Ocean County
Sunrise at Barnegat Lighthouse on Long Beach Island, May 2006
Sunrise at Barnegat Lighthouse on Long Beach Island, May 2006
Flag of Ocean County
Map of New Jersey highlighting Ocean County
Location within the U.S. state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°52′N 74°15′W / 39.87°N 74.25°W / 39.87; -74.25Coordinates: 39°52′N 74°15′W / 39.87°N 74.25°W / 39.87; -74.25
Country United States
State New Jersey
Founded1850[1]
Named forAtlantic Ocean
SeatToms River[2]
Largest cityLakewood Township (population)
Jackson Township (area)
Government
 • Commissioner directorJohn P. Kelly (R, term ends December 31, 2022)
Area
 • Total915.40 sq mi (2,370.9 km2)
 • Land628.78 sq mi (1,628.5 km2)
 • Water286.62 sq mi (742.3 km2)  31.31%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total637,229
 • Estimate 
(2021)[3]
648,998
 • Density700/sq mi (270/km2)
Congressional districts2nd, 4th
Websitewww.co.ocean.nj.us
Interactive map of Ocean County, New Jersey

Ocean County is a county located along the Jersey Shore in the south-central portion of the U.S. state of New Jersey. It borders the Atlantic Ocean on the east. Its county seat is Toms River.[2] Since 1990, Ocean County has been one of New Jersey's fastest-growing counties. As of the 2020 U.S. census, the county's population was enumerated at 637,229, a 10.5% increase from the 576,567 counted in the 2010 U.S. census,[3] which in turn represented an increase of 65,651 (+12.8%) from the 2000 census population of 510,916.[3] In 2020, Ocean County was ranked as the state's sixth-most populous county.[4] The county was the fastest-growing county in New Jersey between 2000 and 2010 in terms of increase in the number of residents and second-highest in the percentage of growth. Ocean County was established on February 15, 1850, from portions of Monmouth County, with the addition of Little Egg Harbor Township which was annexed from Burlington County on March 30, 1891.[1] The most populous municipality is Lakewood Township, with 135,158 residents in 2020, up from 92,843 at the 2010 Census[5] while Jackson Township covers 100.62 square miles (260.6 km2), the largest total area of any municipality in the county.[6]

Ocean County is located 50 miles (80 km) east of Philadelphia, 70 miles (110 km) south of New York City, and 25 miles (40 km) north of Atlantic City, making it a prime vacation destination for residents of these cities during the summer. As with the entire Jersey Shore, summer traffic routinely clogs local roadways throughout the season. Ocean County is comprised of 31.3% water.

Ocean County is part of the New York metropolitan area[7] but is also home to many tourist attractions frequented by Philadelphia metropolitan area residents, including the beachfront communities of Seaside Heights, Long Beach Island, and Point Pleasant Beach, and Six Flags Great Adventure, an amusement park that is the home to the world's tallest and second-fastest roller coaster, Kingda Ka. Ocean County is a gateway to New Jersey's Pine Barrens, one of the largest protected pieces of land on the East Coast. Ocean County is part of the New York City and Philadelphia media market. The county is located in the South Jersey region of the state.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county had as of the 2010 Census a total area of 915.40 square miles (2,370.9 km2), making it the largest county in New Jersey in terms of total area (ahead of Burlington County's), total 819.84 sq mi of which 628.78 square miles (1,628.5 km2) of land (68.7%) and 286.62 square miles (742.3 km2) of water (31.31%).[6][8]

Much of the county is flat and coastal, with many beaches. The highest point is one of three unnamed hills (one in Jackson Township, the other two in Plumsted Township) that reach at least 230 feet (70 m) in elevation.[9] The lowest elevation in the county is sea level.

It is also home to many beaches on the Jersey Shore, including Beach Haven, Seaside Heights, Ship Bottom, Surf City, Harvey Cedars, and Barnegat Light.

