Finland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Huuhkajat
(The Eagle-owls)[1]
AssociationFootball Association of Finland
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachMarkku Kanerva
CaptainLukas Hradecky
Most capsJari Litmanen (137)
Top scorerTeemu Pukki (40)
Home stadiumHelsinki Olympic Stadium
FIFA codeFIN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 60 Decrease 1 (15 February 2024)[2]
Highest33 (March 2007)
Lowest110 (July–August 2017)
First international
 Finland 2–5 Sweden 
(Helsinki, Finland; 22 October 1911)
as Finland
 Sweden 1–0 Finland 
(Stockholm, Sweden; 29 May 1919)
Biggest win
 Finland 10–2 Estonia 
(Helsinki, Finland; 11 August 1922)
 Finland 8–0 San Marino 
(Helsinki, Finland; 17 November 2010)
Biggest defeat
 Germany 13–0 Finland 
(Leipzig, Germany; 1 September 1940)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2020)
Best resultGroup stage (2020)
Olympic Games
Appearances4 (first in 1912)
Best resultFourth place (1912)

The Finland national football team (Finnish: Suomen jalkapallomaajoukkue, Swedish: Finlands fotbollslandslag) represents Finland in men's international football competitions and is controlled by the Football Association of Finland, the governing body for football in Finland, which was founded in 1907. The team has been a member of FIFA since 1908 and a UEFA member since 1957.

Finland had never qualified for a major tournament until securing a spot at UEFA Euro 2020. After decades of average results and campaigns, the nation made progress in the 2000s, achieving notable results against established European teams and reaching a peak of 33rd in the FIFA World Rankings in 2007. Afterward, their performances and results declined, drawing them to their all-time low of 110th in the FIFA Rankings in 2017. However, after six years of their all-time low in the FIFA Rankings, as of September 2023, they sit at 54th place in the overall ranking.[5]

History

Finland team playing a Moscow XI in Moscow 1912

Early history

The Football Association of Finland was founded in 1907 and became a member of FIFA the next year. At the time, Finland was an autonomous grand duchy ruled by the Russian Emperors. Finland played its first international on 22 October 1911, as Sweden beat the Finns at the Eläintarha Stadium in Helsinki. Finland participated the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, beating Italy and the Russian Empire, but losing the bronze medal match against the Netherlands.

Period of dispersion

The Finnish national team against Denmark in 1933

After the 1918 Civil War, the Finnish sports movement was divided into the right-wing Finnish Gymnastics and Sports Federation (SVUL) and the leftist Finnish Workers' Sports Federation (TUL), Finnish Football Association was a member of the SVUL.[6] Both sides had their own championship series, and between 1919 and 1939 the Finland national team was selected of the Football Association players only. The Finnish Workers' Sports Federation football team in turn, participated in the competitions of the international labour movement.[7]

However, since the late 1920s several top footballers defected from TUL and joined the Football Association to be eligible for the national team. During the 1930s, these ″defectors″ formed the spine of the national team. For example, the Finland squad at the 1936 Summer Olympics was composed of eight former TUL players.[7] In 1937, Finland participated the FIFA World Cup qualification for the first time, losing all three matches against Sweden, Germany and Estonia.

Since 1939, TUL players were selected for the national team and finally, in 1956, the TUL and Football Association series were merged.[7]

Post-war years

The 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki saw the Finnish hosts lose to Austria in the first round. Finland did, however, win the unofficial Nordic championship in 1964 and 1966.[8]

Finland also took part in European Championship qualifying since the 1968 event, but had to wait for its first win until 1978.

Late 20th century

Finnish team after the victory over Yugoslavia in 1950
Finland against the Netherlands from 1975

Finland missed out on qualification for Euro 1980 by just a point and for the 1986 World Cup by two points. Finland was invited to take part in the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow after many Western countries announced they would boycott the games, but failed to progress from its group.

