Czech Republic
Shirt badge/Association crest
AssociationFootball Association of the Czech Republic (FAČR)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachJaroslav Šilhavý
CaptainTomáš Souček
Most capsPetr Čech (124)
Top scorerJan Koller (55)
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeCZE
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 35 Decrease 3 (6 October 2022)[1]
Highest2 (September 1999; January – May 2000; April – May 2005; January – May 2006)
Lowest67 (March 1994)
First international
 Hungary 2–1 Bohemia 
(Budapest, Hungary; 5 April 1903)
as Czech Republic
 Czech Republic 4–1 Turkey 
(Istanbul, Turkey; 23 February 1994)
Biggest win
 Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia 
(Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
as Czech Republic
 Czech Republic 8–1 Andorra 
(Liberec, Czech Republic; 4 June 2005)
 Czech Republic 7–0 San Marino 
(Liberec, Czech Republic; 7 October 2006)
 Czech Republic 7–0 San Marino 
(Uherské Hradiště, Czech Republic; 9 September 2009)
 Czech Republic 7–0 Kuwait 
(Olomouc, Czech Republic; 11 November 2021)
Biggest defeat
 Hungary 8–3 Czechoslovakia 
(Budapest, Hungary; 19 September 1937)
as Czech Republic
 England 5–0 Czech Republic 
(London, England; 22 March 2019)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1934)
Best resultRunners-up (1934, 1962)
UEFA European Championship
Appearances10 (first in 1960)
Best resultChampions (1976)
FIFA Confederations Cup
Appearances1 (first in 1997)
Best resultThird place (1997)

The Czech Republic national football team (Czech: Česká fotbalová reprezentace) represents the Czech Republic in international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of the Czech Republic (FAČR). Historically, the team participated in FIFA and UEFA competitions as Bohemia and Czechoslovakia.

Following the dissolution of Czechoslovakia, the first international competition of the Czech Republic was UEFA Euro 1996, where they finished runners-up and they have taken part at every European Championship since. Following the separation, they have featured at one FIFA World Cup, the 2006 tournament.

History

See also: Czechoslovakia national football team

1990s

When Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the Czech Republic team was formed. They played their first friendly match away to Turkey on 23 February 1994. The newly formed team played their first home game in Ostrava, against Lithuania, in which they registered their first home win.

Their first competitive match was part of the UEFA Euro 1996 qualifying campaign, in which they defeated Malta 6–1 in Ostrava. During the campaign, the Czech Republic registered six wins, three draws, and a defeat against Luxembourg, finishing their qualifying Group 5 in first place, ahead of group favourites the Netherlands. In the final tournament, hosted by England, the Czechs progressed from the group stage, despite a 2–0 opening game defeat to Germany. They progressed to the UEFA Euro 1996 Final, losing 2–1 to Germany at Wembley Stadium.

The Czechs finished third in the 1998 FIFA World Cup qualifying group, behind Spain and Yugoslavia, and subsequently missed the tournament.

2000s

The Czech Republic qualified for Euro 2000, winning all of their group games and conceding five goals.[3] In the finals the team were drawn in Group D, alongside France, the Netherlands and Denmark.[4] The team lost to the Netherlands after last-minute penalty[5] and lost the second match against France, which eliminated them from advancing to the knockout round. The Czech Republic managed a 2–0 win against Denmark in their final game courtesy of two goals from Vladimír Šmicer.[5]

Once again, the Czech Republic failed to qualify for the World Cup, this time finishing second in their 2002 qualification group, behind Denmark, and then being beaten 1–0 in both legs by Belgium in the UEFA play-offs for a place in the finals.

