Tunisia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)نسور قرطاج ("Eagles of Carthage")
AssociationTunisian Football Federation
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationUNAF (North Africa)
Head coachJalel Kadri[1]
CaptainYoussef Msakni
Most capsRadhi Jaïdi (105)
Top scorerIssam Jemâa (36)
Home stadiumStade Olympique Hammadi Agrebi
FIFA codeTUN
First colours
Second colours
Third colours
FIFA ranking
Current 31 Steady (20 July 2023)[2]
Highest14 (April – May 2018)
Lowest65 (July 2010)
First international
 Tunisia 4–2 Libya 
(Tunis, Tunisia; 2 June 1957)[3]
Biggest win
 Tunisia 8–1 Republic of China 
(Rome, Italy; 18 August 1960)
 Tunisia 7–0 Togo 
(Tunis, Tunisia; 7 January 2000)
 Tunisia 7–0 Malawi 
(Tunis, Tunisia; 26 March 2005)
 Tunisia 8–1 Djibouti 
(Tunis, Tunisia; 12 June 2015)
Biggest defeat
 Hungary 10–1 Tunisia 
(Budapest, Hungary; 24 July 1960)
World Cup
Appearances6 (first in 1978)
Best resultGroup stage (1978, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2018, 2022)
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances21 (first in 1962)
Best resultChampions (2004)
African Nations Championship
Appearances2 (first in 2011)
Best resultChampions (2011)
Arab Cup
Appearances3 (first in 1963)
Best resultChampions (1963)
FIFA Confederations Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2005)
Best resultGroup stage (2005)
WebsiteFTF.org.tn (in French)

The Tunisia national football team (Arabic: منتخب تونس لكرة القدم; French: Équipe de Tunisie de football) represents Tunisia in men's international association football. The team is a member of both FIFA and CAF, the Confederation of African Football. It is governed by the Tunisian Football Federation, founded in 1957. Colloquially known as the Eagles of Carthage,[4] the team's colours are red and white, and the bald eagle is its symbol. Most of Tunisia's home matches are played at the Stade Olympique de Radès in Radès since 2001.[5] Jalel Kadri has been coaching the team since 30 January 2022.[6]

Tunisia is one of the most competitive African national teams in international football, having won one African Cup of Nations, as hosts in 2004.[7] They have made six FIFA World Cups and twenty Africa Cup of Nations tournaments, and participated in four editions of the Olympic football tournaments.

History

Main article: History of the Tunisia national football team

1928–1956: early years

An unofficial Tunisian team was formed in 1928, comprising the best Tunisian players from the Tunisian league. The team's first match was on 11 March 1928, against the French B team; Tunisia lost 8–2.[8] Their next friendlies, against the same team on 23 March 1930 and 26 March 1933, also resulted in heavy defeats, 0–5 and 1–6 respectively. Tunisia had to wait until 1932 for their first match win, a 1–0 victory over French Algeria.[9]

Most of the matches that Tunisia played in the 1930s and '40s were against French teams, whether it was French Algeria, the French military team or the France B team, at the Stade Vélodrome in Tunis.

1956–78: post-independence

Stade Chedly Zouiten, the home of the Tunisian team in the 1960s.

Tunisia gained independence from France on 20 March 1956. The Tunisian Football Federation was founded on 29 March 1957 and the Tunisian team played a match with Austrian club FC Admira Wacker Mödling on 30 December of the same year and managed to win 4–1. Tunisia became affiliated with FIFA and the Confederation of African Football in 1960. The independent Tunisia played their first match against Algeria on 1 June 1957, in the midst of the Algerian War; Tunisia lost 2–1. They played their first official match at the 1957 Arab Games where they won against Libya 4–3 after scoring the first Tunisian goal in an official competition by Farzit. They also managed to get through Iraq and Lebanon before losing in the final against Syria 3–1.

In 1960, Yugoslavian Milan Kristić became the first foreign manager; the national team qualified for the 1960 Summer Olympics, their first international event after beating Malta, Morocco and Sudan; on 24 July 1960, the team experienced its biggest-ever defeat, losing 10–1 against Hungary. However, less than a month later, on 18 August, Tunisia recorded their biggest-ever win: an 8–1 thumping of Taiwan. In the Olympic Games, the team suffered three defeats: against Poland 6–1, Argentina 2–1 and Denmark 3–1.

Tunisia at the 1978 FIFA World Cup qualification against Egypt.

Frane Matošić was appointed as the second Yugoslav coach of Tunisia after Kristić led Tunisia to qualify for the Olympics. In 1962, Tunisia entered the African Cup of Nations qualifiers for the first time: the team qualified for the tournament after overcoming Morocco and Nigeria and went on to finish third after beating Uganda in the third-place match. The team won the 1963 Arab Cup, after winning against Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Kuwait.

Tunisia also qualified for the 1963 Africa Cup of Nations, and CAF decided that Tunisia would host the 1965 AFCON, making the final after beating Ethiopia 4–0 in the opening match in Stade Chedly Zouiten,[10] losing 3–2 to Ghana in extra-time of the final.[11] Despite this early success, Tunisia did not enter the Cup of Nations again until 1976, and qualify until 1978. In 1973, the team entered the Palestine Cup of Nations and won in dominant fashion, winning all six of their matches overcoming Syria, Egypt, Palestine, Yemen and Iraq, scoring 19 goals, and conceding only three.

1978: golden generation

In February 1975, after a short stint with Hungarian manager André Nagy, Abdelmajid Chetali was hired. Tunisia qualified for their FIFA World Cup debut in 1978 after a remarkable performance in the qualifiers led by a distinguished generation with Mokhtar Dhouib, Néjib Ghommidh, Raouf Ben Aziza and Tarak Dhiab. Tunisia defeated Mexico 3–1,[12] but were defeated by Poland 1–0,[13] and drew scoreless against defending champion West Germany.

1978–1994: decline

Dhiab scored Tunisia's qualification goal for the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Following their first World Cup, Tunisia experienced a decline; between 1980 and 1992, the team managed to qualify for only two tournaments – the 1982 African Cup of Nations and the 1988 Summer Olympics – in both, they were knocked out in the first round. They, however, reached the last round of the 1986 World Cup qualifiers by beating Nigeria before being defeated by Algeria. Former Cameroon manager Jean Vincent was hired but failed to qualify for the 1988 African Cup in Morocco after a defeat against Algeria. He also achieved catastrophic results in the African Games with defeats against Cameroon, Madagascar and Kenya, and was immediately sacked.

Taoufik Ben Othman, assistant manager in 1978,[14] improved Tunisia's results relatively as they qualified for the Olympic Games after surpassing Morocco and Egypt in the qualifiers. However, he was sacked days before the start of the competition after poor results in the 1988 Arab Cup and failure to win in their matches against Saudi Arabia,[15] Lebanon,[16] Egypt[17] and Iraq,[18] as well as friendlies against Malta, Finland and East Germany.