By the mid-1990s Finland started to have more players in high-profile European leagues, led by Ajax superstar Jari Litmanen.[9] In 1996, Euro 1992-winning coach Richard Møller Nielsen was hired to take Finland to the 1998 World Cup. The team enjoyed mixed fortunes in the campaign, the high points of which were a draw and a win away to Norway and Switzerland respectively. Going into the last match, Finland would have needed a win at home to Hungary to earn a place in the play-offs. They led the game 1–0 going into injury time, but scored an own goal, and their qualification campaign was over. Møller Nielsen also tried to lead Finland to Euro 2000. In this campaign, the Finns recorded a sensational win away to Turkey, but couldn't compete with Germany and Turkey in the long run.

Jari Litmanen is widely regarded as Finland's greatest footballer of all time.

Antti Muurinen succeeded Møller Nielsen as coach in 2000. He had arguably the most talented group of Finnish players ever at his disposal, including players such as Antti Niemi, Sami Hyypiä, Teemu Tainio and Mikael Forssell in addition to the legendary Litmanen. The team also performed quite well under him in qualification for the 2002 World Cup despite a difficult draw, earning two draws against Germany and a home draw with England as well as beating Greece 5–1 in Helsinki. In the end, however, England and Germany proved too strong, and the Finns finished third in the group, but were the only team in that group not to lose at home. Hopes were high going into qualification for Euro 2004 after the promising last campaign and friendly wins over the likes of Norway, Belgium and Portugal (which seen the Finns jump from 40th to 30th in the Elo ranking[4]). However, Finland started the campaign by losing to Wales and Yugoslavia (later Serbia and Montenegro, now two separate nations). These losses were followed by two defeats by Italy, and a 3–0 home win over Serbia and Montenegro was little consolation, as the Finns finished fourth in the group. In qualification for the 2006 World Cup Finland failed to score a single point in six matches against the top three teams in their group, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Romania. Muurinen was sacked in June 2005, and he was replaced by caretaker Jyrki Heliskoski, but results didn't improve.

In August 2005, it was announced that Englishman Roy Hodgson would become the new Finland coach in 2006, and he started the job in January of that year. Hodgson stepped down as manager after they failed to qualify for Euro 2008.[10] His replacement was a Scotsman, Stuart Baxter, who signed a contract until the end of the 2012 European Championship qualification campaign.[11]

Recent history

Markku Kanerva managed to lead his Finnish national team to first time qualification to a UEFA European Tournament.

In the Euro 2008 qualifying Finland needed to win their last qualifying game away to Portugal to qualify for their first major football tournament. However, the match ended 0–0 meaning the team missed out on qualification to the tournament, with Finland ending the group stage with 24 points and Portugal with 27 points. However, the performance in qualifying led to the Finns gaining their best-ever FIFA world ranking to date at 33rd.

The 2010 World Cup qualifying campaign under new head coach Stuart Baxter saw Finland again finish third in their group with five wins, three draws and two defeats. They were the only team in qualifying not to lose to eventual 3rd-place finishers Germany; in both the home and away matches Finland had led Germany only to concede late equalizers. Finland finished a disappointing fourth in Euro 2012 qualifying, with only three wins, two of them against minnows San Marino.

In the 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign, Finland's best result was a 1–1 draw at reigning world champions Spain. They finished third in the five-team Group I, behind Spain and France. Finland finished fourth in Euro 2016 qualifying but achieved another noteworthy result. Joel Pohjanpalo's goal gave the Finns a 1–0 win at former European champions Greece, who had reached the second round of the 2014 World Cup and were the top seeds of their qualifying group.

The 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign saw Finland finish a disappointing fifth in their group with only two wins, although one of them was over Iceland, who finished top of the qualifying group.

On 15 November 2019, Finland managed to qualify to the first major tournament, UEFA Euro 2020, in their history after defeating Liechtenstein 3–0.[12] The successful qualifying campaign in Group J, was aided by a distinctive performance of Teemu Pukki, who scored ten goals in the qualifications.[13]

On 12 June 2021 in the Euro 2020 Finland had their first victory on their debut in a major tournament finals, Joel Pohjanpalo scored the only goal, a header in a 1–0 win over Denmark to grant his country their first goal and win in a major competition.[14] Unfortunately, having lost the next two games from both Russia and Belgium to finish third, Finland was eliminated from the group stage alongside fellow debutants North Macedonia as a result of their poor performance after being edged out by fourth placed team Ukraine among third place teams due to goal difference.