A team settled with Pavel Nedvěd, Jan Koller, Tomáš Rosický, Milan Baroš, Marek Jankulovski, Tomáš Galásek together with the emergence of goalkeeper Petr Čech were unbeaten in 2002 and 2003, scoring 53 goals in 19 games and qualifying for Euro 2004 in the process. The Czech Republic went on a 20-game unbeaten streak, which finally ended in Dublin on 31 March 2004 in a friendly match against the Republic of Ireland.[6] The Czechs entered the Euro finals in Group D, alongside the Netherlands, Germany and Latvia.[7] The team trailed 2–0 to the Netherlands before winning the game 3–2 and beat Germany in the final group match.[8] The Czech Republic beat Denmark in the quarter-final, went into the semi-final against Greece and Tomáš Rosický hit the bar after just two minutes, Jan Koller had shots saved by the Greek goalkeeper and Pavel Nedvěd left the pitch injured in the end of the first half. It was not to be as the 90 minutes finished goalless and Greece won the game in the last minute of the first half of extra-time with a silver goal.[9]

Czech Republic (red) v Ghana (white) at the 2006 World Cup.
Czech Republic (red) v Ghana (white) at the 2006 World Cup.

The Czech Republic achieved their record win during the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA), thrashing Andorra 8–1 in a qualification match in Liberec. In the same match, Jan Koller became the all-time top scorer for the national team with his 35th international goal.[10] At the end of the campaign, after finishing in second place in Group 1 then defeating Norway in a playoff, the Czechs qualified for their first FIFA World Cup.[11] The team was boosted prior to the play-off matches by the return of Pavel Nedvěd,[12] who had initially retired from international football after Euro 2004. The squad for the 2006 World Cup in Germany included 18 of the Euro 2004 team which reached the semi-finals. With the team ranked second in the world,[13] they started the tournament with a 3–0 win over the United States. During the game, however, Jan Koller was forced to leave with a hamstring injury,[14] putting him out of the tournament. In the next game, with Koller absent and Milan Baroš still recovering from injury, the team suffered a 2–0 loss to Ghana.[13] Baroš returned for the final game against Italy which the Czechs had to win to progress. The team were reduced to ten men as Jan Polák was dismissed before half-time for two bookable offences.[14] Italy went on to win 2–0. Pavel Nedvěd, Karel Poborský and Vratislav Lokvenc retired from the national team after this tournament.[15]

In the qualifying campaign for Euro 2008, they finished top of their group, above Germany on head-to-head records. The Czech Republic beat co-hosts Switzerland 1–0 in their opening game of the final tournament, before being beaten 3–1 by Portugal, meaning that they and Turkey carried identical records going into the final group game. Although the Czechs took a 2–0 lead just past the hour mark and looked set to qualify, Turkey scored three goals in the final 15 minutes of the game to win the game 3–2.[16]

The Czechs faced World Cup qualification, being drawn in Group 3, under the guidance of coach Petr Rada. They started with a 0–0 away draw against Northern Ireland, before losing to Poland. A late goal from Libor Sionko won the next game 1–0 against Slovenia. This was followed by a win against San Marino, and a goalless draw in Slovenia. In their following match, against neighbours Slovakia, a 2–1 defeat at home left Czech Republic in a precarious qualifying position. Manager Petr Rada was dismissed and six players were suspended.[17] Ivan Hašek took temporary charge as manager,[18] gaining four points from his first two matches, as the team drew away to group leaders Slovakia and thrashed San Marino 7–0 in Uherské Hradiště. They subsequently beat Poland in Prague but followed this result with a goalless draw against Northern Ireland, finishing third in the group and failing to qualify for the World Cup. Hašek announced his immediate resignation.[19]

2010s

A changed team under Michal Bílek entered the Euro 2012 qualifiers and began with a home loss to Lithuania. But a win at home to Scotland was followed by wins against Liechtenstein. Spain defeated Czech Republic in between the Liechtenstein games, but the play-off spot was still in their hands. In the next game, a last minute penalty from Michal Kadlec away to Scotland secured a 2–2 draw.[20] Despite Scotland winning their next two games and the Czechs again being defeated by Spain, the team could finish second if they could beat Lithuania away from home in the final game, assuming Spain would beat Scotland at home. Spain won 3–1 and Czech Republic defeated Lithuania 4–1 to seal second spot and a place in the play-offs. Czech Republic were drawn to face Montenegro in the two-legged play-off. A goal from Václav Pilař and a last minute second from Tomáš Sivok helped the Czechs to a 2–0 first leg lead. In the second leg in Podgorica, a late goal from Petr Jiráček sealed a 1–0 win and the Czechs ran out 3–0 aggregate winners and qualified for Euro 2012.