Polish manager Antoni Piechniczek was temporarily appointed and supervised the team in the first round of World Cup qualifiers 1990 and also in the finals of the Olympic Games; in the latter, Tunisia tied China 0–0[19] and Sweden 2–2[20] and suffered a defeat from West Germany 4–1.[21] Mokhtar Tlili was appointed manager, however, he still missed the African Cup in 1990 after a defeat to Senegal. Piechniczek came back but still did not qualify for the 1990 World Cup. Despite missing the 1992 African Cup, the federation renewed confidence in him because of the respectable performance he had given in the qualifiers; an early exit from the World Cup qualifiers for 1994 contributed to his dismissal after a draw with Morocco. Youssef Zouaoui replaced him; Tunisia hosted the 1994 African Cup of Nations replacing original hosts Zaire, but finished at the bottom of the group, after a 2–0 loss to Mali[22] and a draw with Zaire.[23]

1994–2002: resurgence

Henryk Kasperczak became the new manager after Tunisia hosted the 1994 African Cup of Nations. Tunisia qualified for the 1996 AFCON and finished second in their group, putting them through to the quarter-finals. Tunisia went on to beat Gabon in the quarter-finals and Zambia in the semi-finals,[24][25] to reach their first major final in 31 years, but lost to host country South Africa 2–0.[26]

Tunisia reached the quarter-finals of the 1998 African Cup of Nations in the lead of the group with a win over DR Congo,[27] Togo and a defeat from Ghana,[28][29] where they were eliminated in a penalty shootout by host country Burkina Faso.[30] The team also qualified for that year's World Cup after a 20-year absence: they again failed to advance from the group stages, losing 2–0 to England and 1–0 to Colombia,[31][32] and drawing 1–1 with Romania.[33] Kasperczak was sacked and replaced with Francesco Scoglio, who guided the team to the 2000 African Cup of Nations, where they finished in fourth place after losing to Cameroon in the semi-finals.[34]

The following year, Scoglio departed to rejoin Genoa CFC, sparking a period of severe instability. Eckhard Krautzun initially took over and guided the team to a second successive World Cup qualification, but then resigned, citing interference from the Tunisian FA with his coaching. Henri Michel replaced him, but was sacked when Tunisia crashed out of the 2002 African Cup of Nations without scoring a single goal after scoreless draws with Senegal and Zambia and a defeat from Egypt. Finally, Ammar Souayah took over in time for the 2002 World Cup; the team drew in friendlies with Norway and South Korea and were defeated by Denmark and Slovenia. In the finals, Tunisia exited the tournament in the group stage, drawing 1–1 with Belgium, losing 2–0 to Russia and co-hosts Japan,[35][36][37] prompting a search for a new manager.[38][39][40]

2002–2008: Roger Lemerre era, African domination

Tunisia-Ukraine match during the 2006 FIFA World Cup.

In September 2002, the Tunisian Football Federation announced that it was finalizing a contract with former France manager Roger Lemerre. Tunisia hosted the 2004 African Cup of Nations, winning the group.[41] They defeated Senegal in the quarter-finals,[42] and Nigeria in the semi-finals. Tunisia built a 1–0 lead after four minutes with Mehdi Nafti's concentration pushed by Francileudo Santos, before Morocco levelled. Tunisia restored their lead,[43] giving them their first African Cup of Nations title. They also won the CAF's African National Team of the Year award. Lemerre became the first manager to win two different continental tournaments, having previously won Euro 2000 with France.

As a result, Tunisia qualified for the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup in Germany, playing the hosts, Argentina and Australia. The only points they would win was a victory over Australia.[44][45][46] Before their 2006 World Cup appearance, Lemerre took the Tunisians to a training camp in Switzerland, where they played international friendlies against Swiss clubs. Tunisia would only record one draw in Germany, against Saudi Arabia, losing against Spain and Ukraine.[47]

Hatem Trabelsi announced his retirement from international football after eight years,[48][49] and Lemerre led Tunisia to the 2008 African Cup of Nations. Tunisia won their 2008 AFCON group after a draw in the opening match against Senegal 2–2, a 3–1 victory over South Africa, and a goalless draw against Angola. They then lost against Cameroon 3–2 in extra time.[50]

2008–2014: disappointments

Tunisia-Gabon match in the 2010 Africa Cup of Nations.

Portuguese Humberto Coelho was appointed as the new manager on 3 June 2008. Coelho would fail to qualify for the 2010 World Cup. Faouzi Benzarti was appointed as the new manager, and was also sacked after Tunisia were eliminated from the group stage in the 2010 Africa Cup of Nations. In June 2010, Bertrand Marchand was appointed manager for a two-year contract. After a series of horrendous results, Tunisia fell to 65th in the FIFA World Rankings, the worst in its history. Sami Trabelsi was appointed, and the team qualified for the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations, where they were eliminated in the quarter-finals after a defeat by Ghana.

In the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations, Tunisia snatched a late winner against Algeria, before a defeat by Ivory Coast, 3–0. The last match ended with a 1–1 draw against Togo. In February 2013, Nabil Maâloul replaced Sami Trabelsi; in their first two 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifications, Tunisia beat Sierra Leone 2–1 and clinched a 2–2 draw in Freetown.

On 16 June, during the fifth round of the group stage, Tunisia tied 1–1 against Equatorial Guinea. A 2–0 loss to Cape Verde on 7 September all but eliminated Tunisia; however, Tunisia advanced after FIFA disqualified Cape Verde for cheating. They would then be knocked out by Cameroon.

2014–present: resurgence and World Cup disappointment

Belgian manager Georges Leekens was appointed in early 2014; early results included a 1–1 draw against Colombia and a 1–0 win over South Korea,[51][52] both in friendly matches. Under Leekens, the team climbed from 49th to 22nd in the FIFA rankings. Tunisia qualified for the 2015 African Cup of Nations, and topped their group for the first time since 2008, winning against Zambia and drawing with Cape Verde and DR Congo.[53][54][55] They were eliminated in the quarter-finals after a defeat to host Equatorial Guinea.[56] In July 2015, Henryk Kasperczak returned as manager after 17 years. He managed to qualify the team for the 2017 African Cup, and reached the quarter-finals of the competition after beating Algeria and Zimbabwe,[57][58] before losing again in this round, this time against Burkina Faso.[59]

Tunisia–Belgium match at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.

On 27 April 2017, Nabil Maâloul returned as manager despite the disapproval of the Tunisian supporters following the failure at the 2014 World Cup qualifiers, but this time he qualified Tunisia for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia. Tunisia's qualification for the World Cup and its results in friendlies against Iran and Costa Rica,[60] led to its rise to 14th place in the FIFA World Rankings, their best ever. Before the World Cup, Tunisia drew with Turkey and Portugal,[61] in addition to a narrow defeat against Spain 1–0.[62] Despite this, in the World Cup, Tunisia were once again eliminated from the group stage. In the first match,[63] England won 2–1.[64] Belgium defeated the North Africans 5–2,[65] and in Tunisia's last game against Panama,[66] the Arab nation won 2–1.[67][68] Tunisia qualified for the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations with new manager Alain Giresse; the new manager would only record three ties, against Angola, Mali, and Mauritania to qualify for the round 16. They eventually would win against Ghana, and Madagascar 3–0 in the quarter-finals, to qualify for the semi-finals for the first time in 15 years, losing to Senegal 1–0 in extra time. In September 2021, the national team began its 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification campaign with three consecutive victories against Equatorial Guinea, Zambia,[69] and Mauritania; they would then draw Mauritania 0–0 and lose against Equatorial Guinea 1–0, to advance for the third round on the top of the group.[70][71]

Qatar hosted the 2021 FIFA Arab Cup; Tunisia started with a 5–1 win against Mauritania.[72] They then suffered an unexpected defeat to Syria,[73] before winning against the United Arab Emirates.[74] In the quarter-finals Tunisia won against Oman 2–1, and scored a 95th minute winner against Egypt in the semi-finals.[75] Tunisia faced Algeria in the final, losing 2–0.[76] The 2021 Africa Cup of Nations was postponed to early 2022; in the group stage, Tunisia began with a 1–0 defeat against Mali, with Zambian referee Janny Sikazwe ending the match in the 85th minute.[77][78] In the second match, the team achieved a 4–0 victory over Mauritania,[79] and lost against Gambia in the last group match. Tunisia defeated Nigeria in the round of 16, and were eliminated by Burkina Faso.[80][81]

In March, Tunisia qualified for their sixth World Cup, the 2022 tournament in Qatar, the first hosted by an Arab nation, after beating Mali 1–0 on aggregate, taking revenge for the earlier loss in the AFCON.[82] They then defeated Chile and Japan to win the 2022 Kirin Cup Soccer title for the first time,[83][84] and Ferjani Sassi was named the best player of the tournament while his compatriot Issam Jebali finished as the top scorer with two goals.[85] Tunisia played two pre-World Cup friendlies in France in September 2022, defeating Comoros 1−0 in Croissy-sur-Seine[86] and losing 5−1 to Brazil at the Parc des Princes in Paris.[87] With the exception of Brazil, Tunisia's relatively good forms increased confidence on the side to break the knockout stage taboo as Tunisia found themselves grouped with world champions France, European dark horse Denmark and Asian minnows Australia.[88]

In Group D, Tunisia drew Euro 2020 semi-finalists Denmark 0−0 in a rather decent display by the African side.[89] But a 0−1 loss against Australia followed, severely hampering Tunisia's odds to progress. A 1−0 victory over France courtesy of a goal from Wahbi Khazri was not enough to seal Tunisia's place in the last 16 as Australia's Mathew Leckie goal against Denmark meant the Asian representative placed second.[90][91]

Home stadium

Main article: Stade Olympique Hammadi Agrebi

Tunisia against the Netherlands at Stade Hammadi Agrebi in Radès.

