Indonesia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)
  • Merah Putih (Red-White)
  • Tim Garuda (Garuda Team)
AssociationPSSI
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationAFF (Southeast Asia)
Head coachShin Tae-yong
CaptainFachruddin Aryanto
Most capsAbdul Kadir (111)[1][2]
Top scorerAbdul Kadir (70)[2]
Home stadiumGelora Bung Karno Stadium
FIFA codeIDN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 155 Increase 4 (23 June 2022)[3]
Highest76 (September 1998)
Lowest191 (July 2016)
First international
 Dutch East Indies 7–1 Japan 
(Manila, Philippines; 13 May 1934)[4][5]
Biggest win
 Indonesia 12–0 Philippines 
(Seoul, South Korea; 21 September 1972)
 Indonesia 13–1 Philippines 
(Jakarta, Indonesia; 23 December 2002)
Biggest defeat
 Bahrain 10–0 Indonesia 
(Riffa, Bahrain; 29 February 2012)
World Cup
Appearances1 (as  Dutch East Indies) (first in 1938)
Best resultFirst round (1938)
Asian Cup
Appearances5 (first in 1996)
Best resultGroup stage (1996, 2000, 2004, 2007)
AFF Championship
Appearances13 (first in 1996)
Best resultRunners-up (2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2016, 2020)

The Indonesia national football team (Indonesian: Tim nasional sepak bola Indonesia) represents Indonesia in international association football. It was the first Asian team to participate in the FIFA World Cup, particularly in the 1938 edition as Dutch East Indies.[7] The 6–0 loss to eventual finalists Hungary in the first round remains the nation's only appearance in the World Cup. Thus, Indonesia holds the World Cup record as the team with the fewest matches played (1) and one of the teams with the fewest goals scored (0).[8]

The team's only appearance in the Olympics was in 1956.[9] Indonesia qualified for the AFC Asian Cup on five occasions and have never progressed beyond the group stage on the previous four tournaments. Indonesia achieved the bronze medal at the 1958 Asian Games in Tokyo.[9] The team has reached the AFF Championship final ties on six occasions and has never won the tournament. They share a local rivalry with ASEAN teams including the one against Malaysia which is somewhat pertained to cultural and political reasons.

History

Beginning

The matches involving sides from the Dutch East Indies (or Netherlands East Indies) were organised by the Nederlandsch Indische Voetbal Bond (NIVB), or its successor, the Nederlandsch Indische Voetbal Unie (NIVU). The matches that were run prior to the nation's independence in 1945 are not recognised by PSSI.[9]

The first recorded match that involved a team from the Dutch East Indies was a contest against a Singapore national team on 28 March 1921. The match was played in Batavia and the Dutch East Indies won with a final score of 1–0. This was followed by matches against an Australian XI in August 1928 (2–1 victory) and a team from Shanghai two years later (4–4 draw).[9]

In 1934, a team from Java represented the Dutch East Indies in the Far Eastern Games that was played in Manila. After defeating the Japanese, 7–1, in its first match,[10] the next two matches ended in defeats (2–0 to China and 3–2 to the host nation) resulting in a second-place tournament finish for the Java national team. Although not recognised by PSSI, these matches are treated by the World Football Elo ratings as the first matches involving the Indonesian national side.[11]

The Dutch East Indies were the first Asian team to participate in the FIFA World Cup, when the team qualified for the 1938 tournament after Japan withdrew from the qualification heats. The 6–0 loss to Hungary, in the first round of the tournament in Reims, remains the nation's only appearance in the World Cup.

1950s–1984

After the Second World War, followed by the Indonesian Revolution, a highlight of the football history of independent Indonesian team occurred at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne. The team forced the Soviet Union to a nil-all draw, then lost 0–4 in the replay match.[9] This remains the country's only appearance in the Olympics.