Climate

Toms River, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
3.9
 
 
41
24
 
 
3.3
 
 
44
25
 
 
4.8
 
 
51
32
 
 
4.1
 
 
61
41
 
 
3.7
 
 
71
51
 
 
3.8
 
 
80
61
 
 
4.6
 
 
85
66
 
 
4.7
 
 
83
64
 
 
3.8
 
 
77
58
 
 
3.9
 
 
67
46
 
 
4.1
 
 
57
38
 
 
4.5
 
 
46
29
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[10]
Metric conversion
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
100
 
 
5
−4
 
 
84
 
 
7
−4
 
 
122
 
 
11
0
 
 
103
 
 
16
5
 
 
95
 
 
22
11
 
 
97
 
 
27
16
 
 
117
 
 
29
19
 
 
119
 
 
28
18
 
 
96
 
 
25
14
 
 
99
 
 
19
8
 
 
104
 
 
14
3
 
 
115
 
 
8
−2
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Climate data for Jackson, NJ
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41
(5)
44
(7)
51
(11)
61
(16)
71
(22)
80
(27)
85
(29)
83
(28)
77
(25)
67
(19)
57
(14)
46
(8)
64
(18)
Average low °F (°C) 22
(−6)
24
(−4)
30
(−1)
39
(4)
49
(9)
59
(15)
64
(18)
62
(17)
55
(13)
43
(6)
35
(2)
27
(−3)
42
(6)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.92
(100)
3.30
(84)
4.79
(122)
4.07
(103)
3.73
(95)
3.80
(97)
4.60
(117)
4.69
(119)
3.79
(96)
3.90
(99)
4.11
(104)
4.51
(115)
49.21
(1,251)
Source: [11]

Ocean County's area consists of 31.3% water. The coastal county along the Atlantic Ocean has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa and including the coast). In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Toms River have ranged from a low of 24 °F (−4 °C) in January to a high of 85 °F (29 °C) in July, although a record low of −19 °F (−28 °C) was recorded in January 1982 and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in July 1999. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 3.30 inches (84 mm) in February to 4.79 inches (122 mm) in March.[10] Areas closer to the coast typically experience more mild winters and cooler summers due to the Atlantic Ocean's influence. Average monthly temperatures in Tuckerton near the south end range from 33.2 °F in January to 75.7 °F in July. [4]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
185010,032
186011,17611.4%
187013,62821.9%
188014,4556.1%
189015,97410.5%
190019,74723.6%
191021,3188.0%
192022,1553.9%
193033,06949.3%
194037,70614.0%
195056,62250.2%
1960108,24191.2%
1970208,47092.6%
1980346,03866.0%
1990433,20325.2%
2000510,91617.9%
2010576,56712.8%
2020637,22910.5%
2021 (est.)648,998[3]1.8%
Historical sources: 1790–1990[12]
1970–2010[6] 2010[13] 2000–2010[14] 2020[3]

2020 census

This section needs expansion with: examples with reliable citations. You can help by adding to it. (September 2021)

2010 census

The 2010 United States census counted 576,567 people, 221,111 households, and 149,250 families in the county. The population density was 917 per square mile (354/km2). There were 278,052 housing units at an average density of 442.2 per square mile (170.7/km2). The racial makeup was 90.98% (524,577) White, 3.15% (18,164) Black or African American, 0.17% (966) Native American, 1.75% (10,081) Asian, 0.02% (129) Pacific Islander, 2.46% (14,165) from other races, and 1.47% (8,485) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.29% (47,783) of the population.[13]

Of the 221,111 households, 26.7% had children under the age of 18; 53.9% were married couples living together; 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present and 32.5% were non-families. Of all households, 27.8% were made up of individuals and 16.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.16.[13]

23.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 22.2% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 21% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.6 years. For every 100 females, the population had 92 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 88.3 males.[13]

2000 census

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 510,916 people, 200,402 households, and 137,876 families residing in the county. The population density was 803 people per square mile (310/km2). There were 248,711 housing units at an average density of 151/km2 (391/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 93.05% White, 2.99% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.28% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.24% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 5.02% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[16][17] Among those who listed their ancestry, 25.3% were of Italian, 23.6% Irish, 18.7% German, 8.8% Polish and 8.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000.[17][18] There were 200,402 households, out of which 28.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.40% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.06.[16]

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.30% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 21.90% from 45 to 64, and 22.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.40 males.[16] The median income for a household in the county was $46,443, and the median income for a family was $56,420. Males had a median income of $44,822 versus $30,717 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,054. About 4.8% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.[17][19]

As of the 2000 Census, Mantoloking was the wealthiest community in the state of New Jersey with a per capita money income of $114,017 as of 1999.[20]

Economy

Ocean County is home to the Ocean County Mall in Toms River, featuring a gross leasable area of 898,000 square feet (83,400 m2).[21] The now-closed Sears site will be replaced with 100,000 square feet (9,300 m2) of retail space.[22]

