Delaware County
County of Delaware, Pennsylvania
Delaware County Courthouse in Media, viewed from south
Delaware County Courthouse in Media, viewed from south
Official seal of Delaware County
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Delaware County
Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Map of the United States highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°55′N 75°24′W / 39.92°N 75.4°W / 39.92; -75.4
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
FoundedSeptember 26, 1789
Named forDelaware River
SeatMedia
Largest cityChester
Area
 • Total191 sq mi (490 km2)
 • Land184 sq mi (480 km2)
 • Water6.8 sq mi (18 km2)  3.5%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
566,747
 • Density3,065/sq mi (1,183/km2)
Congressional district5th
Websitedelcopa.gov
DesignatedOctober 3, 1982[1]
Interactive map of Delaware County, Pennsylvania

Delaware County, colloquially referred to as Delco,[2] is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania that borders Philadelphia. With a population of 566,747,[3] it is the fifth most populous county in Pennsylvania, and the third smallest in area. The county was created on September 26, 1789, from part of Chester County, and named for the Delaware River.

Its county seat is Media.[4] Until 1850, Chester was the county seat of Delaware County and, before that, of Chester County.

Delaware County is adjacent to the city-county of Philadelphia and is included in the PhiladelphiaCamdenWilmington, PA–NJDEMD Metropolitan Statistical Area. Delaware County is the only county covered in its entirety by area codes 610 and 484.

History

Map of the early settlements of Delaware County, Pennsylvania
Map of the early settlements of Delaware County, Pennsylvania
The old Chester Courthouse, built in 1724.
The old Chester Courthouse, built in 1724.

Delaware County lies in the river and bay drainage area named "Delaware" in honor of Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, Governor of the nearby English colony of Virginia. The land was explored by Henry Hudson in 1609, and over the next several decades it was variously claimed and settled by the Swedes, the Dutch, and the English. Its original human inhabitants were the Lenni-Lenape tribe of American Indians.

Once the Dutch were defeated and the extent of New York was determined, King Charles II of England made his grant to William Penn in order to found the colony which came to be named Pennsylvania. Penn divided his colony into three counties: Bucks, Philadelphia, and Chester. The riverfront land south of Philadelphia, being the most accessible, was quickly granted and settled. In 1789, the southeastern portion of Chester County was divided from the rest and named Delaware County for the Delaware River.

Geography

Bartram's Covered Bridge, built 1860 west of Newtown Square, crosses Crum Creek into Chester County.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 191 square miles (490 km2), of which 184 square miles (480 km2) is land and 6.8 square miles (18 km2) (3.5%) is water.[5] It is the third-smallest county in Pennsylvania by area.

Delaware County is roughly diamond- or kite-shaped, with the four sides formed by the Chester County boundary to the northwest, the boundary with the state of Delaware (a portion of the "Twelve Mile Circle") to the southwest, the Delaware River (forming the border with the state of New Jersey) to the southeast, and the city of Philadelphia and Montgomery County to the east and northeast.

The lowest point in the state of Pennsylvania is located on the Delaware River in Marcus Hook in Delaware County, where it flows out of Pennsylvania and into Delaware. The highest point in Delaware County is 500 feet at two points southeast of Wyola in Newtown Township [1].

Newlin Mill, built 1704, on the west branch of Chester Creek, near Concordville.
Newlin Mill, built 1704, on the west branch of Chester Creek, near Concordville.

Waterways in Delaware County generally flow in a southward direction and ultimately drain into the Delaware River. The waterways are, from west to east: the Brandywine River (forming a portion of the county's western boundary with Chester County), Naaman's Creek, Stoney Creek, Chester Creek, Ridley Creek, Crum Creek, Muckinipates Creek, Darby Creek and Cobbs Creek (forming a portion of the county's eastern boundary with Philadelphia). Crum Creek was dammed in 1931 near Pennsylvania Route 252 to fill Springton Lake (also known as Geist Reservoir), an approximately 391-acre (1.58 km2)[6] drinking water reservoir maintained by Aqua America, the county's largest lake.

The Trainer Refinery and the Port of Chester are located along the shores of the Delaware River.