At the tournament, the Czechs lost their opening game 4–1 to Russia, with their only goal coming from Václav Pilař. In their second match, against Greece, the Czech Republic went 2–0 up within the first six minutes thanks to goals from Petr Jiráček and a second from Pilař. Following the half-time substitution of captain Tomáš Rosický, Greece scored a second-half goal following a mistake from Czech goalkeeper Petr Čech, although there were no more goals and the Czech Republic recorded their first win of the tournament.[21] Going into their third and final group match, the Czech Republic needed at least a draw against co-hosts Poland to advance to the knock-out stage of the tournament. A second-half strike by Jiráček proved the difference between the teams as the Czechs ran out 1–0 winners. Due to Greece beating Russia in the other group game, the Czech Republic subsequently finished top of Group A,[22] becoming the first team to ever win a group at the European Championships with a negative goal difference.[23] The Czech team faced Portugal in the quarter-finals. Portugal eventually made the breakthrough with 11 minutes remaining through a header from Cristiano Ronaldo to win the match 1–0 and eliminate Czech Republic.

Bílek stayed on as coach, despite unrest amongst fans, and was tasked with qualifying for the 2014 World Cup.[24] The Czechs were drawn into UEFA Qualifying Group B along with Italy, Denmark, Bulgaria, Armenia and Malta. The beginning of the campaign was [24] two goalless draws with Denmark and Bulgaria, paired with a narrow win against Malta, capping off their first three games. The team then lost 0–3 to Denmark at home. The team was able to win against Armenia and draw with group leaders Italy, but lost to both Armenia and Italy in the rematches.[24] Bílek resigned[24] after the loss and was replaced with assistant coach Josef Pešice.[25] In their last two games with their new coach, the Czechs recorded wins over Malta and Bulgaria but lost to Italy, leaving them in third place and ending their qualification hopes. Pešice resigned as coach following the conclusion of qualifying.

Pavel Vrba was appointed as the team's new coach on the first day of 2014, ahead of Euro 2016 qualifying.[26] The Czech team was drawn into[27] Group A, along with Netherlands, Turkey, Iceland, Latvia and Kazakhstan. The Czech team began with a win, defeating Netherlands, and followed up with victories over Turkey, Kazakhstan and Iceland, leaving them as group leaders with maximum points after four matches. A draw at home against Latvia followed; nonetheless, Czech Republic remained group leader, and on 6 September 2015, qualified for their sixth European Championship. They only got one point from a draw with Croatia, losing to Spain and Turkey. During a friendly match against Australia on 1 June 2018, the Czechs recorded their biggest defeat losing 0–4 in Sankt Pölten, Austria.[28] It was surpassed during their first qualifier for Euro 2020, as they were beaten 0–5 at Wembley Stadium by England.[29]

Present in Group C during the 2018 World Cup qualifiers, the Czech Republic failed to qualify for the Russian World Cup as it finished in 3rd place with 4 wins, 3 draws and 3 defeats, behind directly qualified Germany and Northern Ireland, then unfortunate play-off.

On the other hand, they qualified directly for UEFA Euro 2021, finishing 2nd in Group A during the qualifiers, with a record of 5 wins and 3 defeats in 8 games. The team won a prestigious home match against England, the group leader (2–1) and lost all three away matches, in England (0–5), Kosovo (1–2) and Bulgaria (0–1). It is placed in Group D for the first round of the finals, placed under the sign of reunion: with England played in the qualifiers, Croatia present in the same group 4 years earlier in France, as well as Scotland played in the framework of the 2020–21 UEFA Nations League.

2020s

On November 18, 2020, the Czech Republic, then placed in Group 2 of League B in the 2020–2021 edition of the Nations League, obtained promotion to League A for the next edition thanks to a win at home against Slovakia on the last day of the group stages (2–0), allowing the Národní tým to overtake Scotland, which was defeated in Israel (0–1) at the same time.[30] The team has a record of 4 wins and 2 losses (both in the first and second leg against Scotland, although the first leg in Prague was played by substitutes and U17-U19 players due to cases of COVID-19 affecting the regular starters).