Government

County government

Ocean County Courthouse in Toms River, built in 1850
Ocean County Courthouse in Toms River, built in 1850

Ocean County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of five members who are elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members.[23] In 2016, freeholders were paid $30,000 and the freeholder director was paid an annual salary of $31,000.[24]

As of 2022, Ocean County's Commissioners (with party affiliation, term-end year and residence) are Commissioner Director John P. Kelly (R, 2022, Eagleswood Township),[25] Commissioner Deputy Director Virginia E. Haines (R, 2022, Toms River),[26] Barbara Jo Crea (R, 2024, Little Egg Harbor Township)[27] Gary Quinn (R, 2024, Lacey Township)[28] and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2023, Toms River).[29][30][31]

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[32] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are:[33] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2025, Barnegat Light),[34][35] Sheriff Michael G. Mastronardy (R, 2022; Toms River)[36][37] and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2023, Beachwood).[38][39][40]

The Ocean County Prosecutor is Bradley D. Billhimer who was nominated by Governor of New Jersey Phil Murphy. Prosecutor Billhimer was sworn in by New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal on October 12, 2018.[41][42] Ocean County constitutes Vicinage 14 of the New Jersey Superior Court and is seated at the Ocean County Courthouse Complex in Toms River; the Assignment Judge for Vicinage 14 is Marlene Lynch Ford.[43][44]

Ocean County operates the Ocean County Southern Service Center in Manahawkin.[45] This center offers access to all of the Ocean County government services without the need for residents to travel to the county seat some 20 miles to the north.

Federal representatives

The 2nd and 4th Congressional Districts cover the county.[46] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township).[47] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Chris Smith (R, Manchester Township).[48][49]

State representatives

District Senate[50] Assembly[50] Municipalities
9th Christopher J. Connors (R) Brian E. Rumpf (R)

DiAnne Gove (R)

Barnegat Township, Barnegat Light Borough, Beach Haven Borough, Beachwood Borough, Berkeley Township,

Eagleswood Township, Harvey Cedars Borough, Lacey Township, Little Egg Harbor Township, Long Beach Township,

Ocean Township, Ocean Gate Borough, Pine Beach Borough, Seaside Park Borough, Ship Bottom Borough, South Toms River Borough,

Stafford Township, Surf City Borough and Tuckerton Borough.

The remainder of this district covers portions of Atlantic County and Burlington County.

10th James W. Holzapfel (R) Gregory P. McGuckin (R)

John Catalano (R)

Bay Head Borough, Brick Township, Island Heights Borough, Lakehurst Borough, Lavallette Borough,

Manchester Township, Mantoloking Borough, Point Pleasant Beach Borough, Seaside Heights Borough and Toms River Township.

12th Samuel D. Thompson (R) Ronald S. Dancer (R)

Robert D. Clifton (R)

Jackson Township and Plumsted Township. The remainder of this district includes portions of Burlington County, Middlesex County &

Monmouth County.

30th Robert Singer (R) Sean T. Kean (R)

Ned Thomson (R)

Lakewood Township and Point Pleasant. The remainder of this district includes portions of Monmouth County.

Politics

Ocean County is the most Republican county in New Jersey, a state that characteristically votes Democratic. In its history, it has failed to support a Republican for president only three times. All of its state legislators, County Commissioners, and countywide constitutional officers are Republicans. The last Democratic presidential candidate to win Ocean County was Bill Clinton in 1996, who carried the county with a 46% plurality of the vote. The last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964. As of October 1, 2021, there were a total of 458,230 registered voters in Ocean County, of whom 171,085 (37.3%) were registered as Republicans, 102,005 (22.3%) were registered as Democrats and 179,085 (39.1%) were registered as unaffiliated. There were 6,055 voters (1.3%) registered to other parties.[51] Among the county's 2010 Census population, 63.2% were registered to vote, including 82.6% of those ages 18 and over.[52][53]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 58.4% of the vote here (160,677 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.1% (110,189 votes) among the 276,544 ballots cast by the county's 380,712 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.6%.[54] The Republican vote totals and overall turnout were significantly down in 2012 due to damage and displacement caused by Hurricane Sandy just days before the election. In 2016 and 2020, it was New Jersey's most Republican county, and in 2020, it was the only one to give Donald Trump more than 60% of the vote.