Home stadiums

Helsinki Central Station lantern carriers dressed in national colours during the 2020 European Championships in 2021
Finnish national team supporters at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 2009

Most of Finland's home matches are played at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in the capital, Helsinki. It has been Finland's principal home stadium ever since its construction was completed in 1938. Before that, Pallokenttä in Helsinki was mainly used.

Today, some qualifying matches against lower profile opponents and some friendlies are hosted at the Tampere Stadium in Tampere and Veritas Stadion in Turku. Helsinki's Bolt Arena, which has artificial turf, is also used for some friendlies and qualifiers. During the reconstruction of Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 2016–20, Tampere Stadium served as the main stadium for qualifying games.

Kits and crest

Finland's home kit worn at UEFA Euro 2020

Finland's kit are currently supplied by American brand Nike. They replaced German company Adidas, who supplied Finland's kits between 1979 and 2013.

Kit sponsorship

Kit supplier Period
Germany Adidas 1979–2013
United States Nike 2014–present

Results and fixtures

Main article: Finland national football team results (2020-present)

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2023

16 June 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Finland  2–0  Slovenia Helsinki, Finland
21:45 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 32,560
Referee: Guillermo Cuadra Fernández (Spain)
19 June 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Finland  6–0  San Marino Helsinki, Finland
21:45 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 32,812
Referee: Genc Nuza (Kosovo)
7 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Kazakhstan  0–1  Finland Astana, Kazakhstan
20:00 UTC+6 Report
Stadium: Astana Arena
Attendance: 30,019
Referee: Radu Petrescu (Romania)
10 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Finland  0–1  Denmark Helsinki, Finland
19:00 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 32,571
Referee: Szymon Marciniak (Poland)
14 October 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Slovenia  3–0  Finland Ljubljana, Slovenia
18:00 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Stožice Stadium
Attendance: 15,823
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
17 October 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Finland  1–2  Kazakhstan Helsinki, Finland
19:00 UTC+3
Report
Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 30,375
Referee: Irfan Peljto (Bosnia and Herzegovina)
17 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Finland  4–0  Northern Ireland Helsinki, Finland
19:00 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 28,711
Referee: Aliyar Aghayev (Azerbaijan)
20 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying San Marino  1–2  Finland Serravalle, San Marino
20:45 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Stadio Olimpico de Serravalle
Attendance: 1,427
Referee: Manfredas Lukjančukas (Lithuania)

2024

21 March 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying play-offs Wales  4–1  Finland Cardiff, Wales
20:45 Report
Stadium: Cardiff City Stadium
Attendance: 32,162
Referee: István Kovács (Romania)
26 March 2024 Friendly Finland  2–1  Estonia Helsinki, Finland
17:00
Report
Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Referee: Mads Kristoffersen (Denmark)
4 June 2024 Friendly Portugal  v  Finland Lisbon, Portugal
19:45 UTC+1 Stadium: Estádio José Alvalade
7 June 2024 Friendly Scotland  v  Finland Glasgow, Scotland
19:45 UTC+1 Stadium: Hampden Park
7 September 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Greece  v  Finland Athens, Greece
Stadium: Agia Sophia Stadium
10 September 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 England  v  Finland London, England
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
10 October 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Finland  v  Republic of Ireland Helsinki, Finland
Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
13 October 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Finland  v  England Helsinki, Finland
Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
14 November 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Republic of Ireland  v  Finland Dublin, Ireland
Stadium: Aviva Stadium
17 November 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Finland  v  Greece Helsinki, Finland
Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium

Coaching staff

[15][16][17]

Position Name
Head coach Finland Markku Kanerva
Assistant coach Finland Mika Nurmela
Finland Toni Korkeakunnas
Goalkeeping coach Finland Antti Niemi
Fitness coach Finland Jari-Pekka Keurulainen
Physiotherapists Finland Jari-Pekka Keurulainen
Finland Paavo Leiramo
Video analyst Finland Henri Lehto
Finland Sixten Boström
Doctor Finland Heikki Kinnunen
Osteopath Finland Hannu Kanerva
Kit Manager Finland Jari Parikka
Team Manager Finland Lennart Wangel
Technical director Finland Aki Hyryläinen

Coaching history

As of 7 September 2023.