In 1958, the team tasted its first World Cup action as Indonesia in the qualifying rounds. The team defeated China in the first round, then subsequently refused to play its next opponents, Israel, for political reasons.[9]

Indonesia won the bronze medal at the 1958 Asian Games where it beat India 4–1 in the third-place match. The team also drew 2–2 with East Germany in a friendly match.[9]

The Indonesian team lifted the Merdeka Tournament trophy on three occasions (1961, 1962 and 1969). Indonesia were also champions of the 1968 King's Cup.[9]

Indonesia returned to World Cup qualification competition in 1974; the team was eliminated in the first round, with only one win from six matches, against New Zealand. During the 1978 qualification heats, the Indonesian team won a single match out of four matches, against host team, Singapore. Four years later, in 1982, Indonesia recorded two victories in qualifying matches, against Chinese Taipei and Australia.[9]

1985–1995

The 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification round saw Indonesia advanced from the first round with four wins, one draw and one loss, eventually finishing at the top of its group. South Korea emerged victorious over Indonesia in the second round.[9]

The team reached the semi-final of the 1986 Asian Games after beating United Arab Emirates in the quarter-finals. Indonesia then lost to hosts South Korea in the semi-finals and lost to Kuwait in the bronze medal match.[12]

A milestone during this era was the gold medal victory at the Southeast Asian Games in both 1987 and 1991. In 1987, Indonesia beat Malaysia 1–0; while in 1991, it beat Thailand in a penalty shoot-out.[9]

In the 1990 qualification, the team lost in the first round, with only one win against Hong Kong, three draws and two defeats.[9] The team also only managed a single victory against Vietnam in the 1994 qualification round.[9]

1995–2016

Asian Cup

Indonesia's first appearance in the AFC Asian Cup was against United Arab Emirates in the 1996 AFC Asian Cup. During the tournament, Indonesia only scored a single point from a 2–2 draw against Kuwait in the first round.[13]

The team's second appearance in the Asian Cup was in Lebanon in the 2000 AFC Asian Cup; again, the Indonesian team gained only one point from three games, and again, from a match against Kuwait that finished without a score from either side. Indonesia established a higher record in the 2004 AFC Asian Cup, beating Qatar 2–1 to record the team's first ever victory in the history of the tournament. The win was not enough for it to qualify for the second round, having fallen 0–5 to host China and 1–3 to Bahrain.

In the 2007 tournament, Indonesia acted as one of the four Southeast Asian co-hosts and get eliminated from the first round.[14][unreliable source?]

ASEAN Championship

Indonesia reached the finals of ASEAN Football Championship on six occasions (2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2016, and 2020), albeit never managing to lift the trophy victoriously. The team's claim of regional titles came in the Southeast Asian Games of 1987 and 1991.[15][16]

After the Withe era, the inability to fulfil the ASEAN target has been cited as the reason for Indonesia's "revolving door" in terms of team managers. Over the course of two years, the Indonesia's manager changed from Kolev to local coach Benny Dollo who was in turn sacked in 2010. The head coach position was then held by Alfred Riedl who failed to lift any cups and in July 2011 was then replaced by Wim Rijsbergen.[17][unreliable source?]

The 1998 Tiger Cup saw the group stage match between Thailand and Indonesia with both teams had already qualified for semi-finals but were also aware that the winner would have to face hosts Vietnam. Indonesia's Mursyid Effendi deliberately kicked the ball into the Indonesia's own goal as a Thailand's attacker ran towards the ball.[18] FIFA fined both teams $40,000 for "violating the spirit of the game" while Effendi was banned from international association football for a lifetime. Indonesia then lost to Singapore in the semi-finals.[19]