Adjacent counties

Delaware County is one of four counties in the United States to border a state with which it shares the same name (the other three are Nevada County, California, Texas County, Oklahoma, and Ohio County, West Virginia).

National protected areas

John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge
John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge

State protected area

2,600 acres (11 km2) of the county are occupied by the Ridley Creek State Park.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17909,469
180012,80935.3%
181014,73415.0%
182014,8100.5%
183017,32317.0%
184019,79114.2%
185024,67924.7%
186030,59724.0%
187039,40328.8%
188056,10142.4%
189074,68333.1%
190094,76226.9%
1910117,90624.4%
1920173,08446.8%
1930280,26461.9%
1940310,75610.9%
1950414,23433.3%
1960553,15433.5%
1970600,0358.5%
1980555,007−7.5%
1990547,651−1.3%
2000550,8640.6%
2010558,9791.5%
2020576,8303.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790–1960[8] 1900–1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2010–2019[3][11]

As of the 2010 census, the county was 71.1% White non-Hispanic, 19.7% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American or Alaskan Native, 4.7% Asian, <0.1% Native Hawaiian, 2.0% were two or more races, and 0.9% were some other race. 3.0% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.

As of the 2000 census, there were 550,864 people, 206,320 households, and 139,472 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,990 people per square mile (1,155/km2). There were 216,978 housing units at an average density of 1,178 per square mile (455/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 80.3% White, 14.5% African American, 0.1% Native American, 3.3% Asian, <0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. 1.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.6% were of Irish, 17.5% Italian, 10.1% German and 6.7% English ancestry.

There were 206,320 households, out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.8% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.9 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,092, and the median income for a family was $61,590. Males had a median income of $44,155 versus $31,831 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,040. About 5.8% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Map of Delaware County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).
Map of Delaware County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and exactly one town. There are 49 municipalities in Delaware County:

City

Boroughs

Townships

Census-designated places

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Unincorporated communities

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Delaware County.[12]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Upper Darby Township 82,795
2 Haverford Township 48,491
3 Chester City 33,972
4 Radnor Township 31,531
5 Drexel Hill CDP 28,043
6 Springfield Township 24,211
7 Ardmore (partially in Montgomery County) CDP 12,455
8 Yeadon Borough 11,443
9 Broomall CDP 10,789
10 Darby Borough 10,687
11 Lansdowne Borough 10,620
12 Woodlyn CDP 9,485
13 Collingdale Borough 8,786
14 Folsom CDP 8,323
15 Brookhaven Borough 8,006
16 Village Green-Green Ridge CDP 7,822
17 Glenolden Borough 7,153
18 Ridley Park Borough 7,002
19 Clifton Heights Borough 6,652
20 Folcroft Borough 6,606
21 Prospect Park Borough 6,454
22 Swarthmore Borough 6,194
23 Norwood Borough 5,890
24 Sharon Hill Borough 5,697
25 Media Borough 5,327
26 Boothwyn CDP 4,933
27 Aldan Borough 4,152
28 Linwood CDP 3,281
29 Upland Borough 3,239
30 Lima CDP 2,735
31 Morton Borough 2,669
32 East Lansdowne Borough 2,668
33 Colwyn Borough 2,546
34 Chester Heights Borough 2,531
35 Eddystone Borough 2,410
36 Marcus Hook Borough 2,397
37 Parkside Borough 2,328
38 Trainer Borough 1,828
39 Haverford College (partially in Montgomery County) CDP 1,331
40 Millbourne Borough 1,159
41 Cheyney University (mostly in Chester County) CDP 988
42 Rose Valley Borough 913
43 Rutledge Borough 784