From 1956 to 2001, the national stadium was Chedly Zouiten Stadium,[92] with a capacity of 18,000.[93] It hosted also the 1965 and 1994 African Cup of Nations and the 1977 FIFA U-20 World Cup before it was replaced after the construction of El Menzah Stadium (45,000) in 1967 for the 1967 Mediterranean Games. Tunisia's first match at the stadium was played on 8 September 1967 against Libya. It hosted the 1977 FIFA World Youth Championship and was completely renovated for the 1994 African Cup of Nations. It also hosted the 2004 AFCON.

In 2001, Stade 7 November was inaugurated as Tunisia's national stadium ahead of the 2001 Mediterranean Games. Located in Radès, the stadium has an all-seater capacity of 60,000.[94] The first match at the stadium was played on 7 July 2001 against between Étoile du Sahel and CS Hammam-Lif for the Tunisian Cup final. Tunisia have used the stadium for almost every major home game, including the 2004 African Cup of Nations Final. The Tunisians often host their matches at the Stade Mustapha Ben Jannet in Monastir which has a capacity of 20,000.

In addition, there are many other venues that host games, such as the Olympic Stadium of Sousse, which hosted a friendly match between Tunisia and Switzerland in November 2012 and also hosted a match in the 2012 AFCON qualification.

Rivalries

Main articles: Algeria–Tunisia football rivalry and Egypt–Tunisia football rivalry

Tunisia's main football rivals are its neighbours Algeria, Morocco, and Egypt, with which it shares close cultural and political relations.

Tunisia–Algeria match in the 2013 African Cup of Nations.

Tunisia have played 45 games against Algeria. After the independence of Algeria, a friendly match took place at the Stade Chedly Zouiten.[95] The teams also met three times in the qualifying phase of the World Cup in 1970, 1978 and 1986. The overall record slightly favours the Algerians with 16 wins, 14 draws and 14 losses. Algeria and Tunisia played three times in official competitions: twice in the Africa Cup of Nations, in 2013 and 2017,[96][97] which Tunisia won both times, and once in the FIFA Arab Cup in 2021, which Algeria won.[98]

The rivalry between Egypt and Tunisia is one of Africa's best and most exciting matches for their long continental history.[99] The two teams have met 39 times in both official and friendly matches. The overall record is slightly favourable to the Tunisians, who won 16 matches against Egypt's 12. 11 matches ended in a draw. Tunisia and Morocco have played 50 games since their independence from France in 1956.[100] Their first match was for the 1962 World Cup qualification, which took place on 30 October 1960 in Casablanca.[101] Most of the matches were played in World Cup qualification as they met in the qualifiers of 1962, 1970, 1978, 1990, 1994 and 2006.[102] They also met four times in the African Cup of Nations. Two of them ended in a draw in 1978 and 2000 and the other two matches ended up as a Tunisian win in the 2004 and 2012 AFCONs.[103]

Team image

Supporters

Tunisian fans in Moscow at the 2018 World Cup.

Fans of the Tunisian national team display the country's national flag,[104] usually with an emphasis on the red element.[105]

Kits and crest

Six companies have supplied sports uniforms to the Tunisian national team, starting in 1970, when Adidas began to adopt the Tunisian national team's uniforms for 24 years. Italy's Lotto provided Tunisia's until 1998, and Uhlsport has supplied the Tunisian team as well. From 2002 to 2011, Puma provided the Tunisian national football team kits. In 2019, the Italian company Kappa began making them.

Kit manufacturer

Period Kit supplier Ref
1956–1970 Local equipment [106]
1970–1994 Germany Adidas [107]
1994–1995 Tunisia Guidas [108]
1995–1997 Italy Kappa [109]
1998–2000 Italy Lotto [110]
2000–2001 Germany Uhlsport [111]
2002–2011 Germany Puma [112]
2012–2015 Switzerland Burrda Sport [113]
2016–2018 Germany Uhlsport [114]
2019– Italy Kappa [115]

Current participations

2023 Africa Cup of Nations qualification

Main article: 2023 Africa Cup of Nations qualification Group J

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Equatorial Guinea (Q) 5 4 0 1 8 6 +2 12 Final tournament
2  Tunisia (Q) 5 3 1 1 8 1 +7 10
3  Botswana (E) 5 1 1 3 3 6 −3 4
4  Libya (E) 5 1 0 4 1 7 −6 3
Updated to match(es) played on 17 June 2023. Source: CAF
(E) Eliminated; (Q) Qualified for the phase indicated

2026 FIFA World Cup qualification

Main article: 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification – CAF Group H

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Tunisia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Qualification for 2026 FIFA World Cup
2  Equatorial Guinea 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Possible play-off stage
3  Namibia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4  Malawi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5  Liberia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6  São Tomé and Príncipe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played: November 2023. Source: CAF

Results and fixtures

Main article: Tunisia national football team results (2020–present)

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2022

22 September Friendly Tunisia 1–0  Comoros Croissy-sur-Seine, France
16:30 CEST (UTC+2)
  • Khenissi 59'
Report Stadium: Stade Omnisports Du Chemin De Ronde
Referee: Gabriel Henry (France)
27 September Friendly Brazil  5–1 Tunisia Paris, France
20:30 CEST (UTC+2)
Report
Stadium: Parc des Princes
Attendance: 47,000
Referee: Ruddy Buquet (France)
16 November Unofficial Friendly Iran  0–2  Tunisia Doha, Qatar
16:00 UTC+3 Report
Stadium: Al Rayyan SC Training Stadium
Attendance: 0
22 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Denmark  0–0  Tunisia Al Rayyan, Qatar
16:00 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Education City Stadium
Attendance: 42,925
Referee: César Ramos (Mexico)
26 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Tunisia  0–1  Australia Al Wakrah, Qatar
13:00 UTC+3 Report
Stadium: Al Janoub Stadium
Attendance: 41,823
Referee: Daniel Siebert (Germany)
30 November 2022 FIFA World Cup Tunisia  1–0  France Al Rayyan, Qatar
18:00 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Education City Stadium
Attendance: 43,627
Referee: Matthew Conger (New Zealand)

2023

24 March 2023 AFCON qualification Tunisia 3–0  Libya Tunis, Tunisia
21:30 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Stade Hammadi Agrebi
Referee: Mustapha Ghorbal (Algeria)
28 March 2023 AFCON qualification Libya  0–1 Tunisia Benghazi, Libya
22:00 UTC+2 Report
Stadium: Martyrs of February Stadium
Referee: Amin Omar (Egypt)
17 June 2023 AFCON qualification Equatorial Guinea  1–0 Tunisia Malabo, Equatorial Guinea
16:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Estadio de Malabo
Referee: Ibrahim Kalilou Traore (Ivory Coast)
20 June Friendly Algeria  1–1 Tunisia Annaba, Algeria
20:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: 19 May 1956 Stadium
Attendance: 50,000
Referee: Abdel Aziz Mohamed Bouh (Mauritania)
7 September 2023 AFCON qualification Tunisia v  Botswana Tunis, Tunisia
--:-- UTC+1 Report Stadium: Stade Hammadi Agrebi
12 September Friendly Egypt  v Tunisia Cairo, Egypt
--:-- UTC+3 Report
17 October 2023 Kirin Challenge Cup Japan  v Tunisia Kobe, Japan
19:10 UTC+9 Report Stadium: Noevir Stadium Kobe
November 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification v
--:-- 
November 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification v
--:-- 