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for the UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying play-off match against Wales and friendly against Estonia on 21 and 26 March 2024, respectively.[18]

Caps and goals as of 26 March 2024, after the match against  Estonia.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Lukas Hradecky (captain) (1989-11-24) 24 November 1989 (age 34) 91 0 Germany Bayer Leverkusen
12 1GK Jesse Joronen (1993-03-21) 21 March 1993 (age 31) 18 0 Italy Venezia
23 1GK Viljami Sinisalo (2001-10-11) 11 October 2001 (age 22) 2 0 England Exeter City

2 2DF Matti Peltola (2002-07-03) 3 July 2002 (age 21) 7 0 United States D.C. United
3 2DF Richard Jensen (1996-03-17) 17 March 1996 (age 28) 13 0 Scotland Aberdeen
4 2DF Robert Ivanov (1994-09-19) 19 September 1994 (age 29) 28 0 Germany Eintracht Braunschweig
5 2DF Arttu Hoskonen (1997-04-16) 16 April 1997 (age 26) 11 0 Poland Cracovia
13 2DF Pyry Soiri (1994-09-22) 22 September 1994 (age 29) 44 7 Romania Universitatea Craiova
15 2DF Miro Tenho (1995-04-02) 2 April 1995 (age 29) 4 0 Sweden Djurgården
17 2DF Nikolai Alho (1993-03-12) 12 March 1993 (age 31) 36 0 Greece Volos
18 2DF Jere Uronen (1994-07-13) 13 July 1994 (age 29) 67 1 United States Charlotte FC

6 3MF Glen Kamara (1995-10-28) 28 October 1995 (age 28) 59 2 England Leeds United
7 3MF Anssi Suhonen (2001-01-14) 14 January 2001 (age 23) 7 0 Germany Hamburger SV
8 3MF Robin Lod (1993-04-17) 17 April 1993 (age 30) 66 6 United States Minnesota United
9 3MF Fredrik Jensen (1997-09-09) 9 September 1997 (age 26) 30 8 Germany FC Augsburg
11 3MF Rasmus Schüller (vice-captain) (1991-06-18) 18 June 1991 (age 32) 75 0 Sweden Djurgården
14 3MF Kaan Kairinen (1998-12-22) 22 December 1998 (age 25) 17 0 Czech Republic Sparta Prague
16 3MF Oliver Antman (2001-08-15) 15 August 2001 (age 22) 10 5 Denmark Nordsjælland
21 3MF Daniel Håkans (2000-10-26) 26 October 2000 (age 23) 8 4 Norway Vålerenga
22 3MF Ilmari Niskanen (1997-10-12) 12 October 1997 (age 26) 18 1 England Exeter City

10 4FW Teemu Pukki (vice-captain) (1990-03-29) 29 March 1990 (age 34) 120 40 United States Minnesota United
19 4FW Benjamin Källman (1998-06-17) 17 June 1998 (age 25) 19 6 Poland Cracovia
20 4FW Joel Pohjanpalo (1994-09-13) 13 September 1994 (age 29) 71 15 Italy Venezia

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team within the last twelve months and are still available for selection.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Hugo Keto (1998-02-09) 9 February 1998 (age 26) 0 0 Norway Sandefjord v.  San Marino, 20 November 2023

DF Tomas Galvez (2005-01-28) 28 January 2005 (age 19) 2 0 England Manchester City v.  San Marino, 20 November 2023
DF Noah Pallas (2001-02-09) 9 February 2001 (age 23) 3 0 Finland HJK v.  San Marino, 20 November 2023
DF Tuomas Ollila (2000-04-25) 25 April 2000 (age 23) 2 0 France Paris FC v.  Kazakhstan, 17 October 2023
DF Diogo Tomas (1997-07-31) 31 July 1997 (age 26) 4 0 Finland HJK v.  Kazakhstan, 17 October 2023
DF Leo Väisänen (1997-07-24) 24 July 1997 (age 26) 26 0 United States Austin FC v.  Kazakhstan, 17 October 2023
DF Kevin Kouassivi-Benissan (1999-01-25) 25 January 1999 (age 25) 0 0 Finland HJK v.  Denmark, 10 September 2023