The year 2021 starts on a positive note for the Czech Republic, which manages to catch Belgium at home (1–1) in the qualifiers for the 2022 World Cup. Above all, UEFA Euro 2021 saw the Národní tým realize a much better European campaign than the one in 2016 when they were quickly eliminated, finishing last in their group with only one point; as Jaroslav Šilhavý's men managed to get out of the group. Indeed, the Czech Republic won the first game against Scotland, who were playing at home, with a double from Patrik Schick (2–0), including a goal from more than 45 meters, lobbing the goalkeeper David Marshall who was too far forward on the second goal of the game, a technical gesture that made the world go round. It then gets a draw (1–1) against Croatia, finalist of the 2018 FIFA World Cup before losing on the last day against England at Wembley (0–1) with the assurance before the start of the game to be at worst among the 4 best 3rd of group and thus reach the last 16. The Czechs finished among the 4 best 3rd of the group with 4 points, ahead of Croatia, which has the same number of points and the same overall goal difference, but which inherited the 2nd place in the ranking at the expense of the Czechs since the Vatreni scored more goals (4 against 3). In the 1/8th finals, the Czech Republic faced the Netherlands, first of their group with 3 victories and mentioned among the favourites for the final victory. The Czech Republic made a great collective performance and created the surprise by winning 2–0 with goals from Tomáš Holeš (68th minute) and Patrik Schick (80th minute) while the Dutch team finished the game with 10 players, Matthijs de Ligt being sent off for a deliberate hand in the last defender's position,[31] preventing a Czech goal opportunity just before the hour mark The Národní tým, returning to the quarterfinal stage for the first time since 2012, challenged Denmark for a place in the last four of the competition. Unfortunately, they were beaten 1–2, having conceded the first Danish goal after 5 minutes of play due to a refereeing error caused by a non-existent corner,[32] and stopped at the gates of the semi-finals after a successful run. Patrik Schick was the Czech Republic's top scorer with 5 goals, as many as Cristiano Ronaldo at the finals, and both strikers finished as joint top scorers in the competition.

However, the Czech Republic failed to qualify for the World Cup in Qatar. The Czechs finished third in their group, behind Belgium and Wales, whom they failed to beat (home draw and away defeat in both cases), but they made it to the play-offs thanks to their position in the 2020–21 UEFA Nations League. They were eliminated in the semi-finals of the B lane, following an away defeat against Sweden in extra time (0–1, goal of Robin Quaison in the 110th minute).

Team image

Since 1994, the Czech Republic home kit has primarily been red shirts, with either blue or red shorts. While their away kit has been white shirts with white shorts. Although the team wore blue shorts for a short period between 2010 and 2011. In 2020 the team introduced a new alternate colour as the away kit for the first time.[33]

Stadiums

Ten different cities hosted national team matches of the Czech Republic between 1994 and 2011.[34] The most commonly-used stadium is Generali Arena, the home stadium of AC Sparta Prague. As of 3 June 2014, the team has played 36 of 92 home matches there. Since 2012, competitive games have also been held Doosan Arena, Plzeň.

Stadiums which have hosted Czech Republic international football matches:

Number of
matches
Stadium W D L First international Latest international
46 Generali Arena, Prague 27 7 12 26 April 1995 16 November 2021
20 Na Stínadlech, Teplice 18 1 1 18 September 1996 11 September 2012
17 Sinobo Stadium, Prague 6 6 5 27 May 2008 24 September 2022
13 Andrův stadion, Olomouc 9 0 4 25 March 1998 16 November 2022
8 Doosan Arena, Plzeň 7 1 0 12 October 2012 8 September 2021
5 Bazaly, Ostrava 4 0 1 25 May 1994 16 August 2000
4 Stadion u Nisy, Liberec 4 0 0 4 June 2005 11 August 2010
4 Městský stadion, Ostrava 3 1 0 26 March 1996 2 September 2021
3 Stadion Střelnice, Jablonec 3 0 0 4 September 1996 5 June 2009
3 Městský stadion, Uherské Hradiště 1 0 2 16 August 2006 6 September 2018
2 Stadion Evžena Rošického, Prague 1 1 0 24 April 1996 18 August 2004
2 Sportovní areál, Drnovice 2 0 0 18 August 1999 15 August 2001
2 Městský stadion, Mladá Boleslav 1 1 0 31 August 2016 15 November 2016
1 Stadion FC Bohemia Poděbrady, Poděbrady 1 0 0 26 February 1997
1 Stadion Za Lužánkami, Brno 1 0 0 8 March 1995
1 Stadion Střelecký ostrov, České Budějovice 1 0 0 29 March 2011
1 Městský stadion, Ústí nad Labem 1 0 0 22 March 2017