Current staff

Main article: List of Tunisia national football team managers

Position Name
Head Coach Tunisia Jalel Kadri
Assistant Coaches Tunisia Ali Boumnijel
Tunisia Selim Benachour
Goalkeeping Coach Tunisia Chedly Mabrouki
Sporting Director Tunisia Slim Ben Othman
Team Administrator Tunisia Hussein Jenayah
Physiotherapists Tunisia Akram Hbiri
Tunisia Majdi Turki
Tunisia Fethi Naoui
Tunisia Mohamed Gharbi
Fitness Coaches Tunisia Aymen Jdidi
Tunisia Hichem Ghozia
Tunisia Mohamed Tounsi
Team Doctor Tunisia Souheil Chemli
Osteopath Tunisia Tarek Chamseddine
Nutritionist Tunisia Anis Yacoubi
Video Analyst Tunisia Walid Ben Tamansourt
Team Manager Tunisia Mohamed Gharbi
Media Officers Tunisia Kais Reguez
Tunisia Jouda Khenissi
Security Officers Tunisia Mohamed Dellagi
Tunisia Mahmoud Trabelsi

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for the 2023 Africa Cup of Nations qualification fixture against Equatorial Guinea on 17 June and the friendly game against Algeria 20 June 2023.[116]

Information correct as of 20 June 2023, after the match against Algeria.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Mouez Hassen (1995-03-05) 5 March 1995 (age 28) 20 0 Tunisia Club Africain
16 1GK Aymen Dahmen (1997-01-28) 28 January 1997 (age 26) 12 0 Saudi Arabia Al-Hazem
22 1GK Bechir Ben Saïd (1992-11-29) 29 November 1992 (age 30) 10 0 Tunisia Union Monastirienne
1GK Dries Arfaoui (2004-11-23) 23 November 2004 (age 18) 0 0 Belgium Deinze

2 2DF Yan Valery (1999-02-22) 22 February 1999 (age 24) 3 0 France Angers
3 2DF Montassar Talbi (captain) (1998-05-26) 26 May 1998 (age 25) 29 2 France Lorient
4 2DF Yassine Meriah (1993-07-02) 2 July 1993 (age 30) 68 3 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
5 2DF Oussama Haddadi (1992-01-28) 28 January 1992 (age 31) 29 0 Germany Greuther Fürth
6 2DF Alaa Ghram (2001-07-24) 24 July 2001 (age 22) 1 0 Tunisia Club Sfaxien
12 2DF Mortadha Ben Ouanes (1994-07-02) 2 July 1994 (age 29) 6 0 Turkey Kasımpaşa
20 2DF Mohamed Dräger (1996-06-25) 25 June 1996 (age 27) 38 3 England Nottingham Forest
21 2DF Wajdi Kechrida (1995-11-05) 5 November 1995 (age 27) 26 0 Greece Atromitos
24 2DF Ali Abdi (1993-12-20) 20 December 1993 (age 29) 15 2 France Caen

8 3MF Anis Ben Slimane (2001-03-16) 16 March 2001 (age 22) 30 4 England Sheffield United
10 3MF Hannibal Mejbri (2003-01-21) 21 January 2003 (age 20) 24 0 England Manchester United
13 3MF Mohamed Wael Derbali (2003-06-18) 18 June 2003 (age 20) 1 0 Tunisia Olympique Béja
14 3MF Aïssa Laïdouni (1996-12-13) 13 December 1996 (age 26) 32 1 Germany Union Berlin
15 3MF Mohamed Ali Ben Romdhane (1999-09-06) 6 September 1999 (age 23) 28 1 Hungary Ferencváros
17 3MF Haykeul Chikhaoui (1996-09-04) 4 September 1996 (age 26) 1 0 United Arab Emirates Ajman
23 3MF Oussama Abid (2002-08-10) 10 August 2002 (age 20) 0 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel

7 4FW Elias Achouri (1999-02-10) 10 February 1999 (age 24) 5 0 Denmark Copenhagen
9 4FW Issam Jebali (1991-12-25) 25 December 1991 (age 31) 15 2 Japan Gamba Osaka
11 4FW Oussama Bouguerra (1998-10-17) 17 October 1998 (age 24) 1 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
18 4FW Mohamed Dhaoui (2003-05-14) 14 May 2003 (age 20) 2 0 Egypt Al Ahly
19 4FW Haythem Jouini (1993-05-07) 7 May 1993 (age 30) 3 2 Tunisia Stade Tunisien
28 4FW Hamdi Labidi (2002-06-09) 9 June 2002 (age 21) 2 0 Tunisia Club Africain

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up within the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Moez Ben Cherifia (1991-06-24) 24 June 1991 (age 32) 22 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
GK Aymen Mathlouthi (1984-09-14) 14 September 1984 (age 38) 73 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel 2022 FIFA World Cup
GK Mohamed Sedki Debchi (1999-10-28) 28 October 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis v.  Brazil, 27 September 2022

DF Ali Maâloul (1990-01-01) 1 January 1990 (age 33) 85 3 Egypt Al Ahly v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
DF Nader Ghandri (1995-02-18) 18 February 1995 (age 28) 10 0 United Arab Emirates Ajman v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
DF Bilel Ifa (1990-03-09) 9 March 1990 (age 33) 37 0 Kuwait Kuwait SC 2022 FIFA World Cup
DF Hamza Mathlouthi (1992-07-25) 25 July 1992 (age 31) 38 1 Egypt Zamalek v.  Brazil, 27 September 2022
DF Omar Rekik (2001-12-20) 20 December 2001 (age 21) 3 0 England Arsenal v.  Brazil, 27 September 2022
DF Rami Kaib (1997-05-08) 8 May 1997 (age 26) 2 0 Sweden Djurgårdens IF v.  Brazil, 27 September 2022

MF Ellyes Skhiri (1995-05-10) 10 May 1995 (age 28) 54 3 Germany Eintracht Frankfurt v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
MF Ghailene Chaalali (1994-02-28) 28 February 1994 (age 29) 31 1 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis v.  Libya, 28 March 2023INJ
MF Firas Ben Larbi (1996-05-27) 27 May 1996 (age 27) 11 2 United Arab Emirates Sharjah v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
MF Chaïm El Djebali (2004-02-07) 7 February 2004 (age 19) 1 0 France Lyon B v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
MF Ferjani Sassi (1992-03-18) 18 March 1992 (age 31) 78 6 Qatar Al-Gharafa 2022 FIFA World Cup
MF Saîf-Eddine Khaoui (1995-04-27) 27 April 1995 (age 28) 28 4 United Arab Emirates Khor Fakkan v.  Brazil, 27 September 2022

FW Youssef Msakni (1990-10-28) 28 October 1990 (age 32) 91 18 Qatar Al Arabi v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
FW Seifeddine Jaziri (1993-02-12) 12 February 1993 (age 30) 31 10 Egypt Zamalek v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
FW Amor Layouni (1992-10-03) 3 October 1992 (age 30) 5 1 Sweden Häcken v.  Libya, 28 March 2023
FW Wahbi Khazri (1991-02-08) 8 February 1991 (age 32) 74 25 France Montpellier 2022 FIFA World CupRET
FW Naïm Sliti (1992-07-27) 27 July 1992 (age 31) 69 14 Qatar Al Ahli Doha 2022 FIFA World Cup
FW Taha Yassine Khenissi (1992-01-06) 6 January 1992 (age 31) 48 9 Kuwait Kuwait SC 2022 FIFA World Cup
FW Sayfallah Ltaief (2000-04-22) 22 April 2000 (age 23) 1 0 Switzerland Winterthur v.  Brazil, 27 September 2022

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Player has retired from international football.
SUS Player is serving a suspension.
WD Player withdrew for personal reasons.

Player records

Main article: Tunisia national football team records and statistics

As of 28 March 2023
Players in bold are still active with Tunisia.

