

Erik K. Simonsen (R)

Commercial Township, Downe Township, Fairfield Township, Greenwich Township, Hopewell Township,

Lawrence Township, Maurice River Township, Millville, Shiloh Borough, Stow Creek Township and Vineland.

The remainder of this district includes portions of Gloucester County & Salem County.

3rd Edward Durr (R) Bethanne McCarthy Patrick (R)

Beth Sawyer (R)

Bridgeton, Deerfield Township and Upper Deerfield Township.

The remainder of this district includes portions of Gloucester County & Salem County.

The New Jersey Department of Corrections operates three correctional facilities in the county. They are Bayside State Prison, South Woods State Prison, and Southern State Correctional Facility. In 2007, while the state was preparing to close Riverfront State Prison in Camden, it considered establishing a fourth state prison in Cumberland County.[48]

Politics

Cumberland County tends to lean towards the Democratic party. As of August 1, 2020, there were a total of 91,725 registered voters in Cumberland County, of whom 32,667 (35.6%) were registered as Democrats, 20,249 (22.1%) were registered as Republicans and 36,923 (40.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 1,886 (2.1%) voters registered to other parties.[49]

In the 2008 U.S. presidential election, Barack Obama carried the county with over 60% of the vote, which he did so again in 2012. However, since then, the county has taken a shift to the right and voted for Hillary Clinton by 6.1% in 2016. Joe Biden won the county by a slightly smaller 6.0% in 2020 despite the fact that Democrats improved their national popular vote total by 3.2%.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[50]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020[51] 46.3% 28,952 52.3% 32,742 1.4% 881
2016 45.0% 24,453 51.1% 27,771 3.9% 2,107
2012 37.3% 20,658 61.5% 34,055 1.2% 656
2008 38.4% 22,360 60.0% 34,919 1.6% 915
2004 45.8% 24,362 52.4% 27,875 1.8% 948
2000 38.8% 18,882 57.9% 28,188 3.3% 1,614
1996 31.7% 14,744 54.7% 25,444 13.6% 6,345
1992 36.9% 19,253 42.6% 22,220 20.4% 10,643
1988 53.8% 26,024 45.2% 21,869 0.9% 456
1984 57.5% 29,398 41.3% 21,141 1.2% 616
1980 50.1% 23,242 41.7% 19,356 8.2% 3,805
1976 40.8% 20,535 58.0% 29,165 1.2% 587
1972 58.2% 26,409 41.2% 18,692 0.6% 291
1968 40.4% 18,388 47.6% 21,661 12.0% 5,439
1964 27.3% 12,611 72.7% 33,593 0.0% 11
1960 47.8% 21,283 52.1% 23,199 0.1% 30
1956 58.1% 24,067 41.8% 17,309 0.2% 68
1952 53.4% 21,819 46.3% 18,929 0.3% 111
1948 51.2% 16,556 47.0% 15,195 1.7% 562
1944 47.9% 14,477 51.9% 15,674 0.2% 67
1940 45.8% 16,322 54.0% 19,251 0.3% 107
1936 41.1% 14,500 58.1% 20,492 0.9% 300
1932 55.6% 16,668 41.3% 12,371 3.1% 932
1928 77.9% 23,921 21.8% 6,694 0.3% 84
1924 71.1% 15,691 21.6% 4,780 7.3% 1,613
1920 68.4% 11,913 25.8% 4,487 5.9% 1,027
1916 52.1% 5,692 41.9% 4,573 6.0% 652
1912 18.2% 1,895 37.0% 3,858 44.8% 4,671
1908 56.6% 6,770 37.8% 4,521 5.7% 679
1904 64.3% 7,402 28.8% 3,317 6.9% 796
1900 58.7% 6,780 34.9% 4,036 6.4% 744
1896[52] 61.1% 7,018 33.8% 3,877 5.2% 593
County CPVI: D+2

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christe received 41.75% of the vote (14,079 votes) to Democratic Governor Jon Corzine's 50.69% (17,092 votes), while Independent Chris Daggett received 5.82% of the vote (1,962 votes), thus making Cumberland and nearby Camden counties the only southern New Jersey county to back the governor's re-election that year. In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Governor Chris Christe received 56.7% of the vote (17,943 votes) to Democrat Barbara Buono's 41.4% (13,129 votes).

Municipalities

Index map of Cumberland County Municipalities (click to see index key)
Index map of Cumberland County Municipalities (click to see index key)
1862 map
1862 map
Interactive map of municipalities in Cumberland County.