Results and fixtures

Main article: Czech Republic national football team results (2020–present)

2022

24 March 2022 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifying Sweden  1–0 (a.e.t.)  Czech Republic Solna, Sweden
20:45 UTC+1
  • Quaison 110'
Report Stadium: Friends Arena
Attendance: 48,628
Referee: Michael Oliver (England)
29 March 2022 (2022-03-29) Friendly Wales  1–1  Czech Republic Cardiff, Wales
19:45 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Cardiff City Stadium
Referee: Paul Tierney (England)
2 June 2022 (2022-06-02) 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Czech Republic  2–1  Switzerland Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
Attendance: 12,236
Referee: Daniel Siebert (Germany) / Harm Osmers (Germany) upward-facing green arrow 75'
5 June 2022 (2022-06-05) 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Czech Republic  2–2  Spain Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
Attendance: 18,245
Referee: François Letexier (France)
9 June 2022 (2022-06-09) 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Portugal  2–0  Czech Republic Lisbon, Portugal
19:45 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Estádio José Alvalade
Attendance: 44,100
Referee: Matej Jug (Slovenia)
12 June 2022 (2022-06-12) 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Spain  2–0  Czech Republic Málaga, Spain
20:45 UTC+2
Report Stadium: La Rosaleda
Attendance: 30,389
Referee: Cüneyt Çakır (Turkey)
24 September 2022 (2022-09-24) 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Czech Republic  0–4  Portugal Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 UTC+2 Report
Stadium: Fortuna Arena
Attendance: 19,322
Referee: Srđan Jovanović (Serbia)
27 September 2022 (2022-09-27) 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Switzerland  2–1  Czech Republic St. Gallen, Switzerland
20:45 UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Kybunpark
Attendance: 13,353
Referee: Irfan Peljto (Bosnia and Herzegovina)
16 November 2022 (2022-11-16) Friendly Czech Republic  5–0  Faroe Islands Olomouc, Czech Republic
18:00 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Andrův stadion
Attendance: 10,762
Referee: Martin Dohál (Slovakia)
19 November 2022 (2022-11-19) Friendly Turkey  v  Czech Republic Turkey

2023

24 March 2023 (2023-03-24) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Czech Republic  v  Poland Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
27 March 2023 (2023-03-27) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Moldova  v  Czech Republic Chișinău, Moldova
21:45 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Zimbru Stadium
17 June 2023 (2023-06-17) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Faroe Islands  v  Czech Republic Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
19:45 UTC+1 Report Stadium: Tórsvøllur
7 September 2023 (2023-09-07) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Czech Republic  v  Albania Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
12 October 2023 (2023-10-12) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Albania  v  Czech Republic Tirana, Albania
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Arena Kombëtare
15 October 2023 (2023-10-15) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Czech Republic  v  Faroe Islands Prague, Czech Republic
18:00 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
17 November 2023 (2023-11-17) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Poland  v  Czech Republic TBD, Poland
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: TBD
20 November 2023 (2023-11-20) UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Czech Republic  v  Moldova Prague, Czech Republic
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Sinobo Stadium

Coaching staff

Position Name
Head Coach Czech Republic Jaroslav Šilhavý
Assistant Coach Czech Republic Tomáš Galásek
Assistant Coach Czech Republic Jiří Chytrý
Goalkeeping Coach Czech Republic Milan Veselý

Coaching history

Players

Current squad

The following squad was called up for the friendly matches against Faroe Islands and Turkey on 16 and 19 November 2022, respectively.[35]

Caps and goals as of 16 November 2022, after the match against Faroe Islands.[36][37]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Jiří Pavlenka (1992-04-14) 14 April 1992 (age 30) 15 0 Germany Werder Bremen
1GK Tomáš Koubek (1992-08-26) 26 August 1992 (age 30) 11 0 Germany FC Augsburg
1GK Matouš Trmal (1998-10-02) 2 October 1998 (age 24) 0 0 Portugal Marítimo