United States presidential election results for Ocean County, New Jersey[55]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 217,740 63.53% 119,456 34.85% 5,550 1.62%
2016 179,079 64.71% 87,150 31.49% 10,496 3.79%
2012 146,475 58.16% 102,300 40.62% 3,079 1.22%
2008 160,677 58.43% 110,189 40.07% 4,111 1.50%
2004 154,204 60.13% 99,839 38.93% 2,424 0.95%
2000 105,684 48.84% 102,104 47.18% 8,605 3.98%
1996 82,830 40.81% 94,243 46.43% 25,903 12.76%
1992 95,984 44.39% 75,431 34.88% 44,828 20.73%
1988 124,587 65.38% 64,474 33.83% 1,497 0.79%
1984 124,391 70.23% 51,012 28.80% 1,710 0.97%
1980 98,433 62.47% 46,923 29.78% 12,212 7.75%
1976 77,875 56.93% 56,413 41.24% 2,493 1.82%
1972 77,979 72.43% 27,710 25.74% 1,978 1.84%
1968 41,995 53.87% 26,909 34.52% 9,059 11.62%
1964 25,985 40.78% 36,892 57.90% 837 1.31%
1960 31,430 60.56% 20,113 38.75% 355 0.68%
1956 28,033 74.80% 9,367 24.99% 79 0.21%
1952 23,490 72.80% 8,660 26.84% 117 0.36%
1948 16,740 70.43% 6,366 26.79% 661 2.78%
1944 13,317 63.32% 7,683 36.53% 32 0.15%
1940 13,394 60.38% 8,762 39.50% 26 0.12%
1936 11,293 52.84% 9,889 46.27% 190 0.89%
1932 10,513 56.95% 7,508 40.67% 439 2.38%
1928 12,301 73.19% 4,452 26.49% 54 0.32%
1924 8,677 70.99% 2,594 21.22% 951 7.78%
1920 6,840 74.84% 2,138 23.39% 161 1.76%
1916 3,386 61.26% 2,076 37.56% 65 1.18%
1912 919 18.60% 1,858 37.61% 2,163 43.79%
1908 3,326 65.15% 1,634 32.01% 145 2.84%
1904 3,666 65.94% 1,709 30.74% 185 3.33%
1900 3,182 65.81% 1,413 29.22% 240 4.96%
1896 3,384 72.59% 1,068 22.91% 210 4.50%

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.6% of the vote here (124,238 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 28.4% (53,761 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 4.8% (9,068 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (1,955 votes), among the 193,186 ballots cast by the county's 371,066 registered voters, yielding a 52.1% turnout.[56] In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 75.7% of the vote here (125,781 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 22.8% (37,930 votes), In the 2017 gubernatorial election, Republican Kim Guadagno received 98,135 (62.1%) of the vote, and Democrat Phil Murphy received 56,682 (35.8%) of the vote. In the 2021 gubernatorial election, Republican Jack Ciattarelli received 67.5% of the vote (145,756 ballots cast) to Democrat Phil Murphy's 31.8% (68,615 votes). Ocean County has been the most Republican in the last three gubernatorial elections.

Gubernatorial elections results
Gubernatorial elections results[57]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2021 67.6% 143,148 31.7% 67,176 0.3% 649
2017 62.1% 98,135 35.8% 56,582 2.2% 3,446
2013 75.7% 125,781 22.8% 37,930 0.1% 2,536
2009 65.6% 124,238 28.4% 53,761 6.0% 11,317
2005 54.2% 93,693 41.6% 71,953 4.2% 7,242
2001 47.1% 77,726 51.3% 84,538 1.6% 2,690
1997 53.8% 84,897 36.7% 57,944 9.6% 15,076
1993 51.4% 87,943 45.7% 78,132 2.9% 4,879
1989 42.1% 62,700 56.1% 83,587 1.8% 2,669
1985 73.7% 90,670 25.2% 30,948 1.2% 1,455
1981 59.5% 78,757 39.3% 52,036 1.2% 1,610

Education

Tertiary education

Ocean County College is the two-year community college for Ocean County, one of a network of 19 county colleges statewide. The school is in Toms River and was founded in 1964.[58]

Georgian Court University in Lakewood Township is a private Roman Catholic Sisters of Mercy college, which opened in 1908 on the former winter estate of millionaire George Jay Gould I, son of railroad tycoon Jay Gould. Lakewood is also home to Beth Medrash Govoha, a Haredi yeshiva with 5,000 students, making it one of the largest yeshivas in the world[59] and the largest outside the State of Israel.[60][61]