2012 and 2015–16 suspensions

In March 2012, PSSI received a warning for the divided state of Indonesian football, whereby two separate leagues existed: the rebel Super League (ISL), which isn't recognised by PSSI or FIFA, and the Premier League (IPL). The National Sports Committee (KONI) encouraged PSSI to work collaboratively with Indonesian Football Savior Committee (KPSI) officials to rectify the situation but KONI chairman Tono Suratman stated in March 2012 that KONI will take over the beleaguered PSSI if matters are not improved.[20] FIFA did not state whether Indonesia would face suspension, but on 20 March 2012, FIFA made an announcement. In the lead-up to 20 March 2012, PSSI struggled to resolve the situation and looked to its annual congress for a final solution.[21] PSSI was given until 15 June 2012 to settle the issues at stake, notably the control of the breakaway league; failing this, the case was to be referred to the FIFA Emergency Committee for suspension.[22] FIFA eventually set a new 1 December 2012 deadline and in the two weeks preceding the deadline, three out of four PSSI representatives withdrew from the joint committee, citing frustrations in dealing with KPSI representatives. However, FIFA stated that it would only issue a punishment to Indonesian football after the Indonesian national squad finished its involvement in the 2012 AFF Championship.[23]

In 2013, the president of PSSI Djohar Arifin Husin signed a Memorandum of understanding (MoU) with La Nyalla Matalitti (KPSI-PSSI) that was initiated by FIFA and the AFC through the Asian Football Confederation's Task Force. Since then, the control of Indonesia Super League was taken by Joint committee to remain manageable by PT Liga Indonesia until the establishment of a new professional competition by the committee.[24] This means the Indonesian players from ISL were able to play and join the national team. The PSSI called players from both football leagues, ISL and IPL to fortify the national team for Asian Cup qualifier of 2015. On 7 January 2013, PSSI announced a lists of 51 players from both side football leagues regardless of whether players from the breakaway Indonesia Super League (ISL) would make an appearance, allegedly ISL clubs were reluctant to release players because they doubted Djohar's leadership.[25]

On 18 March 2013, PSSI held a congress at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Both parties, PSSI and KPSI (breakaway group) solved their differences in four contentious points; such as; Reunification of two leagues; Revision of the PSSI Statutes; Reinstatement of the four expelled PSSI Executive Committee members La Nyalla Mattalitti, Roberto Rouw, Erwin Dwi Budiawan and Toni Apriliani; and agreement of all parties to the Memorandum of Understanding from 7 June 2012 on the list of delegates to the PSSI Congress based on the list of the Solo Congress of July 2011. The new PSSI called 58 players from both sides leagues (ISL and IPL) for the national squad. Rahmad Darmawan returned as the caretaker coach for the senior team and his friend, Jacksen F. Tiago was also in-charge as the assistant coach. Both Rahmat and Jaksen trimmed the 58 players initially called for national training to 28. The list would then be trimmed again to just 23 players for the Saudi Arabia match. Victor Igbonefo, Greg Nwokolo and Sergio van Dijk the three naturalised players were on the final list.[26] On 23 March 2013, Indonesia was defeated 1–2 by Saudi Arabia at home. Boaz Solossa gave Indonesia the first goal at their campaign at AFC Asian Cup qualification; the home team started with the goal in the sixth minute but the Saudi Side fought back with the equaliser from Yahya Al-Shehri in the 14th minute before Yousef Al-Salem the scored what turned out to be the winner on 56th minute.[27]

The Indonesian Football Association was suspended by FIFA because of government interference in the Southeast Asian country's national league on 30 May 2015. The ban took effect immediately and meant that Indonesia would not be eligible to compete in the next round of qualifiers for the 2018 World Cup and 2019 Asian Cup, starting less than two weeks later. FIFA took action against Indonesia following a row between local government and the football association which has resulted in the cancellation of the domestic competition.[28] The suspension was lifted at the 66th FIFA Congress.[29] By then, hurried perpetration was done for Indonesia in order to get in touch for the upcoming 2016 AFF Championship where Indonesia eventually reached the final and once again fell to Thailand in process.[30]