Politics and government

United States presidential election results for Delaware County, Pennsylvania[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 118,639 36.02% 206,709 62.75% 4,056 1.23%
2016 110,667 36.97% 177,402 59.27% 11,267 3.76%
2012 110,853 38.82% 171,792 60.16% 2,919 1.02%
2008 115,273 38.75% 178,870 60.12% 3,367 1.13%
2004 120,425 42.32% 162,601 57.15% 1,512 0.53%
2000 105,836 42.66% 134,861 54.36% 7,380 2.97%
1996 92,628 39.46% 115,946 49.39% 26,174 11.15%
1992 108,587 40.81% 111,210 41.80% 46,277 17.39%
1988 147,656 59.95% 96,144 39.03% 2,505 1.02%
1984 161,754 61.79% 98,207 37.51% 1,821 0.70%
1980 143,282 55.78% 88,314 34.38% 25,263 9.84%
1976 148,679 54.88% 117,252 43.28% 4,963 1.83%
1972 175,414 63.91% 94,144 34.30% 4,893 1.78%
1968 133,777 50.21% 106,695 40.05% 25,964 9.74%
1964 111,189 42.91% 147,189 56.81% 717 0.28%
1960 135,672 52.02% 124,629 47.79% 482 0.18%
1956 143,663 63.51% 82,024 36.26% 523 0.23%
1952 129,743 61.56% 80,316 38.11% 689 0.33%
1948 93,412 60.93% 57,156 37.28% 2,747 1.79%
1944 78,533 54.80% 64,021 44.67% 755 0.53%
1940 80,158 56.88% 60,225 42.73% 549 0.39%
1936 74,899 52.37% 65,117 45.53% 2,997 2.10%
1932 75,291 68.19% 32,413 29.36% 2,705 2.45%
1928 83,092 73.57% 29,378 26.01% 471 0.42%
1924 41,998 81.80% 6,368 12.40% 2,979 5.80%
1920 34,126 75.34% 9,602 21.20% 1,565 3.46%
1916 16,315 65.96% 7,742 31.30% 677 2.74%
1912 8,418 36.23% 6,001 25.82% 8,819 37.95%
1908 15,184 70.75% 5,727 26.69% 550 2.56%
1904 15,032 78.15% 3,586 18.64% 618 3.21%
1900 13,794 74.96% 4,249 23.09% 358 1.95%
1896 13,979 75.27% 4,169 22.45% 424 2.28%
1892 9,272 60.72% 5,520 36.15% 477 3.12%
1888 8,791 62.04% 5,028 35.48% 351 2.48%
1884 7,512 61.27% 4,538 37.01% 211 1.72%
1880 7,008 60.84% 4,473 38.83% 38 0.33%


The county has operated under a home-rule charter with five at-large council-members since 1972.

As of November 1, 2021, there are 407,694 registered voters in Delaware County.[14]

Until the 1990s, Delaware County was regarded as a strongly Republican county. The Delaware County Republican political machine was controlled by William McClure and his son John J. McClure from 1875 to 1965.[15] Delaware County voted for the Republican candidate in nearly every election from 1854 through 1988, one of the few exceptions being Lyndon Johnson's national landslide of 1964. As a measure of how Republican the county was, Franklin Roosevelt was completely shut out in all four of his successful campaigns for president. Even in his 46-state landslide victory of 1936, Roosevelt only got 45 percent of Delaware County's vote.

In 1992, however, the county swung from a 21-point win for George H. W. Bush to a narrow one-point win for Bill Clinton, who became only the second Democrat to win the county in the 20th century. Clinton won it just under 10 points in 1996, coming up just short of a majority. The county has gone Democratic in every Presidential election since then by 10 points or more by progressively-increasing margins. In the 2004 election Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry won the county by 14 points. Barack Obama won it by resounding 21-point margins in each of his bids for president. Hillary Clinton carried it by 22 points in 2016. Joe Biden carried it in 2020 with 62 percent of the vote, his second-strongest performance in Pennsylvania. Donald Trump turned in the worst showing for a Republican in the county in over 160 years.

Driving the county's Democratic shift have been longstanding trends in voter registration advantage and demographics. In 1998, Republicans held a voter registration advantage of about 125,000,[16] but by 2008 that advantage had shrunk to under 20,000 voters.[17] As of the November 2021 election, Democrats enjoyed a voter registration advantage of 50,000. Propelling and compounding the voter registration shift has been a change in demographics in the county. Since the 2000 Census, the White population of the county has decreased from 80.3% to 68.5% as of the 2020 Census, while, the Black population has risen from 14.5% to 22.7%, driven by the gentrification of Philadelphia and University City neighborhood and rapid demographic shift in Upper Darby. [18][19] [20] Further increasing the shift has been the change in education level demographics in the county, as voters have become more college educated and white collar (and, in turn, less blue collar) over the past few decades.