Stockton University has a campus located in Manahawkin offering undergraduate and graduate colleges of the arts, sciences and professional studies of the New Jersey state system of higher education.[62]

Primary and secondary schools

Beth Medrash Govoha (Hebrew:בית מדרש גבוה) in Lakewood is the world's largest yeshiva outside of Israel.[60][61]
Beth Medrash Govoha (Hebrew:בית מדרש גבוה) in Lakewood is the world's largest yeshiva outside of Israel.[60][61]

School districts in the county include:[63][64][65]

K-12
Secondary
Elementary (K-6, except as noted)

New Jersey's largest suburban school district, Toms River Regional Schools, is located in Ocean County.[66] Toms River is also home to the county's only Roman Catholic high school, Monsignor Donovan High School, operated by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton, which also has six elementary schools located in the county.[67]

In addition to multiple public high schools, the county has an extensive vocational high school program, known as the Ocean County Vocational Technical School district. In addition to its campuses in Brick, Toms River, Waretown, and Jackson, it contains two magnet schools:[68]

Attractions

Ocean County has an extensive shoreline stretch along the Atlantic Ocean, including the Jersey Shore communities and oceanfront boardwalk resorts of Seaside Heights and Point Pleasant Beach.

Six Flags Great Adventure, America's largest Six Flags theme park, is home to the world's tallest and formerly fastest roller coaster, Kingda Ka. The park also contains Six Flags Hurricane Harbor, New Jersey's largest water park, and the 2,200-acre (890 ha) Six Flags Wild Safari, the largest drive-thru animal safari outside of Africa.[69]

Forty miles of barrier beaches form the Barnegat and Little Egg Harbor Bays, offering ample watersports. It also is home of the Tuckerton Seaport, a 40-acre (160,000 m2) maritime history village in Tuckerton. In addition to being the northeast gateway to New Jersey's Pine Barrens, Ocean County is also home to several state parks:

FirstEnergy Park located in Lakewood, opened in 2001 with 6,588 reserved seats and is home of the Jersey Shore BlueClaws, the High-A affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies.[75]

National protected area

Media

The Asbury Park Press and The Press of Atlantic City are daily newspapers that cover the county.[77] Micromedia Publications publishes six weekly local newspapers in the county; their seventh covers Howell Township, New Jersey in Monmouth County, New Jersey.[78]

92.7 WOBM provides news, traffic and weather updates.

91.9 WBNJ provides local news, PSAs and events; as well as weather updates.

Transportation

Roads and highways

Garden State Parkway South entering Ocean County
Garden State Parkway South entering Ocean County

Ocean County has various major roads that pass through. State routes that go through include Route 13, Route 35, Route 37, Route 70, Route 72, Route 88, and Route 166. Other major routes that pass through are U.S. Route 9, the Garden State Parkway, and I-195, the only Interstate to pass through Ocean County (in Jackson Township).

Several prominent 500 series county highways make up an important portion of the automobile corridors in Ocean County. These include County Road 526, County Road 527, County Road 528, County Road 530, NJ County Road 532, County Road 539, County Road 547, County Road 549, and County Road 571.

The county had a total of 2,958.5 miles (4,761.2 km) of roadways, of which 2,164.2 miles (3,482.9 km) are maintained by the municipality, 615.5 miles (990.6 km) by Ocean County and 140.19 miles (225.61 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 38.59 miles (62.10 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[79]

Public transportation

Train

NJ Transit's (NJT) North Jersey Coast Line, which serves New York Penn Station and passes through Middlesex and Monmouth counties, offers service at the Bay Head and Point Pleasant Beach stations, located at the northernmost corner of the county.[80] The Monmouth Ocean Middlesex Line is a passenger rail project proposed by NJT to serve he northern central part of the county. Southern Ocean County is also located about 25 miles from the Atlantic City Line, which provides service to Philadelphia.

Bus

NJ Transit

Bus service is provided on NJ Transit bus routes 130, 132, 136, and 139 to and from Lakewood Bus Terminal on the U.S. Route 9 corridor. Expanded use Route 9 BBS (bus bypass shoulder lanes) is under study. Bus route 559 provides service along Route 9 between Lakewood and Pleasantville before continuing to Atlantic City.