2 2DF David Zima (2000-11-08) 8 November 2000 (age 22) 14 0 Italy Torino
4 2DF Jakub Brabec (1992-08-06) 6 August 1992 (age 30) 32 2 Greece Aris Thessaloniki
5 2DF Vladimír Coufal (1992-08-22) 22 August 1992 (age 30) 33 1 England West Ham United
13 2DF Aleš Matějů (1996-06-03) 3 June 1996 (age 26) 14 0 Italy Palermo
2DF Matěj Chaluš (1998-02-02) 2 February 1998 (age 24) 1 0 Sweden Malmö FF
2DF Dominik Plechatý (1999-04-18) 18 April 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Czech Republic Slovan Liberec
2DF Patrizio Stronati (1994-11-17) 17 November 1994 (age 28) 1 1 Hungary Puskás Akadémia
2DF Ondřej Zmrzlý (1999-04-22) 22 April 1999 (age 23) 1 0 Czech Republic Sigma Olomouc

3MF Antonín Barák (1994-12-03) 3 December 1994 (age 27) 34 8 Italy Fiorentina
3MF Jaromír Zmrhal (1993-08-02) 2 August 1993 (age 29) 21 1 Slovakia Slovan Bratislava
3MF Petr Schwarz (1991-11-12) 12 November 1991 (age 31) 1 0 Poland Śląsk Wrocław
17 3MF Václav Černý (1997-10-17) 17 October 1997 (age 25) 7 1 Netherlands Twente
21 3MF Alex Král (1998-05-19) 19 May 1998 (age 24) 33 2 Germany Schalke 04
22 3MF Tomáš Souček (captain) (1995-02-27) 27 February 1995 (age 27) 55 9 England West Ham United

9 4FW Adam Hložek (2002-07-25) 25 July 2002 (age 20) 19 1 Germany Bayer Leverkusen
10 4FW Patrik Schick (1996-01-24) 24 January 1996 (age 26) 35 18 Germany Bayer Leverkusen
4FW Martin Doležal (1990-05-03) 3 May 1990 (age 32) 6 0 Poland Zagłębie Lubin
4FW Mojmír Chytil (1999-04-29) 29 April 1999 (age 23) 1 3 Czech Republic Sigma Olomouc

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Czech Republic squad within the last twelve months:

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Tomáš Vaclík (1989-03-29) 29 March 1989 (age 33) 53 0 Greece Olympiacos v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
GK Jindřich Staněk (1996-04-27) 27 April 1996 (age 26) 5 0 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
GK Aleš Mandous (1992-04-21) 21 April 1992 (age 30) 3 0 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Spain, 12 June 2022
GK Milan Heča (1991-03-21) 21 March 1991 (age 31) 0 0 Czech Republic Sparta Prague v.  Wales, 29 March 2022

DF Václav Jemelka (1995-06-23) 23 June 1995 (age 27) 7 0 Czech Republic Sigma Olomouc v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
DF Ondřej Kúdela (1987-03-26) 26 March 1987 (age 35) 10 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
DF Milan Havel (1994-08-07) 7 August 1994 (age 28) 5 0 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
DF Jaroslav Zelený (1992-08-20) 20 August 1992 (age 30) 6 0 Czech Republic Sparta Prague v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
DF Tomáš Petrášek (1992-03-02) 2 March 1992 (age 30) 3 0 Poland Raków Częstochowa v.  Switzerland, 2 June 2022
DF Tomáš Holeš (1993-03-31) 31 March 1993 (age 29) 17 2 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Wales, 29 March 2022 INJ