MF Robert Taylor (1994-10-21) 21 October 1994 (age 29) 34 2 United States Inter Miami v.  Wales, 21 March 2024 WD
MF Lucas Lingman (1998-01-25) 25 January 1998 (age 26) 11 0 Finland HJK v.  San Marino, 20 November 2023
MF Niilo Mäenpää (1998-01-14) 14 January 1998 (age 26) 3 0 Poland Warta Poznań v.  Kazakhstan, 17 October 2023

FW Marcus Forss (1999-06-18) 18 June 1999 (age 24) 21 2 England Middlesbrough v.  Wales, 21 March 2024 INJ

Notes
  • INJ = Withdrew due to an injury
  • WD = Withdrew due to a non-injury issue
  • PRE = Preliminary squad / standby
  • RET = Retired from international duty

Player records

As of 21 March 2024.[19]
  Players still active are highlighted in blue

Most appearances

Jari Litmanen is Finland's most capped player with 137 appearances.
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Jari Litmanen 137 32 1989–2010
2 Teemu Pukki 120 40 2009–present
3 Sami Hyypiä 106 5 1992–2010
Jonatan Johansson 106 22 1996–2010
5 Ari Hjelm 100 20 1983–1996
6 Joonas Kolkka 98 11 1994–2010
7 Lukas Hradecky 91 0 2010–present
8 Mikael Forssell 87 29 1999–2014
9 Erkka Petäjä 84 0 1983–1994
Tim Sparv 84 1 2009–2021

Top goalscorers

Teemu Pukki is Finland's top scorer with 40 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Teemu Pukki 40 120 0.34 2009–present
2 Jari Litmanen 32 137 0.23 1989–2010
3 Mikael Forssell 29 87 0.33 1999–2014
4 Jonatan Johansson 22 106 0.21 1996–2010
5 Ari Hjelm 20 100 0.2 1983–1996
6 Mixu Paatelainen 18 70 0.26 1986–2000
7 Verner Eklöf 17 32 0.53 1919-1927
8 Aulis Koponen 16 39 0.41 1924–1935
Gunnar Åström 16 44 0.36 1923–1937
10 Joel Pohjanpalo 15 71 0.21 2012–present

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Campaign Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Declined invitation
Italy 1934 Did not enter
France 1938 Did not qualify 1938 3 0 0 3 0 7
Brazil 1950 Withdrew during qualifying 1950 2 0 1 1 1 4
Switzerland 1954 Did not qualify 1954 4 0 2 2 7 13
Sweden 1958 1958 4 0 0 4 2 19
Chile 1962 1962 4 0 0 4 3 12
England 1966 1966 6 1 0 5 5 20
Mexico 1970 1970 6 1 0 5 6 28
West Germany 1974 1974 6 1 1 4 3 21
Argentina 1978 1978 6 2 0 4 11 16
Spain 1982 1982 8 1 0 7 4 27
Mexico 1986 1986 8 3 2 3 7 12
Italy 1990 1990 6 1 1 4 4 16
United States 1994 1994 10 2 1 7 9 18
France 1998 1998 8 3 2 3 11 12
South Korea Japan 2002 2002 8 3 3 2 12 7
Germany 2006 2006 12 5 1 6 21 19
South Africa 2010 2010 10 5 3 2 14 14
Brazil 2014 2014 8 2 3 3 5 9
Russia 2018 2018 10 2 3 5 9 13
Qatar 2022 2022 8 3 2 3 10 10
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined To be determined
Morocco Portugal Spain 2030
Saudi Arabia 2034
Total 0/22 137 35 25 77 144 297

UEFA European Championship

Main article: Finland at the UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Campaign Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Did not enter Did not enter
Spain 1964
Italy 1968 Did not qualify 1968 6 0 2 4 5 12
Belgium 1972 1972 6 0 1 5 1 16
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 1976 6 0 1 5 3 13
Italy 1980 1980 6 2 2 2 10 15
France 1984 1984 6 0 1 5 3 14
West Germany 1988 1988 6 1 1 4 4 10
Sweden 1992 1992 8 1 4 3 5 8
England 1996 1996 10 5 0 5 18 18
Belgium Netherlands 2000 2000 8 3 1 4 13 13
Portugal 2004 2004 8 3 1 4 9 10
Austria Switzerland 2008 2008 14 6 6 2 13 7
Poland Ukraine 2012 2012 10 3 1 6 16 16
France 2016 2016 10 3 3 4 9 10
Europe 2020 Group stage 17th 3 1 0 2 1 3 Squad 2020 10 6 0 4 16 10
Germany 2024 Did not qualify 2024 (PO) 11 6 0 5 19 14
United Kingdom Republic of Ireland 2028 To be determined To be determined
Italy Turkey 2032
Total Group stage 1/17 3 1 0 2 1 3 125 39 24 62 144 186