Bus route 137 provides service in three variants. One is a nonstop express between Toms River and New York City that operates seven days a week. The other two are rush hour only services, one operating along County Route 549 between Toms River and Brick Township before continuing onto New York City. The Other begins and ends in Lakewood, operating via County Line Road to the Brick park and ride before continuing to New York.

Bus route 67 operates between Toms River and Newark, providing service along County Route 549 between Toms River and Brick before continuing onto Lakewood and points north. Bus Route 317 crosses the county in an east–west fashion on its route between Philadelphia and Asbury Park. This route also provides service to Fort Dix, Camden, and other destinations. Bus route 319 makes a single stop in Toms River on its route between Atlantic City and New York.

Ocean Ride

Ocean Ride is a county wide system with 12 regular routes, many serving Ocean County Mall, which acts as transfer hub.[81][82] Of these routes, only the OC 10 (Lavallette to Toms River) operates Monday-Saturday, with the OC 4 (Point Pleasant to Lakewood) operating Monday-Friday. All other routes run 2–3 days a week. Ocean Ride also provides paratransit service throughout the county.

Other services

Academy Bus provides service between various areas in the northern part of the county and New York City. Many of the retirement communities contract for the operation of shuttle buses to connect the communities with various shopping centers in the county.

Municipalities

The 33 municipalities in Ocean County with 2010 census data for population, housing units, and area in square miles are:[83] Other, unincorporated communities in the county are listed alongside their parent municipality (or municipalities).[84] Most of these areas are census-designated places that have been created by the United States Census Bureau for enumeration purposes within a Township.[6] The numbers in parentheses stand for the numbers on the map.

