Mangog
Mangog.jpg
Mangog on the cover of Thor #155 (Aug. 1968).
Art by Jack Kirby and Vince Colletta.
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceThor #154 (July 1968)
Created byStan Lee (writer)
Jack Kirby (artist)
In-story information
PartnershipsThanos
Notable aliasesOdin
AbilitiesSuperhuman strength, stamina, durability and endurance
Shapeshifting and energy projection via magic manipulation
Immortality
Self-resurrection
Empathic ability to feed on the hatred of sentient beings
Empowerment from the selfish acts of gods

Mangog is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Publication history

The character first appeared in Thor #154 (July 1968) and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.[1]

Fictional character biography

The character was described in his debut as being the sum total of the hatred of "a billion billion beings" - an alien race that once attempted to invade Asgard (thwarted by Odin, the ruler of Asgard and the Norse gods).[2] Imprisoned beneath Asgard, Mangog is freed by the rock troll Ulik, in a failed bid to secure an ally against the gods. Mangog storms Asgard, intent on drawing the Odinsword from its scabbard which will end the universe. Thor battles Mangog to a standstill, until Odin dissolves the creature by breaking the spell which had created Mangog as a living prison for his entire race.[3]

Mangog reappeared when freed by the god Loki, but was defeated when removed from the source of its power.[4] With the aid of the traitorous magician Igron, Mangog assumes the form of an imprisoned Odin, and intends to once again draw the Odinsword. After a series of skirmishes with Thor, the creature is defeated when Thor frees Odin.[5]

The character reappears twice in the second volume of Thor: as the servant of a clone of the Titan Thanos (destroyed by Thor)[6] and in a desolated Asgard during Ragnarok (dispelled by Thor with the Odinforce)[7] Mangog reappears in the Thunderstrike mini-series when accidentally summoned by a mystical generator, and is eventually defeated when cast into a distant star.[8]

Reappearing in The Mighty Thor, Mangog decimates Asgard until he was hurled by Jane Foster (the new Thor) into the sun.[9]

Powers and abilities

Mangog possesses the strength, stamina, durability and endurance of a "billion billion beings",[10] and has the ability to manipulate magic for energy projection and shapeshifting.

The character appears to be indestructible, and has stated it will always exist so long as there is hatred.[11] Mangog is also called "the Judgement of the Gods", drawing strength from every cruel act performed by the gods.[12]

Other versions

Heroes Reborn

In an alternate reality depicted in the 2021 "Heroes Reborn" miniseries, the Mangog became the All-Gog: Final All-Father, Destroyer of Asgard after devouring most of the Asgardians. Following this, he went on to destroy Asgard and join the Masters of Doom. While fighting Power Princess in the present however, she uses one of her gauntlets to badly injure him before turning him into a statue.[13][14]

Marvel Fanfare

In an alternate universe, Mangog battles the Herald of Galactus, Silver Surfer.[15]

What If?

Mangog attempts to take advantage of Odin's need for the Odinsleep but is stopped by Jane Foster, who has found Thor's hammer Mjolnir.[16]

Ultimate Marvel

In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Mangog is a spirit requiring a host form and battles Thor and Spider-Man.[17]

In other media

Television

Mangog appears in the Avengers Assemble animated series episode "All-Father's Day", voiced by JB Blanc.[18]

Video games

Board games

Mangog appears in the superhero board game Heroclix in 2017 as part of "The Mighty Thor" set of collectible miniatures.

References

  1. ^ Brevoort, Tom; DeFalco, Tom; Manning, Matthew K.; Sanderson, Peter; Wiacek, Win (2017). Marvel Year By Year: A Visual History. DK Publishing. p. 131. ISBN 978-1465455505.
  2. ^ Wells, John (2014). American Comic Book Chronicles: 1965-1969. TwoMorrows Publishing. p. 198. ISBN 978-1605490557.
  3. ^ Thor #154-157 (July-Oct. 1968). Marvel Comics.
  4. ^ Thor #195-198 (Jan. - April 1972). Marvel Comics.
  5. ^ Thor #242 (Dec. 1975); 244 (Feb. 1975) 246-250 (April-Aug. 1976). Marvel Comics.
  6. ^ Thor vol. 2 #20-25 (Feb.-July 2000). Marvel Comics.
  7. ^ Thor vol. 2 #84 (Nov. 2004). Marvel Comics.
  8. ^ Thunderstrike vol. 2 #5 (June 2011)
  9. ^ The Mighty Thor #705 (Feb. 2018). Marvel Comics.
  10. ^ Thor #157 (Oct. 1968). Marvel Comics.
  11. ^ Thunderstrike vol. 2 #5. Marvel Comics.
  12. ^ The Mighty Thor #701 (Nov. 2017). Marvel Comics.
  13. ^ Heroes Reborn vol. 2 #1. Marvel Comics.
  14. ^ Heroes Reborn vol. 2 #6. Marvel Comics.
  15. ^ Marvel Fanfare #51 (June 1982). Marvel Comics.
  16. ^ What If? #10 (Aug. 1978). Marvel Comics.
  17. ^ Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man #150 (Jan. 2011). Marvel Comics.
  18. ^ "Marvel's Avengers Assemble, "All-Father's Day"". 23 Mar 2014. Retrieved 30 Mar 2014.