Most appearances

Main article: List of Tunisia international footballers

Radhi Jaïdi is the most capped player in the history of Tunisia with 105 caps.
Rank Player Caps Goals Position Career
1 Radhi Jaïdi 105 7 DF 1996–2009
2 Chokri El Ouaer 97 0 GK 1990–2002
3 Khaled Badra 96 10 DF 1995–2006
4 Khaled Ben Yahia[a] 95 5 DF 1979–1993
Kaies Ghodhbane 95 6 MF 1995–2006
6 Riadh Bouazizi 92 3 MF 1995–2006
7 Youssef Msakni 91 18 FW 2010–present
8 Tarak Dhiab[a] 89 12 FW 1974–1990
9 Sadok Sassi[a] 87 0 GK 1963–1978
10 Mohamed Ali Mahjoubi[a] 86 17 MF 1985–1995

Top goalscorers

Main article: List of leading goalscorers for the Tunisia national football team

Wahbi Khazri is second on the list of goalscorers in Tunisian history with 25 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Issam Jemâa (list) 36 84 0.43 2005–2014
2 Wahbi Khazri 25 74 0.34 2013–2022
3 Francileudo Santos 22 41 0.51 2004–2008
4 Adel Sellimi 20 80 0.25 1990–2002
5 Faouzi Rouissi 18 42 0.43 1989–2001
Youssef Msakni 18 91 0.2 2010–present
7 Mohamed Ali Mahjoubi 17 86 0.2 1985–1995
8 Mohamed Salah Jedidi 15 32 0.47 1962–1965
9 Hassen Gabsi 14 50 0.28 1997–2002
Zied Jaziri 14 63 0.22 1999–2007
Naïm Sliti 14 71 0.2 2016–present
  1. ^ a b c d Matches in the Olympic Games and against Amateur sides are not considered full 'A' internationals by FIFA

Competitive record

Overview
Event 1st place 2nd place 3rd place
Africa Cup of Nations 1 2 1
African Nations Championship 1 0 0
FIFA Arab Cup 1 1 0
Total 3 3 1

FIFA World Cup

Main article: Tunisia at the FIFA World Cup

Tunisia have appeared in the finals of the FIFA World Cup on six occasions, the first in 1978 where they finished ninth of 16. Between 1998 and 2006 they qualified for three straight World Cups, and wouldn't qualify again until 2018.[117] However, Tunisia have never advanced from the group stage.

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA Ref.
Uruguay 1930 Part of  France Part of  France [118]
Italy 1934 [119]
France 1938 [120]
Brazil 1950 [121]
Switzerland 1954 [122]
Sweden 1958 Did not enter Did not enter [123]
Chile 1962 Did not qualify 3 1 1 1 4 4 [124]
England 1966 Withdrew Withdrew [125]
Mexico 1970 Did not qualify 5 1 4 0 4 3 [126]
West Germany 1974 4 1 1 2 5 5 [127]
Argentina 1978 Group stage 9th 3 1 1 1 3 2 Squad 10 4 4 2 15 9 [128]
Spain 1982 Did not qualify 2 1 0 1 2 2 [129]
Mexico 1986 8 4 0 4 11 9 [130]
Italy 1990 10 4 1 5 10 11 [131]
United States 1994 6 3 3 0 14 2 [132]
France 1998 Group stage 26th 3 0 1 2 1 4 Squad 8 7 1 0 15 2 [133]
South Korea Japan 2002 Group stage 29th 3 0 1 2 1 5 Squad 10 8 2 0 28 5 [134]
Germany 2006 Group stage 24th 3 0 1 2 3 6 Squad 10 6 3 1 25 9 [135]
South Africa 2010 Did not qualify 12 7 3 2 18 7 [136]
Brazil 2014 8 4 3 1 14 10 [137]
Russia 2018 Group stage 24th 3 1 0 2 5 8 Squad 8 6 2 0 15 6 [138]
Qatar 2022 Group stage 21st 3 1 1 1 1 1 Squad 8 5 2 1 12 2 [139]
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Group stage 6/22 18 3 5 10 14 26 112 62 30 20 192 86

Africa Cup of Nations

See also: Tunisia at the Africa Cup of Nations

Tunisia have participated in the African Cup of Nations 21 times and holds the record for the number of consecutive participations with 16 between 1994 and 2023. In 1965, Tunisia hosted the competition, as they reached the final and lost the title to Ghana 2–3 after extra time.[140] In 1996, the team reached the final for the second time, but was defeated by hosts South Africa 0–2.[141] They didn't win it all until 2004.[142]

Africa Cup of Nations record Africa Cup of Nations qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA Ref
Sudan 1957 Not affiliated to CAF Not affiliated to CAF [143]
United Arab Republic 1959 [144]
Ethiopia 1962 Third place 3rd 2 1 0 1 5 4 Squad 4 3 0 1 7 2 [145]
Ghana 1963 Group stage 5th 2 0 1 1 3 5 Squad 2 1 0 1 6 5 [146]
Tunisia 1965 Runners-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 6 3 Squad Qualified as hosts [147]
Ethiopia 1968 Did not qualify 4 1 1 2 5 5 [148]
Sudan 1970 Did not enter Did not enter [149]
Cameroon 1972 [150]
Egypt 1974 [151]
Ethiopia 1976 Did not qualify 6 3 1 2 8 7 [152]
Ghana 1978 Fourth place 4th 5 1 3 1 5 4 Squad 4 2 1 1 10 7 [153]
Nigeria 1980 Banned Banned [154]
Libya 1982 Group stage 7th 3 0 1 2 1 4 Squad 2 1 1 0 1 0 [155]
Ivory Coast 1984 Did not qualify 4 2 1 1 6 1 [156]
Egypt 1986 2 1 0 1 1 2 [157]
Morocco 1988 2 0 1 1 1 2 [158]
Algeria 1990 2 0 0 2 0 4 [159]
Senegal 1992 6 3 3 0 10 5 [160]
Tunisia 1994 Group stage 9th 2 0 1 1 1 3 Squad Qualified as hosts [161]
South Africa 1996 Runners-up 2nd 6 2 2 2 10 9 Squad 8 3 4 1 7 2 [162]
Burkina Faso 1998 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 6 5 Squad 3 2 0 1 3 1 [163]
Ghana Nigeria 2000 Fourth place 4th 6 2 2 2 6 9 Squad 6 5 0 1 13 3 [164]
Mali 2002 Group stage 11th 3 0 2 1 0 1 Squad 6 2 2 2 9 7 [165]
Tunisia 2004 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 10 4 Squad Qualified as hosts [166]
Egypt 2006 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 1 1 7 5 Squad 10 6 3 1 25 9 [167]
Ghana 2008 Quarter-finals 5th 4 1 2 1 7 6 Squad 6 4 1 1 12 3 [168]
Angola 2010 Group stage 12th 3 0 3 0 3 3 Squad 12 7 3 2 18 7 [169]
Gabon Equatorial Guinea 2012 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 5 5 Squad 8 4 2 2 14 6 [170]
South Africa 2013 Group stage 12th 3 1 1 1 2 4 Squad 2 0 2 0 2 2 [171]
Equatorial Guinea 2015 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 2 1 5 5 Squad 6 4 2 0 6 2 [172]
Gabon 2017 Quarter-finals 8th 4 2 0 2 6 7 Squad 6 4 1 1 16 3 [173]
Egypt 2019 Fourth place 4th 7 1 4 2 6 5 Squad 6 4 1 1 16 3 [174]
Cameroon 2021 Quarter-finals 8th 5 2 0 3 5 3 Squad 6 5 1 0 14 5 [175]
Ivory Coast 2023 Qualified 5 3 1 1 8 1
2025 To be determined To be determined
Total 1 Title 21/34 80 25 29 26 99 94 126 70 31 25 208 92

FIFA Confederations Cup

Main article: Tunisia at the FIFA Confederations Cup

Tunisia qualified for the FIFA Confederations Cup on one occasion, a sole appearance in 2005, after winning the 2004 AFCON. They only managed to win against Australia 2–0.