Index map of Ocean County municipalities (see index key in table below)
Index map of Ocean County municipalities (see index key in table below)
Interactive map of municipalities in Ocean County.
Municipality (map index) Map key Mun.
type
Pop. Housing
units
Total
area
Water
area
Land
area
Pop.
density
Housing
density
School
district
Unincorporated
communities/notes
Barnegat Light 6 borough 574 1,282 0.85 0.12 0.73 785.1 1,753.6 Southern Regional (7–12)
Long Beach Island (PK-6)
Barnegat 29 township 20,936 9,085 40.78 6.41 34.38 609.0 264.35 Barnegat Township Barnegat CDP (2,817), Howardsville,
Ocean Acres (part; 925 of 16,142),
Warren Grove
Bay Head 16 borough 968 1,023 0.70 0.12 0.58 1,662.8 1,757.3 Point Pleasant Beach (9–12) (S/R)
Bay Head (K-8)
Beach Haven 2 borough 1,170 2,667 2.32 1.34 0.98 1,196.0 2,726.2 Southern Regional (7–12)
Beach Haven (PK-6)
Beachwood 12 borough 11,045 3,826 2.85 0.00 2.85 3,878.4 1,343.5 Toms River
Berkeley Township 26 township 41,255 23,818 56.00 13.13 42.86 962.5 555.7 Central Regional (7–12)
Berkeley Township (PK-6)
Bayville (20,512), Cedar Beach,
Crossley, Glen Cove, Holiday
City-Berkeley
(13,884), Holiday
City South
(3,689), Holiday
Heights
(2,099), Holly Park,
Pelican Island, Silver Ridge (1,133)
Brick 23 township 75,072 33,677 32.32 6.60 25.72 2,919.4 1,309.6 Brick Adamston, Breton Woods, Burrsville, Cedarcroft, Herbertsville, Laurelton, Osbornsville, Parkway Pines
Eagleswood 31 township 1,603 760 18.86 2.80 16.06 99.8 47.3 Pinelands Regional (7–12)
Eagleswood (PK-6)
West Creek
Harvey Cedars 5 borough 337 1,214 1.19 0.63 0.56 604.6 2,178.0 Southern Regional (7–12)
Long Beach Island (PK-6)
Island Heights 10 borough 1,673 831 0.91 0.30 0.61 2,738.3 1,360.2 Central Regional (7–12)
Islands Heights (K-6)
Jackson 21 township 54,856 20,342 100.62 1.38 99.24 552.7 205.0 Jackson Bennetts Mills, Cassville, Harmony,
Holmeson (part; 5,231), Jackson Mills,
Prospertown, Vista Center (3,689),
Whitesville
Lacey Township 27 township 27,644 11,573 98.53 15.27 83.26 332.0 139.0 Lacey Township Aserdaten, Barnegat Pines, Forked
River
(5,244), Lanoka Harbor
Lakehurst 19 borough 2,654 943 1.01 0.09 0.91 2,900.8 1,030.7 Manchester (9–12) (S/R)
Lakehurst (PK-8)
Lakewood 22 township 92,843 26,337 24.98 0.41 24.58 3,777.7 1,071.6 Lakewood Lakewood CDP (53,805), Leisure
Village
(4,400), Leisure Village
East
(4,217)
Lavallette 14 borough 1,875 3,207 0.95 0.15 0.81 2,319.2 3,966.8 Point Pleasant Beach (9–12) (S/R)
Lavallette (K-8)
Little Egg Harbor 33 township 20,065 10,324 73.05 25.69 47.37 423.6 218.0 Pinelands Regional (7–12)
Little Egg Harbor (PK-6)
Mystic Island (8,493), Nugentown,
Parkertown Warren Grove, West
Tuckerton
Long Beach 32 township 3,051 9,216 22.04 16.59 5.44 560.5 1,693.0 Southern Regional (7–12)
Long Beach Island (PK-6)
High Bar Harbor, Loveladies, North
Beach Haven
(2,235)
Manchester 25 township 43,070 25,886 82.69 1.07 81.62 527.7 317.2 Manchester Bullock, Cedar Glen Lakes (1,421),
Cedar Glen West (1,267), Crestwood
Village
(7,907), Leisure Knoll (2,490),
Leisure Village West (3,493), Pine Lake
Park
(8,707), Pine Ridge at Crestwood
(2,369), Ridgeway, Roosevelt City,
Wheatland, Whiting
Mantoloking 15 borough 296 535 0.64 0.26 0.39 767.9 1,387.9 Point Pleasant Beach (9–12) (S/R)
Ocean Gate 9 borough 2,011 1,203 0.45 0.01 0.45 4,490.3 2,686.1 Central Regional (7–12)
Ocean Gate (PK-6)
Ocean Township 28 township 8,332 4,291 32.04 11.49 20.56 405.3 208.8 Southern Regional (7–12) (S/R) (9–12)
Ocean Township (PK-6)
Brookville, Waretown (1,569)
Pine Beach 11 borough 2,127 903 0.62 0.00 0.61 3,465.4 1,471.2 Toms River
Plumsted Township 20 township 8,421 3,067 40.15 0.44 39.71 212.1 77.2 Plumsted Township Archertown, Brindletown, New
Egypt
(2,512)
Point Pleasant 18 borough 18,392 8,331 4.17 0.68 3.49 5,272.1 2,388.1 Point Pleasant
Point Pleasant Beach 17 borough 4,665 3,373 1.74 0.32 1.43 3,270.1 2,364.4 Point Pleasant Beach Clark's Landing
Seaside Heights 8 borough 2,887 3,003 0.75 0.13 0.62 4,662.9 4,850.2 Central Regional (7–12)
Seaside Heights (PK-6)
Seaside Park 7 borough 1,579 2,703 0.77 0.12 0.65 2,429.4 4,158.7 Central Regional (7–12)
Lavallette (K-6) (Opt. 1)
Toms River (K-6) (Opt. 2)
Ship Bottom 3 borough 1,156 2,066 1.00 0.29 0.71 1,620.6 2,896.3 Southern Regional (7–12)
Long Beach Island (PK-6)
South Toms River 13 borough 3,684 1,160 1.23 0.06 1.17 3,146.7 990.8 Toms River
Stafford Township 30 township 26,535 13,604 54.88 9.03 45.85 578.8 296.7 Southern Regional (7–12)
Stafford Township (PK-6)
Beach Haven West (3,896), Cedar
Run
, Manahawkin (2,303), Mayetta,
Ocean Acres (part; 15,217 of
16,142), Warren Grove
Surf City 4 borough 1,205 2,566 0.92 0.17 0.75 1,616.5 3,442.4 Southern Regional (7–12)
Long Beach Island (PK-6)
Toms River 24 township 91,239 43,334 52.88 12.40 40.49 2,253.5 1,070.3 Toms River Cattus Island, Chadwick Beach Island,
Dover Beaches North (1,239), Dover
Beaches South
(1,209), Gilford Park,
Pelican Island, Silverton
Tuckerton 1 borough 3,347 1,902 3.80 0.44 3.36 995.1 565.5 Pinelands Regional (7–12)
Tuckerton (PK-6)
Ocean County county 576,567 278,052 915.40 286.62 628.78 917.0 442.2

See also

References

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Further reading