MF Petr Ševčík (1994-05-04) 4 May 1994 (age 28) 14 0 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
MF Ondřej Lingr (1998-10-07) 7 October 1998 (age 24) 5 0 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
MF Lukáš Kalvach (1995-07-19) 19 July 1995 (age 27) 4 0 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
MF Adam Vlkanova (1994-09-04) 4 September 1994 (age 28) 3 0 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
MF Jakub Pešek (1993-06-24) 24 June 1993 (age 29) 14 5 Czech Republic Sparta Prague v.  Spain, 12 June 2022
MF Michal Sadílek (1999-05-31) 31 May 1999 (age 23) 14 0 Netherlands Twente v.  Spain, 12 June 2022
MF Jakub Jankto (1996-01-19) 19 January 1996 (age 26) 45 4 Czech Republic Sparta Prague v.  Spain, 5 June 2022
MF Ladislav Krejčí (1999-04-20) 20 April 1999 (age 23) 2 0 Czech Republic Sparta Prague v.  Switzerland, 2 June 2022
MF Lukáš Masopust (1993-02-12) 12 February 1993 (age 29) 31 2 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Wales, 29 March 2022 INJ
MF Jan Sýkora (1993-12-29) 29 December 1993 (age 28) 14 4 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň v.  Wales, 29 March 2022

FW Jan Kuchta (1997-01-08) 8 January 1997 (age 25) 12 2 Czech Republic Sparta Prague v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
FW Stanislav Tecl (1990-09-01) 1 September 1990 (age 32) 10 0 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
FW Lukáš Provod (1996-10-23) 23 October 1996 (age 26) 8 1 Czech Republic Slavia Prague v.  Switzerland, 27 September 2022
FW Václav Jurečka (1994-06-26) 26 June 1994 (age 28) 5 0 Czech Republic Slovácko v.  Spain, 12 June 2022
FW Tomáš Pekhart (1989-05-26) 26 May 1989 (age 33) 24 2 Turkey Gaziantep v.  Wales, 29 March 2022

Player statistics

Main article: List of Czech Republic international footballers

As of 27 September 2022[38]
Players in bold are still active with Czech Republic.
This list does not include players that won caps for Czechoslovakia.

Most capped players

Petr Čech, the most capped player in the history of the Czech Republic with 124 caps
Petr Čech, the most capped player in the history of the Czech Republic with 124 caps
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Petr Čech 124 0 2002–2016
2 Karel Poborský 118 8 1994–2006
3 Tomáš Rosický 105 23 2000–2016
4 Jaroslav Plašil 103 7 2004–2016
5 Milan Baroš 93 41 2001–2012
6 Jan Koller 91 55 1999–2009
Pavel Nedvěd 91 18 1994–2006
8 Vladimír Šmicer 81 27 1993–2005
9 Tomáš Ujfaluši 78 2 2001–2009
10 Marek Jankulovski 77 11 2000–2009

Top goalscorers

Jan Koller, the top scorer in the history of the Czech Republic with 55 goals
Jan Koller, the top scorer in the history of the Czech Republic with 55 goals
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Jan Koller (list) 55 91 0.6 1999–2009
2 Milan Baroš (list) 41 93 0.44 2001–2012
3 Vladimír Šmicer 27 81 0.33 1993–2005
4 Tomáš Rosický 23 105 0.22 2000–2016
5 Pavel Kuka 22 63 0.35 1994–2001
6 Patrik Schick 18 35 0.51 2016–present
Patrik Berger 18 44 0.41 1994–2001
Pavel Nedvěd 18 91 0.2 1994–2006
9 Vratislav Lokvenc 14 74 0.19 1995–2006
10 Tomáš Necid 12 44 0.27 2008–2016

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

Main article: Czech Republic at the FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
as  Czechoslovakia as  Czechoslovakia
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Did not enter
Italy 1934 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 9 6 Squad 1 1 0 0 2 1 1934
France 1938 Quarter-finals 5th 3 1 1 1 5 3 Squad 2 1 1 0 7 1 1938
Brazil 1950 Did not enter Did not enter
Switzerland 1954 Group stage 14th 2 0 0 2 0 7 Squad 4 3 1 0 5 1 1954
Sweden 1958 Group stage 9th 4 1 1 2 9 6 Squad 4 3 0 1 9 3 1958
Chile 1962 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 1 2 7 7 Squad 5 4 0 1 20 7 1962
England 1966 Did not qualify 6 3 1 2 12 4 1966
Mexico 1970 Group stage 15th 3 0 0 3 2 7 Squad 7 5 1 1 16 7 1970
West Germany 1974 Did not qualify 4 2 1 1 9 3 1974
Argentina 1978 4 2 0 2 4 6 1978
Spain 1982 Group stage 19th 3 0 2 1 2 4 Squad 8 4 2 2 15 6 1982
Mexico 1986 Did not qualify 8 3 2 3 11 12 1986
Italy 1990 Quarter-finals 6th 5 3 0 2 10 5 Squad 8 5 2 1 13 3 1990
United States 1994 Did not qualify 10 4 5 1 21 9 1994
as  Czech Republic as  Czech Republic
France 1998 Did not qualify 10 5 1 4 16 6 1998
South Korea Japan 2002 12 6 2 4 20 10 2002
Germany 2006 Group stage 20th 3 1 0 2 3 4 Squad 14 11 0 3 37 12 2006
South Africa 2010 Did not qualify 10 4 4 2 17 6 2010
Brazil 2014 10 4 3 3 13 9 2014
Russia 2018 10 4 3 3 17 10 2018
Qatar 2022 8 4 2 2 14 9 2022
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined To be determined 2026
Total Runners-up 9/22 33 12 5 16 47 49 146 78 31 37 278 126