While the longstanding Republican registration edge has been erased, Republicans still remain competitive with Democrats at the state and local level. Most Republicans from the county tend to be fiscally conservative and socially moderate, as is the case with Republicans from most suburban Philadelphia counties. In the 2004 US Senate election, Republican Arlen Specter defeated Joe Hoeffel but Democrat Bob Casey, Jr. defeated Rick Santorum in the 2006 Senate election. All three Democratic state row office candidates carried it in 2008. In 2016, Delaware County elected all Democrats in national office elections except Republican Patrick Meehan (U.S. Representative).[21]

After the election of Donald Trump in 2016, the county rapidly shifted blue as a result of increased Democratic turnout and less enthusiasm from often less conservative suburban Republicans. In the 2019 elections for the Delaware County Council, Democrats swept the board and elected Monica Taylor, Elaine P. Schaefer, and Christine Reuther, gaining control of the county Council for the first time since the Civil War.[22] This was the first time in history that the county had an all-Democratic Council.[23]

As of 2020, all of Delaware County is located in the state's 5th congressional district, represented by Democrat Mary Gay Scanlon. Prior to 2019, most of Delaware County had been in the 7th congressional district. The district had been held for 20 years by Republican Curt Weldon until he was ousted by Joe Sestak, a retired admiral, in the 2006 U.S. House of Representatives election. Also in the 2006 election, Democrat Bryan Lentz unseated Republican incumbent State Representative Tom Gannon in the 161st House district. In 2010 Sestak ran for the senate seat vacated by Arlen Specter and was replaced by Republican Pat Meehan, who defeated Lentz, the Democratic candidate. Lentz was replaced in the State House by Joe Hackett, a Republican. Meehan represented the 7th district until his resignation on April 27, 2018.[24] Before it was thrown out by a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision in 2018, the 7th Congressional District had been regarded one of the most irregularly drawn districts in the nation.[25]


Delaware County Council

As of March 2, 2022:[26]

Office Holder Party
Chair Dr. Monica Taylor Democratic
Vice-Chair Elaine Paul Schaefer Democratic
Member of Council Kevin M. Madden Democratic
Member of Council Christine Reuther Democratic
Member of Council Richard Womack Democratic

County row officers

Row officers, a term unique to Pennsylvania, are a conglomeration of elected officials defined by Article IX, Section 4 of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This unit of officers includes the position of controller, District Attorney, treasurer, sheriff, register of wills, recorder of deeds, prothonotaries, clerks of the court, and the coroner. It is thought that this term originated because these positions were arranged in a row on a typical ballot.[27]

Office Holder Party
Controller Joanne Phillips, Esquire Democratic
District Attorney Jack Stollsteimer Democratic
Register of Wills Rachel Ezell Berry Democratic
Sheriff Jerry Sanders Democratic

United States Senate

Senator Party
Pat Toomey Republican
Bob Casey Democratic

United States House of Representatives

The 2018 congressional map ordered by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania places all of Delaware County within the new 5th congressional district.
The 2018 congressional map ordered by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania places all of Delaware County within the new 5th congressional district.

As of July 23, 2021:

District Representative Party
5 Mary Gay Scanlon Democratic

State Senate

As of July 23, 2021:

District Representative Party
8 Anthony Hardy Williams Democratic
9 John I. Kane Democratic
17 Amanda Cappelletti Democratic
26 Tim Kearney Democratic

State House of Representatives

As of March 2, 2022:

District Representative Party
159 Brian Joseph Kirkland Democratic
160 Craig Williams Republican
161 Leanne Krueger Democratic
162 Dave Delloso Democratic
163 Mike Zabel Democratic
164 Gina H. Curry Democratic
165 Jennifer O’Mara Democratic
166 Greg Vitali Democratic
168 Chris Quinn Republican
185 Regina Young Democratic
191 Joanna McClinton Democratic