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Ref
Saudi Arabia 1992 Did not qualify
Saudi Arabia 1995
Saudi Arabia 1997
Mexico 1999
South Korea Japan 2001
France 2003
Germany 2005 Group stage 6th 3 1 0 2 3 5 Squad [176]
South Africa 2009 Did not qualify
Brazil 2013
Russia 2017
Total Group stage 1/10 3 1 0 2 3 5

African Nations Championship

Main article: Tunisia at the African Nations Championship

Tunisia have participated in two editions of the African Nations Championship, winning it in 2011 and reaching the quarter-finals in 2016.

African Nations Championship
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
Ivory Coast 2009 Did not qualify
Sudan 2011 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 11 3 Squad
South Africa 2014 Did not qualify
Rwanda 2016 Quarter–finals 8th 4 1 2 1 9 5 Squad
Morocco 2018 Did not compete
Cameroon 2020 Withdrew after qualifying[note 1]
Algeria 2022 Did not enter
Total Champions 2/7 10 5 4 1 20 8

FIFA Arab Cup

Main article: Tunisia at the FIFA Arab Cup

In 1963 Tunisia won the first edition of the Arab Nations Cup, played only in a group stage. Tunisia won all four matches and finished at the top. They exited in the group stage in 1988.

The 2021 FIFA Arab Cup was the first version of the tournament under FIFA, with Tunisia reaching the final finishing behind Algeria.

FIFA Arab Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Ref
Lebanon 1963 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 11 1 Squad [178]
Kuwait 1964 Did not enter
Iraq 1966
Saudi Arabia 1985
Jordan 1988 Group stage 7th 4 0 3 1 3 4 Squad [179]
Syria 1992 Did not enter
Qatar 1998
Kuwait 2002
Saudi Arabia 2012
Qatar 2021 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 0 2 9 6 Squad [180]
Total 1 Title 3/10 14 8 3 3 23 11

Mediterranean Games

Tunisia participated in the football tournament in the Mediterranean Games 12 times,[181] first in 1963 in Naples, Italy. Tunisia reached the final twice, in the 1971 edition in Izmir, Turkey and in 2001 in Tunis.

Mediterranean Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Ref
Egypt 1951 Part of  France
Spain 1955 Did not enter
Lebanon 1959
Italy 1963 Group stage 6th 3 1 0 2 3 4 [182]
Tunisia 1967 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 4 3 [183]
Turkey 1971 Silver medal 2nd 4 2 1 1 3 2 [184]
Algeria 1975 Bronze medal 3rd 5 1 3 1 5 5 [185]
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1979 Group stage 7th 3 0 1 2 2 4 [186]
Morocco 1983 Group stage 7th 2 1 0 1 4 5 [187]
Syria 1987 Did not enter
Greece 1991 Group stage 7th 2 1 0 1 1 5 [188]
France 1993 Group stage 7th 3 1 0 2 2 5 [189]
Italy 1997 Did not enter
Tunisia 2001 Gold medal 1st 4 3 0 1 7 1 [190]
Spain 2005 Quarter-finals 7th 3 0 3 0 4 4 [191]
Italy 2009 Group stage 7th 4 2 1 1 6 5 [192]
Turkey 2013 Bronze medal 3rd 5 3 1 1 10 5 [193]
Spain 2018 Did not enter
Algeria 2022
Total 1 Title 1/12 39 15 10 14 49 46

Minor Tournaments

Other records

Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Ref
Libya 1962 Tripoli Fair Tournament Third place 3rd 3 1 0 2 6 9
Senegal 1963 Friendship Games Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 0 4 9 [201]
Libya 1965 Tripoli Fair Tournament Champions 1st 3 2 1 0 4 2 [202]
Libya 1966 Tripoli Fair Tournament Fourth place 4th 3 0 1 2 0 3 [203]
Libya 1973 Palestine Cup of Nations Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 19 3 [204]
Iran 1974 Iran International Tournament Group stage 6th 2 0 1 1 0 2 [205]
Syria 1974 Kuneitra Cup Third place 3rd 7 4 0 3 10 9 [206]
Tunisia 1975 Palestine Cup of Nations Group stage 5th 2 1 1 0 4 1 [207]
Ivory Coast 1984–85 Friendship Games Third place 3rd 2 1 0 2 2 6 [208]
Malta 1988 Malta International Tournament Fourth place 4th 3 0 0 3 1 10 [209]
Tunisia 7 November Cup 1991 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 11 3 [210]
Tunisia 7 November Cup 1993 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 6 1 [211]
Malta 1994 Malta International Tournament Third place 3 3 0 2 1 2 5 [212]
Tunisia 7 November Cup 1995 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 4 1 [213]
Tunisia 1997 LG Cup Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 5 1 [214]
Tunisia 2003 Tunis Four Nations Tournament Champions 1st 2 1 1 0 3 2 [215]
Tunisia 2006 LG Cup Runners-up 2nd 2 1 1 0 3 0 [216]
Spain 2011 Catalonia International Trophy Champions 1st 1 0 1 0 0 0 [217]
Japan 2015 Kirin Challenge Cup Runners-up 2nd 1 0 0 1 0 2 [218]
Spain 2016 Catalonia International Trophy Champions 1st 1 0 1 0 3 3 [219]
Japan 2022 Kirin Cup Soccer Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 5 0 [220]
Japan 2023 Kirin Challenge Cup To be determined
Total 10 Titles 1st 60 33 12 17 96 89

Head-to-head record

The list shown below shows the Tunisia national football team all−time international record against opposing nations.