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
Season Division Group Pos Pld W D L GF GA P/R RK
2018–19 C 2 1st 6 4 0 2 5 3 Rise 28th
2020–21 B 4 2nd 6 4 0 2 7 5 Same position 21st
2022–23 B 3 2nd 6 2 2 2 8 6 Same position 21st
2024–25 B 2 To be determined
Total 18 10 2 6 20 14 21st

Olympic Games

Olympic Games record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
As Grand Duchy of Finland
Greece 1896 No football tournament was held
France 1900 Did not enter
United States 1904
United Kingdom 1908
Sweden 1912 Fourth place 4th 4 2 0 2 5 16 Squad
Since 1917, Declaration of Independence Finland
Belgium 1920 Did not enter
France 1924
Netherlands 1928
United States 1932 No football tournament was held
Nazi Germany 1936 Round of 16 14th 1 0 0 1 3 7 Squad
United Kingdom 1948 Did not enter
Finland 1952 Round of 16 9th 1 0 0 1 3 4 Squad
Australia 1956 Did not enter
Italy 1960 Did not qualify
Japan 1964
Mexico 1968
West Germany 1972
Canada 1976
Soviet Union 1980 Group stage 9th 3 1 1 1 3 2 Squad
United States 1984 Did not qualify
South Korea 1988
Since 1992 Olympic football has been an under-23 tournament
Total Fourth place 4/17 9 3 1 5 14 29

Nordic Football Championship

Nordic Football Championship record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
1929–32 Fourth place 4th 12 2 2 8 23 52
1933–36 12 3 1 8 18 36
1937–47 12 1 1 10 12 51
1948–51 12 1 3 8 11 28
1952–55 12 1 1 10 13 53
1956–59 12 0 1 11 8 44
1960–63 12 2 2 8 14 37
1964–67 Third place 3rd 12 5 2 5 14 17
1968–71 Fourth place 4th 12 0 4 8 10 31
1972–77 12 1 4 7 10 26
1978–80 6 1 4 7 10 26
1981–85 6 1 1 4 7 11
2000–01 Champions 1st 5 4 0 1 7 3
Total 1 Title 13/14 137 21 24 92 150 401

Baltic Cup

Baltic Cup record
Year Result Pld W D L GF GA
2012 Runners-up 2 1 1 0 3 2
2014 Third place 2 1 0 1 2 1
Total 4 2 1 1 5 3

Head-to-head record

This list is Finland national team complete records, both friendlies and competitive matches.[20]

