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F-clamps

An F-clamp, also known as a bar clamp or speed clamp, is a type of clamp. The name comes from its "F" shape. This tool is used in woodworking while more permanent attachment is being made with screws or glue, or in metalworking to hold pieces together for welding or bolting. F-clamps are similar to but distinct from C-clamps and pipe clamps.

Description

An F-clamp is a type of clamp. It also known as a bar clamp or speed clamp. An F-clamp consists of two horizontal bars joined together by a vertical bar. This gives the clamp an appearance of the letter F. There is a large screw on the lower bar to allow for the clamp to be tightened.[1] F-clamps are adjustable, which allows for them to be used on larger scale objects without the need for a large screw.

Use

This tool is used in woodworking while more permanent attachment is being made with screws or glue, or in metalworking to hold pieces together for welding or bolting.[2]

An F-clamp is also a simple mechanical device used for lifting engine or transmission parts. The clamp has an adjusting screw to tighten onto the part and a lifting ring to attach a hoist cable.[citation needed]

Similar devices

The F-clamp is similar to a C-clamp in use, but has a wider opening capacity (throat). F-clamps in the industry terminology have the jaws mounted on a flat bar, while a pipe clamp, which has the same construction, is mounted on a pipe, normally of 1/2" or 3/4" diameter.

References

  1. ^ Hill, Jack; Scott, Ernest (2001). Working in Wood: An Introduction. p. 34. ISBN 9781585742196.
  2. ^ Woodwork: A Step-by-Step Photographic Guide to Successful Woodworking. DK Publishing. 2010. p. 41. ISBN 9780756670023. Archived from the original on 2023-09-06. Retrieved 2016-10-28.