Corrections

The George W. Hill Correctional Facility (Delaware County Prison) is located in Thornbury Township.[28][29] The jail houses pre-trial inmates and convicted persons who are serving sentences of no longer than two years less one day.[29] It is operated by the for-profit prison corporation GEO Group, of Boca Raton, Florida. It is the only privately operated county-level correctional facility in Pennsylvania, although there are plans for it to be deprivatized as early as December 31, 2020.[30][31]

Education

Map of Delaware County, Pennsylvania School Districts
Map of Delaware County, Pennsylvania School Districts

Public school districts

Charter schools

Private schools

In 1963 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia had 48 Catholic K-8/elementary schools in Delaware County with a total of 39,695 students, which was the highest ever enrollment. From 1971 to 2012, 20 of these schools closed, with ten of them closing from 2003 to 2012. By 2012 there were 28 Catholic K-8/elementary schools in Delaware County with a total of 8,291 students.[32] One notable private school is Friends School Haverford.

Colleges and universities

Library at Cheyney University
Library at Cheyney University
Benjamin West Birthplace on the campus of Swarthmore College
Benjamin West Birthplace on the campus of Swarthmore College
Old Main at Widener University
Old Main at Widener University

Adult education

Libraries

Main article: List of public libraries in Delaware County, Pennsylvania

Transportation

Delaware County is bisected north to south by Blue Route Interstate 476, which connects I-76 just north of the extreme northern corner of the county to I-95, which parallels the Delaware River along the southeastern edge of the county.

Delaware County is home to SEPTA's 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, and is served by the Norristown High Speed Line (P&W), two Red Arrow trolley lines (Routes 101 and 102), four Regional Rail Lines (the Airport Line, Wilmington/Newark Line, Media/Elwyn Line, and Paoli/Thorndale Line), and a host of bus routes.

The western portion of Philadelphia International Airport is located in Delaware County, and the county hosts some airport-related commerce such as Philadelphia's UPS terminal and airport hotels.

Major roads and highways

Recreation

Parks

Dam on Ridley Creek in Ridley Creek State Park
Dam on Ridley Creek in Ridley Creek State Park
Old Rose Tree Tavern in Rose Tree Park.
Old Rose Tree Tavern in Rose Tree Park.

There is one Pennsylvania state park in Delaware County.

County parks include:

Racing

Harrah's Philadelphia Casino & Racetrack is a harness racing track and casino (i.e., "racino") located on the Chester, Pennsylvania waterfront. It is owned by Vici Properties and operated by Caesars Entertainment.

Sports

The city of Chester is home to the Philadelphia Union of Major League Soccer. The team plays at Talen Energy Stadium, a venue located at the base of the Commodore Barry Bridge.

Delaware County is the traditional home of women's professional soccer in the Philadelphia area. The former Philadelphia Charge of the defunct Women's United Soccer Association played at Villanova Stadium, which is located on the campus of Villanova University. The Philadelphia Independence of Women's Professional Soccer succeeded the Charge and played at Widener University's Leslie Quick Stadium in 2011.

Delaware County is the home of one of oldest baseball leagues in the country, the Delco League, which at one time was known for featuring future, former, and even current major league players who were offered more money than their current teams would pay them.[36][37][38]

Every summer, Delaware County is home to the Delco Pro-Am, a basketball league consisting of current, future, and former NBA players as well as local standout players.[39]

Delaware County is also the former home of a rugby league team called the Aston Bulls, a member of the American National Rugby League.

Darby was home to the Hilldale Club, the 1925 Colored World Series Champions.

Media

The county itself is serviced by several newspapers, most notably the News of Delaware County, the Delaware County Daily Times, The Suburban and Wayne Times, and The Spirit, the only minority owned newspaper serving Delaware County.[citation needed] The Philadelphia Inquirer also has a significant presence, reflecting Philadelphia's influence on Delaware County and the rest of the metro. Delaware County Magazine is the news magazine with the largest circulation in Delaware County, reaching over 186,000 homes.

Climate

Delaware County has two physical geographic regions: the Piedmont and the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Most of the county has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa) while some higher northern areas have a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa.). The hardiness zones are 7a and 7b.