The 14 municipalities in Cumberland County (with most 2010 Census data for population, housing units and area) are:[53]

Municipality
(with map key)
Map key Municipal
type
Population Housing
Units
Total
Area
Water
Area
Land
Area
Pop.
Density
Housing
Density
Communities
Bridgeton 3 city 25,349 6,782 6.43 0.25 6.18 4,102.5 1,097.6
Commercial Township 13 township 5,178 2,115 34.44 2.31 32.13 161.2 65.8 Buckshutem
Laurel Lake (2,929)
Mauricetown
Port Norris (1,377)
Deerfield Township 9 township 3,119 1,143 16.80 0.03 16.76 186.1 68.2 Rosenhayn (1,098)
Downe Township 12 township 1,585 996 54.27 5.66 48.61 32.6 20.5 Dividing Creek
Fortescue
Newport
Fairfield Township 10 township 6,295 2,058 43.95 2.69 41.26 152.6 49.9 Fairton (1,264)
Sea Breeze
Greenwich Township 6 township 804 369 18.83 1.00 17.84 45.1 20.7 Othello
Springtown
Hopewell Township 7 township 4,571 1,741 30.83 0.95 29.87 153.0 58.3 Bowentown
Cohansey
Lawrence Township 11 township 3,290 1,221 38.33 1.41 36.92 89.1 33.1 Cedarville (776)
Maurice River Township 14 township 7,976 1,506 95.76 2.65 93.11 85.7 16.2 Cumberland
Delmont
Dorchester
Heislerville
Hesstown
Leesburg
Port Elizabeth
Millville 2 city 28,400 11,435 44.49 2.49 42.00 676.2 272.3
Shiloh 4 borough 516 214 1.21 0.00 1.21 427.3 177.2
Stow Creek Township 5 township 1,431 568 18.85 0.55 18.30 78.2 31.0 Jericho
Roadstown
Upper Deerfield Township 8 township 7,660 3,025 31.27 0.18 31.10 246.3 97.3 Deerfield
Seabrook
Seabrook Farms (1,484)
Vineland 1 city 60,724 22,661 69.03 0.61 68.42 887.5 331.2
Cumberland County county 156,898 55,834 677.62 193.92 483.70 324.4 115.4

Transportation

Airports

The following public-use airports are located in Cumberland County:

Roads and highways

As of 2010, the county had a total of 1,271.74 miles (2,046.67 km) of roadways, of which 643.65 miles (1,035.85 km) were maintained by the local municipality, 539.14 miles (867.66 km) by Cumberland County and 88.95 miles (143.15 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[54]

Cumberland is served only by state and county routes. Major county routes that pass through include County Route 540, County Route 548 (only in Maurice River Township), County Route 550, County Route 552, County Route 553 and County Route 555.

State routes include Route 47, Route 49, Route 55, Route 56, Route 77 and Route 347.

Route 55 is the only limited access road in the county which provides access to I-76, Interstate 295, and the Philadelphia area to the north.

Climate and weather

Bridgeton, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
3.6
 
 
41
25
 
 
2.9
 
 
44
28
 
 
4.3
 
 
52
34
 
 
4
 
 
63
43
 
 
3.8
 
 
73
53
 
 
4.2
 
 
82
63
 
 
4.1
 
 
87
68
 
 
4.1
 
 
85
66
 
 
4.3
 
 
78
59
 
 
3.6
 
 
67
47
 
 
3.3
 
 
56
39
 
 
4
 
 
45
30
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[55]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Bridgeton have ranged from a low of 25 °F (−4 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −13 °F (−25 °C) was recorded in January 1985 and a record high of 101 °F (38 °C) was recorded in July 1966. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.94 inches (75 mm) in February to 4.30 inches (109 mm) in March.[55] Cumberland has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa).

Parks and recreation

The sole YMCA in the county is the Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA in Vineland.[56]