As of 17 October 2023.[21]
Opponent GP W D L GF GA GD Win %
All Nations 772 204 157 411 910 1,605 −695 026.42
Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD % Won
 Albania 7 4 1 2 8 6 +2 057.14
 Algeria 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 000.00
 Andorra 2 1 1 0 3 0 +3 050.00
 Armenia 6 5 1 0 11 1 +10 083.33
 Austria 11 1 2 8 11 24 −13 009.09
 Azerbaijan 8 7 0 1 15 5 +10 087.50
 Bahrain 5 4 1 0 9 1 +8 080.00
 Barbados 1 0 1 0 0 0 +0 000.00
 Belarus 5 2 3 0 7 4 +3 040.00
 Belgium 11 4 4 3 19 20 −1 036.36
 Bermuda 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100.00
 Bolivia 2 0 1 1 2 5 −3 000.00
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 7 2 2 3 11 12 −1 028.57
 Brazil 3 0 0 3 3 9 −6 000.00
 Bulgaria 10 2 1 7 3 19 −16 020.00
 Cameroon 2 0 1 1 0 2 −2 000.00
 Canada 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1 100.00
 Chile 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 000.00
 China 4 1 0 3 7 6 +1 025.00
 Colombia 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 000.00
 Costa Rica 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 000.00
 Croatia 2 0 1 1 1 2 −1 000.00
 Cyprus 4 2 1 1 7 4 +3 050.00
 Czech Republic 11 3 3 5 14 22 −8 027.27
 Denmark 62 12 10 40 62 155 −93 019.35
 East Germany 7 2 1 4 8 21 −13 028.57
 Ecuador 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 000.00
 Egypt 2 0 0 2 2 4 −2 000.00
 England 13 0 2 11 7 44 −37 000.00
 Estonia 33 15 10 8 74 41 +33 045.45
 Faroe Islands 5 5 0 0 15 1 +14 100.00
 France 11 1 0 10 3 22 −19 009.09
 Georgia 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 050.00
 Germany 23 1 6 16 19 82 −63 004.35
 Greece 18 6 3 9 22 29 −7 033.33
 Honduras 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.00
 Hungary 17 3 3 11 15 48 −33 017.65
 Iceland 14 7 3 4 21 15 +6 050.00
 India 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2 050.00
 Indonesia 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 000.00
 Iraq 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00
 Ireland 5 0 2 3 2 11 −9 000.00
 Israel 5 2 1 2 6 6 +0 040.00
 Italy 13 1 1 11 7 32 −25 007.69
 Japan 2 0 0 2 1 7 −6 000.00
 Jordan 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.00
 Kazakhstan 7 5 1 1 9 3 +6 071.43
 Kosovo 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 050.00
 Kuwait 7 3 2 2 6 5 +1 042.86
 Latvia 17 10 3 4 32 18 +14 058.82
 Liechtenstein 5 3 2 0 9 3 +6 060.00
 Lithuania 5 3 0 2 15 5 +10 060.00
 Luxembourg 5 4 0 1 12 4 +8 080.00
 Malaysia 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 000.00
 Malta 7 4 2 1 9 5 +4 057.14
 Mexico 4 0 1 3 2 7 −5 000.00
 Moldova 4 2 1 1 7 5 +2 050.00
 Montenegro 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 100.00
 Morocco 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 050.00
 Netherlands 14 1 2 11 14 43 −29 007.14
 North Korea 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00
 North Macedonia 7 3 3 1 12 3 +9 042.86
 Northern Ireland 10 4 2 4 14 12 +2 040.00
 Norway 67 9 17 41 82 182 −100 013.43
 Oman 6 3 3 0 7 2 +5 050.00
 Peru 1 0 0 1 3 7 −4 000.00
 Poland 29 3 8 18 25 67 −42 010.34
 Portugal 10 1 4 5 6 14 −8 010.00
 Qatar 4 1 3 0 4 3 +1 025.00
 Romania 13 0 5 8 6 29 −23 000.00
 Russia 21 1 5 15 13 67 −54 004.76
 San Marino 5 5 0 0 21 0 +21 100.00
 Saudi Arabia 4 2 1 1 7 4 +3 050.00
 Scotland 8 0 2 6 5 18 −13 000.00
 Serbia 10 2 2 6 10 32 −22 020.00
 Slovakia 3 0 1 2 1 4 −3 000.00
 Slovenia 4 2 1 1 5 4 +1 050.00
 South Korea 3 0 0 3 0 5 −5 000.00
 Spain 8 1 2 5 5 16 −11 012.50
 Sweden 90 11 11 68 96 296 −200 012.22
  Switzerland 5 2 0 3 5 7 −2 040.00
 Thailand 5 5 0 0 12 6 +6 100.00
 Trinidad and Tobago 5 3 1 1 8 7 +1 060.00
 Tunisia 3 2 1 0 6 2 +4 066.67
 Turkey 15 6 4 5 22 24 −2 040.00
 United Arab Emirates 1 0 1 0 1 1 +0 000.00
 Ukraine 4 0 1 3 3 6 −3 000.00
 United States 2 0 0 2 1 3 −2 000.00
 Uruguay 2 0 0 2 1 8 −7 000.00
 Wales 13 4 5 4 12 17 −5 030.77
 Yemen 1 0 1 0 0 0 +0 000.00
Total 772 204 157 411 910 1,605 −695 026.42

Honours

Minor tournaments

See also

References

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