UEFA European Championship

Main article: Czech Republic at the UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
as  Czechoslovakia as  Czechoslovakia
France 1960 Third place 3rd 2 1 0 1 2 3 Squad 6 4 1 1 16 5 1960
Spain 1964 Did not qualify 2 0 1 1 2 3 1964
Italy 1968 6 3 1 2 8 4 1968
Belgium 1972 6 4 1 1 11 4 1972
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 Champions 1st 2 1 1 0 5 3 Squad 8 5 2 1 19 7 1976
Italy 1980 Third place 3rd 4 1 2 1 5 4 Squad 6 5 0 1 17 4 1980
France 1984 Did not qualify 8 3 4 1 15 7 1984
West Germany 1988 6 2 3 1 7 5 1988
Sweden 1992 8 5 0 3 12 9 1992
as  Czech Republic as  Czech Republic
England 1996 Runners-up 2nd 6 2 2 2 7 8 Squad 10 6 3 1 21 6 1996
Belgium Netherlands 2000 Group stage 10th 3 1 0 2 3 3 Squad 10 10 0 0 26 5 2000
Portugal 2004 Semi-finals 3rd 5 4 0 1 10 5 Squad 8 7 1 0 23 5 2004
Austria Switzerland 2008 Group stage 11th 3 1 0 2 4 6 Squad 12 9 2 1 27 5 2008
Poland Ukraine 2012 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 4 6 Squad 10 6 1 3 15 8 2012
France 2016 Group stage 21st 3 0 1 2 2 5 Squad 10 7 1 2 19 14 2016
Europe 2020 Quarter-finals 6th 5 2 1 2 6 4 Squad 8 5 0 3 13 11 2021
Germany 2024 To Be Determined To Be Determined 2024
Total 1 Title 10/16 37 15 7 15 48 47 124 81 21 22 251 102

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
Season Division Group Pos Pld W D L GF GA P/R RK
2018–19 B 1 2nd 4 2 0 2 4 4 Same position 20th
2020–21 B 2 1st 6 4 0 2 9 5 Rise 19th
2022–23 A 2 4th 6 1 1 4 5 13 Fall 14th
2024–25 B To be determined
Total 16 7 1 8 18 22 14th

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
Saudi Arabia 1992 Did not qualify
Saudi Arabia 1995
Saudi Arabia 1997 Third place 3rd 5 2 1 2 10 7 Squad
Mexico 1999 Did not qualify
South Korea Japan 2001
France 2003
Germany 2005
South Africa 2009
Brazil 2013
Russia 2017
Total Third place 1/10 5 2 1 2 10 7

Head-to-head record (since 1994)

As of 27 September 2022 after the match against  Switzerland.[39]

  Positive Record   Neutral Record   Negative Record

  1. ^ Includes matches against  Serbia and Montenegro.

Honours

Competition 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total
FIFA World Cup 0 2 0 2
UEFA European Championship 1 1 3 5
FIFA Confederations Cup 0 0 1 1
Olympic Games 1 1 0 2
Total 2 4 4 10

See also

Notes

References

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  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 26 October 2022. Retrieved 26 October 2022.
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  39. ^ "World Football Elo Ratings: Czech Republic".