Wineries

See also

References

  1. ^ a b New Jersey County Map, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed July 10, 2017.
  2. ^ Baehr, Judy. "Cumberland – A County Born of Hope, Optimism" Archived 2007-12-16 at the Wayback Machine, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed December 13, 2007. "The county was named for William Augustus, the second son of King George II. As the Duke of Cumberland in 1746, he had defeated the Stuart Pretender, Charles Edward (Bonnie Prince Charlie), at the battle of Culloden and established the House of Hanover on the British throne."
  3. ^ The Origin of New Jersey Place Names: C, GetNJ.com. Accessed December 13, 2007.
  4. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 78. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  5. ^ May 2012 Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Definitions, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Accessed May 29, 2013.
  6. ^ Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas, Office of Management and Budget, February 28, 2013. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  7. ^ Bennett, Eileen of The Press of Atlantic City. "Cumberland pot 250 years in the melting - County celebrates the diversity of its people", Cumberland County. Accessed March 6, 2022. "Next were the New Bethel A.M.E. Praise Dancers, representing the African-American community that settled in the county between 1700 and 1750."
  8. ^ Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Counties, United States Census Bureau, Backed up by the Internet Archive as of June 11, 2012. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  9. ^ New Jersey County High Points, Peakbagger.com. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L. Population of states and counties of the United States: 1790 to 1990 from the Twenty-one Decennial Censuses, pp. 108-109. United States Census Bureau, March 1996. ISBN 9780934213486. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  11. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, p. 6, CPH-2-32. United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed August 29, 2016.
  12. ^ QuickFacts Cumberland County, New Jersey; New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2022.
  13. ^ "HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES (S1101) | Cumberland County (ACS 1-Year)". United States Census Bureau (USCB). 2019. Archived from the original on January 21, 2022. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  14. ^ "DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES (DP05) | Cumberland County (ACS 1-Year)". United States Census Bureau (USCB). 2019. Archived from the original on January 21, 2022. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  15. ^ "AGE AND SEX (S0101) | Cumberland County (ACS 1-Year)". United States Census Bureau (USCB). 2019. Archived from the original on January 21, 2022. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  16. ^ "INCOME IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS (S1901) | Cumberland County (ACS 1-Year)". United States Census Bureau (USCB). 2019. Archived from the original on January 21, 2022. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  17. ^ "POVERTY STATUS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS (S1701) | Cumberland County (ACS 1-Year)". United States Census Bureau (USCB). 2019. Archived from the original on January 21, 2022. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  18. ^ a b c DP1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 26, 2016.
  19. ^ Local Area Gross Domestic Product, 2018, Bureau of Economic Analysis, released December 12, 2019. Accessed December 12, 2019.
  20. ^ a b Board of County Commissioners, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022. "By law, Cumberland County is allowed 7 County Commissioners, who serve staggered, overlapping three-year terms. Two are elected in two successive years, three in the third year, elected from the county at-large, for three year, overlapping terms. A Director of the Board is selected by their colleagues for a one-year term. Each County Commissioner is charged with responsibility for one or more of the county's seven departments."
  21. ^ Gallo Jr., Bill. "Which N.J. county freeholders are paid the most?", NJ.com, March 11, 2016. Accessed October 25, 2017. "Freeholder director: $16,000; Other freeholders: $15,000"
  22. ^ a b 2021 Directory of Cumberland County, New Jersey, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  23. ^ 2021 County Data Sheet, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  24. ^ Election Summary Report General Election November 2, 2021, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 19, 2021. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  25. ^ General Election November 3, 2020 Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 19, 2020. Accessed January 1, 2021.
  26. ^ November 5, 2019 General Election Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 14, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  27. ^ Darlene Barber, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  28. ^ Donna M. Pearson, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  29. ^ Douglas Albrecht, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  30. ^ George Castellini, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  31. ^ Carol Musso, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  32. ^ Antonio Romero, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2022.
  33. ^ Joseph V. Sileo, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  34. ^ New Jersey State Constitution (1947), Article VII, Section II, Paragraph 2, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  35. ^ County Clerk: Celeste M. Riley, Cumberland County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  36. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  37. ^ Sheriff's Office, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  38. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  39. ^ Cumberland County Surrogate Office, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  40. ^ Members List: Surrogates}, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  41. ^ Jennifer Webb-McRae, Cumberland County Prosecutor's Office. Accessed October 25, 2017. "In January of 2010, Jennifer was nominated by Governor Jon S. Corzine to be the first African American, first female Prosecutor of Cumberland County.... In November of 2016, Governor Chris Christie nominated Prosecutor Webb-McRae for a second five year term as Cumberland County Prosecutor. In January of 2017, Prosecutor Webb-McRae was sworn in becoming the first full-time Prosecutor in Cumberland County to serve a second term."
  42. ^ "Governor Chris Christie Files Nominations And Direct Appointments", Governor of New Jersey Chris Christie, press release dated November 21, 2016. Accessed October 25, 2017. "Cumberland County Prosecutor - Nominate for reappointment Jennifer Webb-McRae (Vineland, Cumberland)"
  43. ^ Cumberland/Gloucester/Salem Counties, New Jersey Courts. Accessed October 23, 2017.
  44. ^ 2012 Congressional Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  45. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  47. ^ a b "New Jersey Legislative Roster of Members | NJ Legislature". New Jersey Legislature. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  48. ^ Jackson, Miles. "Is A New Prison Needed?: Facilities offer steady employment in Cumberland Co.", Daily Journal. June 23, 2007. A1 News. Accessed September 27, 2011. "The county already is home to South Woods State Prison in Bridgeton, Southern State Correctional Facility in Delmont and Bayside State Prison in Leesburg."
  49. ^ "NJ Voter Registration by County" (PDF). NJ DOS - Division of Elections.
  50. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  51. ^ Cumberland, New Jersey Election Results, County Votes. Accessed January 3, 2021.
  52. ^ N. W. Ayer & Son's American Newspaper Annual: containing a Catalogue of American Newspapers, a List of All Newspapers of the United States and Canada, 1900, Volume 3, p. 1167, via University of North Texas. Accessed January 3, 2021. "Cumberland Co. (S)..... Pop. 49,815; Rep. vote in 1896, 7,018; Dem. 3,877; Pro. 487;G.D. 78."
  53. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 23, 2017.
  54. ^ Cumberland County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  55. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Bridgeton, New Jersey". The Weather Channel. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  56. ^ "Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA installs new board officers". The Daily Journal. February 28, 2018. Retrieved April 24, 2021. Kathy Farinaccio, second vice president/secretary, commented, “The YMCA’s value is priceless for providing families in Cumberland, Cape May, and Atlantic Counties a healthy, active, and vibrant environment.”