Climate data for Newtown Square (Elevation: 456 ft (139 m)) 1981–2010 Averages
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 38.6
(3.7)
41.8
(5.4)
50.4
(10.2)
62.3
(16.8)
72.1
(22.3)
81.0
(27.2)
85.3
(29.6)
83.5
(28.6)
76.8
(24.9)
65.5
(18.6)
54.1
(12.3)
42.6
(5.9)
62.9
(17.2)
Daily mean °F (°C) 30.4
(−0.9)
33.1
(0.6)
40.6
(4.8)
51.6
(10.9)
61.2
(16.2)
70.5
(21.4)
75.2
(24.0)
73.7
(23.2)
66.3
(19.1)
55.0
(12.8)
44.8
(7.1)
34.6
(1.4)
53.2
(11.8)
Average low °F (°C) 22.2
(−5.4)
24.3
(−4.3)
30.9
(−0.6)
40.8
(4.9)
50.2
(10.1)
60.0
(15.6)
65.1
(18.4)
63.8
(17.7)
55.7
(13.2)
44.4
(6.9)
35.5
(1.9)
26.6
(−3.0)
43.4
(6.3)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.36
(85)
2.80
(71)
3.89
(99)
3.84
(98)
4.08
(104)
3.94
(100)
4.71
(120)
3.88
(99)
4.65
(118)
3.87
(98)
3.61
(92)
3.89
(99)
46.52
(1,182)
Average relative humidity (%) 68.3 65.0 60.5 59.4 63.2 68.2 68.2 70.5 71.7 70.5 69.7 70.8 67.2
Average dew point °F (°C) 21.2
(−6.0)
22.6
(−5.2)
28.0
(−2.2)
37.9
(3.3)
48.6
(9.2)
59.5
(15.3)
64.0
(17.8)
63.5
(17.5)
56.9
(13.8)
45.6
(7.6)
35.5
(1.9)
26.1
(−3.3)
42.5
(5.8)
Source: PRISM[40]
Climate data for Chester (Elevation: 10 ft (3 m)) 1981–2010 Averages
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 40.5
(4.7)
44.2
(6.8)
52.0
(11.1)
63.4
(17.4)
73.4
(23.0)
82.7
(28.2)
87.0
(30.6)
85.2
(29.6)
78.3
(25.7)
66.7
(19.3)
56.1
(13.4)
45.0
(7.2)
64.6
(18.1)
Daily mean °F (°C) 33.7
(0.9)
36.5
(2.5)
43.7
(6.5)
54.3
(12.4)
64.1
(17.8)
73.7
(23.2)
78.3
(25.7)
76.8
(24.9)
69.5
(20.8)
58.1
(14.5)
48.3
(9.1)
38.2
(3.4)
56.4
(13.6)
Average low °F (°C) 26.8
(−2.9)
28.9
(−1.7)
35.3
(1.8)
45.2
(7.3)
54.8
(12.7)
64.6
(18.1)
69.7
(20.9)
68.4
(20.2)
60.7
(15.9)
49.4
(9.7)
40.5
(4.7)
31.4
(−0.3)
48.1
(8.9)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.15
(80)
2.70
(69)
3.87
(98)
3.62
(92)
3.81
(97)
3.80
(97)
4.65
(118)
3.56
(90)
4.21
(107)
3.44
(87)
3.27
(83)
3.62
(92)
43.70
(1,110)
Average relative humidity (%) 65.3 60.7 57.6 57.2 60.8 62.7 64.4 65.8 67.8 67.3 65.3 65.1 63.4
Average dew point °F (°C) 23.3
(−4.8)
24.2
(−4.3)
29.7
(−1.3)
39.5
(4.2)
50.3
(10.2)
60.2
(15.7)
65.3
(18.5)
64.5
(18.1)
58.4
(14.7)
47.3
(8.5)
37.2
(2.9)
27.5
(−2.5)
44.0
(6.7)
Source: PRISM[40]

