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Parliament of Jamaica

Paaliment
14th Parliament of Jamaica
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
HousesSenate
House of Representatives
Leadership
Charles III
since 8 September 2022
Patrick L. Allen
since 26 February 2009
Juliet Holness, JLP
since 26 September 2023
Thomas Tavares-Finson, JLP
since 10 March 2016
Structure
Seats84
21 Senators
63 Members of Parliament
Senate political groups
HM Government

  Jamaica Labour Party (13)

Official Opposition
  People's National Party (8)
House of Representatives political groups
HM Government

  Jamaica Labour Party (49)

Official Opposition
  People's National Party (14)
Elections
Appointed by the Governor-General of Jamaica on advice of the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition
House of Representatives voting system
First-past-the-post
Last House of Representatives election
3 September 2020
Next House of Representatives election
2025
Meeting place
George William Gordon House, Kingston, Jamaica
Website
japarliament.gov.jm

17°58′26″N 76°47′26″W / 17.9740°N 76.7906°W / 17.9740; -76.7906

The Parliament of Jamaica (Jamaican Patois: Paaliment a Jumieka) is the legislative branch of the government of Jamaica. It consists of three elements: The Crown (represented by the Governor-General), the appointed Senate and the directly elected House of Representatives.

The Senate, the Upper House, is the direct successor of a pre-Independence body known as the "Legislative Council" and comprises 21 senators appointed by the Governor-General: thirteen on the advice of the Prime Minister and eight on the advice of the Leader of the Opposition.

The House of Representatives, the Lower House, is made up of 63 (previously 60) Members of Parliament, elected to five-year terms on a first-past-the-post basis in single-seat constituencies.

Overview

As Jamaica is a parliamentary democracy modelled after the Westminster system, most of the government's ability to make and pass laws is dependent on the Prime Minister's ability to command the confidence of the members of the House of Representatives. Though both Houses of Parliament hold political significance, the House of Representatives, of which the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition are both required to be members, holds a more powerful and prestigious role since it is the main source of legislation.

Parliament building

The Parliament meets at Gordon House at 81 Duke Street, Kingston.[1] It was built in 1960 and named in memory of Jamaican patriot George William Gordon.[2]

Construction on a new parliament building directly north of Gordon House was expected to start in early 2021.[3] However, the start of construction has been delayed until at least 2022.[4]

House of Representatives

See also: Constituencies of Jamaica

The House of Representatives is the Lower House. It is the group of elected members of parliament.

Members

Main article: 14th Parliament of Jamaica

Senate

The Senate is the Upper House. The current members are:

Jamaica Labour Party:

People's National Party:

In order to effect changes to the Constitution of Jamaica a two-thirds majority in both Houses is required. Therefore, changes to the Jamaican constitution will require consensus among Government and Opposition Senators.

Last election

Main article: 2020 Jamaican general election

PartyVotes%+/–Seats+/–
Jamaica Labour Party408,37657.07+6.9949+17
People's National Party305,95042.76–6.9514–17
Independents1,1850.17+0.0300
Total715,511100.0063
Valid votes715,51198.78
Invalid/blank votes8,8061.22
Total votes724,317100.00
Registered voters/turnout1,913,41037.85
Source: Electoral Commission of Jamaica

See also

References

  1. ^ "Contact Us". Japarliament.gov.jm. Archived from the original on 7 February 2012. Retrieved 3 January 2016.
  2. ^ "History". Japarliament.gov.jm. Retrieved 3 January 2016.
  3. ^ "Construction of New Parliament Building to Begin 2021". jis.gov.jm. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  4. ^ Henry, Balford (19 March 2021). "Construction of new Parliament building set to start next year". Jamaica Observer. Retrieved 9 June 2021.