Key
  Positive balance (more wins than losses)
  Neutral balance (as many wins as losses)
  Negative balance (more losses than wins)
Tunisia national football team head-to-head records
Against Pld W D L GF GA GD Confederation
 Algeria 48 14 16 18 40 50 −10 CAF
 Angola 7 3 4 0 15 5 +10 CAF
 Argentina 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CONMEBOL
 Australia 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 AFC
 Austria 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3 UEFA
 Bahrain 2 1 0 1 3 1 +2 AFC
 Belarus 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 UEFA
 Belgium 4 1 1 2 5 8 −3 UEFA
 Benin 9 6 3 0 24 6 +18 CAF
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
 Botswana 7 3 2 2 9 5 +4 CAF
 Brazil 2 0 0 2 2 9 −7 CONMEBOL
 Bulgaria 2 1 1 0 6 3 +3 UEFA
 Burkina Faso 7 1 3 3 7 8 −1 CAF
 Burundi 3 3 0 0 5 2 +3 CAF
 Cameroon 18 2 7 9 18 29 −11 CAF
 Canada 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 CONCACAF
 Cape Verde 3 2[note 2] 1 0 5 2 +3 CAF
 Central African Republic 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 CAF
 Chad 4 3 1 0 10 2 +8 CAF
 Chile 2 1 0 1 4 3 +1 CONMEBOL
 China 4 1 2 1 3 3 0 AFC
 Chinese Taipei 1 1 0 0 8 1 +7 AFC
 Comoros 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CAF
 Colombia 2 0 1 1 1 2 −1 CONMEBOL
 Congo 9 6 2 1 17 6 +11 CAF
 Costa Rica 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CONCACAF
 Croatia 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
 Denmark 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3 UEFA
 Djibouti 2 2 0 0 11 1 +10 CAF
 DR Congo[a] 14 7 4 3 25 13 +12 CAF
 East Germany 5 1 0 4 1 11 −10 UEFA
 Egypt 40 17 10 13 44 37 +7 CAF
 England 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3 UEFA
 Equatorial Guinea 9 5 1 3 15 7 +8 CAF
 Ethiopia 8 4 2 2 17 11 +6 CAF
 Finland 3 0 1 2 2 6 −4 UEFA
 France 5 1 2 2 4 7 −3 UEFA
 Gabon 11 4 6 1 21 12 +9 CAF
 Gambia 2 0 0 2 1 3 −2 CAF
 Georgia 2 0 1 1 1 3 −2 UEFA
 Germany[b] 3 0 2 1 1 4 −3 UEFA
 Ghana 18[note 3] 4 5 9 20 27 −7 CAF
 Guinea 20 9 4 7 31 19 +12 CAF
 Guinea-Bissau 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 CAF
 Hungary 1 0 0 1 1 10 −9 UEFA
 Iceland 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 UEFA
 India 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 AFC
 Iran 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 AFC
 Iraq 11 7 3 1 19 10 +9 AFC
 Republic of Ireland 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 UEFA
 Italy 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 UEFA
 Ivory Coast 19 6 6 7 27 29 −2 CAF
 Japan 5 1 0 4 3 6 −3 AFC
 Jordan 3 2 1 0 12 3 +9 AFC
 Kenya 7 5 1 1 10 3 +7 CAF
 Kuwait 4 3 0 1 8 4 +4 AFC
 Latvia 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 UEFA
 Lebanon 5 3 1 1 9 5 +4 AFC
 Liberia 10 5 2 3 17 9 +8 CAF
 Libya 29 19 3 7 54 33 +21 CAF
 Madagascar 5 4 0 1 8 4 +4 CAF
 Malawi 7 2 3 2 16 8 +8 CAF
 Mali 14 7 2 5 14 10 +4 CAF
 Malta 12 4 4 4 13 9 +4 UEFA
 Mauritania 15 11 4 0 29 5 +24 CAF
 Mauritius 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2 CAF
 Mexico 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 CONCACAF
 Morocco 50 9 28 13 46 53 −7 CAF
 Mozambique 3 1 1 1 3 2 +1 CAF
 Namibia 3 3 0 0 8 1 +7 CAF
 Netherlands 3 0 2 1 3 7 −4 UEFA
 Niger 4 4 0 0 9 4 +5 CAF
 Nigeria 20 7 7 6 25 19 +5 CAF
 Norway 2 0 1 1 1 3 −2 UEFA
 Oman 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 AFC
 Palestine 2 1 1 0 7 3 +4 AFC
 Panama 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 CONCACAF
 Peru 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CONMEBOL
 Poland 4 1 0 3 2 9 −7 UEFA
 Portugal 2 0 2 0 3 3 0 UEFA
 Qatar 3 1 0 2 5 3 +2 AFC
 Romania 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 UEFA
 Russia[c] 2 0 0 2 0 5 −5 UEFA
 Rwanda 6 6 0 0 18 3 +15 CAF
 Saudi Arabia 7 3 2 2 7 6 +1 AFC
 Senegal 21 9 7 5 22 13 +9 CAF
 Serbia[d] 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 UEFA
 Seychelles 4 4 0 0 14 0 +14 CAF
 Sierra Leone 7 3 3 1 10 6 +4 CAF
 Slovenia 2 0 1 1 2 3 −1 UEFA
 Somalia 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 CAF
 South Africa 6 3 1 2 9 7 +2 CAF
 South Korea 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 AFC
 Spain 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 UEFA
 Sudan 11 8 0 3 28 11 +17 CAF
 Sweden 4 1 1 2 2 3 −1 UEFA
 Switzerland 3 0 1 2 2 4 −2 UEFA
 Eswatini 2 2 0 0 6 0 +6 CAF
 Syria 11 5 1 5 16 14 +2 AFC
 Togo 10 7 3 0 19 4 +15 CAF
 Turkey 6 0 5 1 4 7 −3 UEFA
 Uganda 5 5 0 0 16 1 +15 CAF
 Ukraine 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 UEFA
 United Arab Emirates 5 5 0 0 10 1 +9 AFC
 United States 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CONCACAF
 Uruguay 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CONMEBOL
 Wales 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 UEFA
 Yugoslavia 5 1 0 4 3 21 −18 UEFA
 Zambia 14 9 2 3 24 13 +11 CAF
 Zimbabwe 2 1 1 0 5 3 +2 CAF
Total 711 303 195 213 980 706 +274
Last match updated was against  Algeria Algeria on 20 June 2023.
  1. ^ Includes matches against  Zaire
  2. ^ Includes matches against  West Germany.
  3. ^ Includes matches against  Soviet Union.
  4. ^ Includes matches against  Serbia and Montenegro
Map of teams played against Tunisia by number of matches:

FIFA rankings

Tunisia's FIFA rankings have ranged from 65 in July 2010, to 14 in April 2018.

Rankings by year

Below is a chart of Tunisia's FIFA ranking since 1993.[223]

Tunisia's FIFA world rankings
Rank Year Statistics Best Worst
Games Wins Draws Loses Rank Move Rank Move
32 1993 10 6 3 1 31 Increase 7 (August) 36 Decrease 3 (September)
30 1994 10 3 5 2 27 Increase 4 (September) 33 Decrease 3 (October)
22 1995 14 7 3 4 21 Increase 6 (February) 27 Decrease 4 (August)
23 1996 14 7 2 5 21 Increase 6 (February) 31 Decrease 9 (June)
23 1997 14 9 2 3 20 Increase 7 (August) 29 Decrease 4 (June)
21 1998 17 7 4 6 19 Increase 6 (November) 26 Decrease 4 (July)
31 1999 10 7 1 2 26 Increase 4 (November) 33 Decrease 7 (June)
26 2000 17 8 7 2 25 Increase 3 (June) 28 Decrease 1 (September)
28 2001 12 8 2 2 22 Increase 7 (July) 32 Decrease 5 (April)
41 2002 14 0 8 6 28 Increase 0 (June) 41 Decrease 5 (July)
45 2003 9 5 3 1 40 Increase 3 (April) 46 Decrease 3 (October)
35 2004 16 8 4 4 31 Increase 14 (February) 45 Decrease 2 (April)
28 2005 12 8 2 2 23 Increase 8 (September) 40 Decrease 4 (October)
32 2006 16 7 4 5 21 Increase 5 (February) 32 Decrease 10 (July)
47 2007 9 5 3 1 32 Increase 5 (July) 47 Decrease 13 (February)
46 2008 16 7 5 4 44 Increase 3 (April) 56 Decrease 7 (February)
53 2009 10 4 4 2 45 Increase 2 (July) 54 Decrease 8 (February)
45 2010 11 3 5 3 44 Increase 11 (October) 65 Decrease 10 (July)
59 2011 8 4 2 2 44 Increase 3 (March) 61 Decrease 15 (April)
45 2012 16 8 4 4 41 Increase 10 (June) 59 Decrease 4 (October)
48 2013 15 4 7 4 41 Increase 11 (February) 53 Decrease 8 (June)
22 2014 9 5 3 1 22 Increase 11 (September) 49 Decrease 5 (April)
40 2015 15 5 5 5 22 Increase 2 (June) 41 Decrease 5 (April)
35 2016 11 6 4 1 34 Increase 4 (October) 48 Decrease 8 (February)
27 2017 13 6 2 5 27 Increase 7 (July) 42 Decrease 5 (April)
24 2018 8 3 2 3 14 Increase 9 (April) 24 Decrease 7 (June)
27 2019 17 8 5 4 25 Increase 3 (June) 28 Decrease 4 (July)
26 2020 4 2 2 0 26 Increase 1 (September) 27 Steady 0 (December)
30 2021 17 12 1 4 25 Increase 3 (December) 30 Decrease 4 (November)

Honours

Main article: Tunisia national football team honours

Throughout its history, the Tunisian national team has won four official titles, the most important of which remains the 2004 Africa Cup of Nations and the 2011 African Nations Championship.[224][225] It also won the gold medal at the 2001 Mediterranean Games and 1963 Arab Cup.[226][227] The team has also won ten friendly titles, including international friendly tournaments such as 1973 Palestine Cup of Nations,[228] Catalonia International Trophy in 2011 and 2016, 7th November Cup three times (1991, 1993 and 1995),[229] 2003 Tunis Four Nations Tournament,[230] 1997 LG Cup and the 2022 Kirin Cup Soccer.[231][232]

Awards

African National Team of the Year

See also

Other football codes

Notes

  1. ^ Tunisia qualified against Libya after winning two matches in the qualifiers, back 1–0 and 1–2, and due to the delay in the start of the session from January to April, the candidacy was withdrawn from the Tunisian Football Federation on 20 December 2019 due to the pressure of the calendar.[177]
  2. ^ FIFA awarded Tunisia a 3–0 win as a result of Cape Verde fielding the player Fernando Varela, who had been sent off in the match against Equatorial Guinea on 24 March 2013. As a result of his sending off for unsporting conduct towards a match official, Varela had been given a four match suspension and would miss the rest of the qualifying campaign plus one further FIFA game. Varela did not participate in the games against Equatorial Guinea on 8 June 2013 or the game against Sierra Leone on 16 June 2013. Complicating matters, Varela's red card against Equatorial Guinea was removed from the FIFA.com website.[221] The match originally ended 2–0 to Cape Verde.[222]
  3. ^ The two teams play on January 18, 2000 a training match, three halves of 35 minutes, won by Ghana 2–0 but which can not be considered a real international match.