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ "PHMC Historical Markers Search" (Searchable database). Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  2. ^ "Delco Sheriff: Don't fall for jury duty scam". Delco Times. Retrieved July 1, 2014.; McCrystal, Laura (June 27, 2014). "Voting Wards To Be Changed in Delco's Radnor Township". Philly.com. Retrieved July 1, 2014.; McCrystal, Laura (June 30, 2014). "Roadwork in Delco to affect I-95 and I-476 this week". Philly.com. Retrieved July 1, 2014.; DaGrassa, Peg (June 27, 2014). "Here's the Scoop on Ross, Fresh Stop, KFC and Other Delco Businesses". Delco News Network. Retrieved July 1, 2014.; Kurtz, Paul (June 27, 2014). "Delco Homeless Families Get A Day of Escapist Fun". CBS Philly. Retrieved July 1, 2014.;"Delco's bars, taverns are really heating up". Delco Times. June 16, 2014. Retrieved July 1, 2014.
  3. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts" (PDF). Delaware County. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 8, 2017.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  6. ^ "Crum". Chester – Ridley – Crum Watersheds Association. Archived from the original on October 16, 2008.
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  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  11. ^ "Census 2020".
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  15. ^ McLarnon, John Morrison (2003). Ruling Suburbia: John J. McClure and the Republican Machine in Delaware County. Newark, Delaware: University of Delaware Press. p. 11. ISBN 0-87413-814-0. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  16. ^ "Error" (PDF).
  17. ^ "Error" (PDF).
  18. ^ http://45.79.181.212:8080/county/PA/Delaware[bare URL]
  19. ^ https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/delawarecountypennsylvania[bare URL]
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  22. ^ "Democrats make history by winning control of Delaware County".
  23. ^ "Democrats Sweep Delaware County Council Race In Historic Election". Media, PA Patch. November 5, 2019. Retrieved November 23, 2019.
  24. ^ Tamari, Jonathan (April 27, 2018). "Rep. Pat Meehan resigns; will pay back $39,000 used for harassment settlement". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  25. ^ Ingraham, Christopher. "This is the best explanation of gerrymandering you will ever see". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 2, 2015.
  26. ^ "Elected Officials - Delaware County, Pennsylvania". delcopa.gov.
  27. ^ Sentinel, Daniel Walmer, The. "Row officers: What is their role in county government?". The Sentinel. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  28. ^ "Chapter 7 7–11 Archived March 20, 2012, at the Wayback Machine." Comprehensive Zoning Plan. Thornbury Township. Retrieved on September 6, 2011. "The three major institutions found in the Township, the Delaware County Prison, Glen Mills Schools and Cheyney University[...]"
  29. ^ a b Delaware County Prison at the Wayback Machine (archived September 2, 2011)." Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Retrieved on September 6, 2011. "George W. Hill Correctional Facility (Delaware County Prison), which is located on 500 Cheyney Road in Thornbury Township[...]"
  30. ^ Twitter, Kathleen E. Carey kcarey@21st-centurymedia com @dtbusiness on. "Council takes first steps to deprivatize prison". The Delaware County Daily Times. Retrieved March 2, 2020. ((cite web)): |last= has generic name (help)
  31. ^ Twitter, Kathleen E. Carey kcarey@21st-centurymedia com @dtbusiness on. "GEO asks to exit prison operations by Dec. 31". The Delaware County Daily Times. Retrieved March 12, 2020. ((cite web)): |last= has generic name (help)
  32. ^ "Season of Change: New regional schools poised to replace long-time Delco Catholic institutions". Delco Times. June 10, 2012. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  33. ^ "Haverford Township Adult School". Haverford Township Adult School.
  34. ^ "MainLine School Night -". mainlineschoolnight.org.
  35. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 25, 2010. Retrieved March 26, 2010.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  36. ^ "Delco League". leaguelineup.com. Archived from the original on October 12, 2014. Retrieved October 8, 2014.
  37. ^ "Delco League to honor legends of ballfields from 105 seasons". Delco Times. Retrieved October 8, 2014.
  38. ^ "COLTS BOLT BOROUGH: Collingdale's Delco Baseball League team is the latest loss endured by tiny town". Delco Times. Retrieved October 8, 2014.
  39. ^ "Plenty of talent as Delco Pro-Am League tips off". Delco Times. Retrieved October 8, 2014.
  40. ^ a b "PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University". Retrieved August 9, 2019.

Further reading

Coordinates: 39°55′N 75°24′W / 39.92°N 75.40°W / 39.92; -75.40