References

  1. ^ "Tunisia appoint Tarek Souissi as new coach after dismissing Mondher Kebaier". 31 January 2022.
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 20 July 2023. Retrieved 20 July 2023.
  3. ^ "Liste des matchs internationaux de la Tunisie". RSSSF.com (in French). Retrieved 21 August 2015..
  4. ^ Football, CAF-Confedération Africaine du. ""Carthage Eagles" home glory". CAFOnline.com. Retrieved 19 April 2022.
  5. ^ "Stade de Rades - Tunis - The Stadium Guide" (in Dutch). Retrieved 19 April 2022.
  6. ^ "Tunisia appoint Jalel Kadri as new coach after dismissing Mondher Kebaier". Sporty Africa. 31 January 2022. Retrieved 19 April 2022.
  7. ^ "Tunisia win Cup of Nations". 14 February 2004. Retrieved 19 April 2022.
  8. ^ texte, Parti socialiste SFIO (France) Auteur du; texte, Parti socialiste (France) Fédération (Paris) Auteur du (12 March 1928). "Le Populaire: journal-revue hebdomadaire de propagande socialiste et internationaliste ["puis" socialiste-internationaliste]". Gallica. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  9. ^ "Tunisia v Algeria, 13 November 1932". 11 v 11. 2 May 2022.
  10. ^ "Tunisia - Ethiopia 4:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  11. ^ "Ghana - Tunisia 3:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  12. ^ "Tunisia - Mexico 3:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 23 April 2022.
  13. ^ "Poland - Tunisia 1:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 23 April 2022.
  14. ^ "Olympedia – Taoufik Ben Othman". www.olympedia.org. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  15. ^ "Saudi Arabia v Tunisia, 11 July 1988". 11v11.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  16. ^ "Tunisia v Lebanon, 17 July 1988". 11v11.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  17. ^ "Egypt v Tunisia, 13 July 1988". 11v11.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  18. ^ "Iraq v Tunisia, 09 July 1988". 11v11.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  19. ^ "Tunisia - China 0:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  20. ^ "Sweden - Tunisia 2:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  21. ^ "Tunisia - Germany 1:4". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  22. ^ "Tunisia - Mali 0:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  23. ^ "Tunisia - D.R. Congo 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  24. ^ "Gabon - Tunisia 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  25. ^ "Zambia - Tunisia 2:4". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  26. ^ "South Africa - Tunisia 2:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  27. ^ "Tunisia - D.R. Congo 2:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  28. ^ "Tunisia - Togo 3:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  29. ^ "Ghana - Tunisia 2:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  30. ^ "Tunisia - Burkina Faso 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  31. ^ "England - Tunisia 2:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  32. ^ "Colombia - Tunisia 1:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  33. ^ "Romania - Tunisia 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  34. ^ "Cameroon - Tunisia 3:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  35. ^ "Tunisia - Belgium 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  36. ^ "Russia - Tunisia 2:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  37. ^ "Tunisia - Japan 0:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  38. ^ MATIN, LE. "La Tunisie se prépare à la CAN 2004". Le Matin (in French). Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  39. ^ "Coupe d'afrique des nations de Football en Tunisie CAN 2004". coupedafrique.winoo.com. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  40. ^ "CAN 2004: c'est parti". L'Obs (in French). 26 January 2004. Retrieved 17 August 2022.
  41. ^ "Tunisia - Guinea 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  42. ^ "Tunisia - Senegal 1:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  43. ^ "Tunisia - Morocco 2:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  44. ^ "Argentina - Tunisia 2:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  45. ^ "Tunisia - Germany 0:3". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  46. ^ "Australia - Tunisia 0:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  47. ^ "Ukraine - Tunisia 1:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  48. ^ "Hatem Trabelsi | National Football Teams". 21 February 2018. Archived from the original on 21 February 2018. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  49. ^ "FIFA Tournaments - Players & Coaches - Hatem TRABELSI". 20 May 2018. Archived from the original on 20 May 2018. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  50. ^ "Tunisia - Cameroon 2:3". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  51. ^ "Colombia - Tunisia 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  52. ^ "South Korea - Tunisia 0:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  53. ^ "Zambia - Tunisia 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  54. ^ "Tunisia - Cape Verde 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  55. ^ "D.R. Congo - Tunisia 1:1". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  56. ^ "Tunisia - Equatorial Guinea 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  57. ^ "Algeria - Tunisia 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  58. ^ "Zimbabwe - Tunisia 2:4". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  59. ^ "Burkina Faso - Tunisia 2:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  60. ^ "Tunisia - Iran 1:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  61. ^ "Portugal - Tunisia 2:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  62. ^ "Spain - Tunisia 1:0". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  63. ^ "Tunisia - England 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  64. ^ "England kick off campaign with hard-fought victory". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 18 June 2018. Archived from the original on 18 June 2018.
  65. ^ "Belgium - Tunisia 5:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  66. ^ "Panama - Tunisia 1:2". www.flashscore.com. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  67. ^ Chowdhury, Saj (28 June 2018). "Wahbi Khazri scores as Tunisia end with 2-1 win over Panama". BBC Sport.
  68. ^ "Second-half surge sees Tunisia bow out in style". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 June 2018.
  69. ^ "Zambia vs. Tunisia - 7 September 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  70. ^ "Equatorial Guinea vs. Tunisia - 13 November 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  71. ^ "Tunisia vs. Mauritania - 7 October 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  72. ^ "Tunisia vs. Mauritania - 30 November 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  73. ^ "Syria vs. Tunisia - 3 December 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  74. ^ "Tunisia vs. UAE - 6 December 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  75. ^ "Tunisia vs. Egypt - 15 December 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  76. ^ "Tunisia vs. Algeria - 18 December 2021 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  77. ^ "Tunisia vs. Mali - 12 January 2022 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  78. ^ Lawless, Josh (13 January 2022). "AFCON Official Explains Why Referee From Tunisia Vs Mali Game Blew Early For Full-Time TWICE". SPORTbible. The LADbible Group Ltd. Archived from the original on 25 January 2022. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  79. ^ "Tunisia vs. Mauritania - 16 January 2022 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  80. ^ "Nigeria vs. Tunisia - 23 January 2022 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  81. ^ "Burkina Faso vs. Tunisia - 29 January 2022 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  82. ^ "Tunisia v Mali Match Report, 29/03/2022, WC Qualification Africa | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 8 December 2022.
  83. ^ "Match Report of Chile vs Tunisia - 2022-06-10 - Kirin Cup Soccer - Global Sports Archive". globalsportsarchive.com. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  84. ^ "Tunisia beat Japan to win Kirin Cup". France 24. 14 June 2022. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  85. ^ "Kirin Cup / Tunisie: Ferjani Sassi et Issam Jebali récompensés". africafootunited. 15 June 2022.
  86. ^ "Global Sports Archive". 22 September 2022.
  87. ^ "FIFA". 27 September 2022.
  88. ^ "FIFA World Cup 2022 Group D Teams: France, Australia, Denmark and Tunisia to face one another in Group D". The Indian Express. 16 November 2022. Retrieved 8 December 2022.
  89. ^ Alexander, Duncan (22 November 2022). "Denmark 0-0 Tunisia: Goalless, but Far From Drab". The Analyst. Retrieved 8 December 2022.
  90. ^ AfricaNews (26 November 2022).