2017–2019

Some weeks after finishing second in the ASEAN Football Championship, PSSI held a congress on 8 January 2017 in efforts to sign Luis Milla to handle their senior and U-22 team. Prior to the 2018 AFF Championship, Milla departed without any explanations, causing angers among Indonesian supporters.[31] Indonesia crashed out from the group stage in 2018 AFF Championship led to the sacking of Bima Sakti.[32] In order to prepare for the 2022 World Cup campaign, Indonesia signed Simon McMenemy with hope that his successful tenure with the Philippines could reinvigorate Indonesia's performance especially when Indonesia was grouped with three Southeast Asian rivals Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam alongside UAE.[33] Indonesia lost all four matches including a 2–3 home defeat to Malaysia despite having taken a 2–1 lead prior followed by a home loss to Vietnam for the first time ever in any competitive tournaments. On 6 November 2019, PSSI decided to sack McMenemy over the national team's deteriorating performance.[34] Indonesia traveled to Malaysia and lost 0–2 to its rival and was officially eliminated from the 2022 World Cup qualification.[35]

2021–present

Following the failure to qualify for World Cup, PSSI appointed Shin Tae-yong as coach of Indonesia with hope to reinvigorate the team for the upcoming 2023 AFC Asian Cup qualification using the success of Park Hang-seo in Vietnam as an evidence for their appointment.[36]

Under the management of Shin Tae-yong, the majority of senior teams were reshuffled and have many young players of whom majority were from under-23. Indonesia made it to the 2020 AFF Championship final with an average players age of 23.

On the Asian Cup qualification, Indonesia shockingly defeated host, Kuwait, whom they have not defeated in 42 years, to the surprise of many people. Indonesia successfully qualified for the upcoming 2023 AFC Asian Cup after a 16-years absence.

Kit

Indonesia's football jersey with numbers 17 in 1981
Indonesia's football jersey with numbers 17 in 1981

During the Dutch colonial era, the team competed as Dutch East Indies in international matches and played in an orange jersey, the national colour of the Netherlands. There are no official documents about the team's kit, only several black-and-white photos from the match against Hungary in the 1938 FIFA World Cup; but unofficial documents stated that the kit consisted of an orange jersey, white shorts and light blue socks.[37] Since Indonesia's independence, the kit consists red and white, the colours of the country's flag. A combination of green and white has also been used for the away kits and was used for the team's participation in the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, until the mid-1980s.[38]

The 2010–2012 home kit became an issue when the team played against an opponent wearing an all-white uniform, since the socks were white instead of usual red. The solution was solved with a red-green-green combination (for away games) with green shorts and socks taken from the away kit, or initially an all-red uniform (for home games). After a home defeat in the 2014 World Cup third round qualifier match against Bahrain on 6 September 2011, the red shorts used (with green application) were scrapped after its first outing and never used again. The red socks had white application on it, different from the red socks with green application worn during training. The combination of red-white-red used some times in the future as the alternate home kit, for example on the subsequent home matches of the qualifiers against Qatar and Iran later that year.

On 12 November 2012, a week prior to the start of the 2012 AFF Suzuki Cup, Indonesia released its new home and away kits, again designed by Nike. The home kit returned to the red-white-red combination, as was the case in 2008, and the away kit consisted of a white-green-white combination. "The green colour brings a historical touch as the national team in the 1950s wore green shirts," Nike Indonesia marketing manager, Nino Priyambodo, said. "We hope it can inspire the national team for better performances in the future."[39] The alternate shorts for this home kit were red shorts and green away shorts, while the away kit's alternate shorts were white shorts with red numbering from the default home shorts.

On 31 October 2014, Nike released Indonesia's home and away kits for the 2014 AFF Championship. The home shirt was red with white Nike logo and lines and green accent on the shoulders and tip of the sleeves, restricted by the white lines. The home kit consisted of red-white-red combination. The away shirt is white with green collar, sleeve tips, and Nike logo. The away kit consisted of white-green-white combination.[40] Due to the FIFA sanction imposed in 2015, the kits were used again in the 2016 AFF Championship and up until 2018 with two different fonts other than the 2014 Nike fonts used earlier.

On 31 May 2018, Nike released Indonesia's new home and away kits. The home shirt is red with golden Nike logo inspired from the country's national emblem, the Garuda Pancasila. The home kit consists of red-white-red combination. The away shirt is white with green Nike logo. The away kit consists of white-green-white combination.[41]

Since 2020 Indonesia has been using new apparel from local brand Mills. The home kit consists of red-white-red combination with a silhouette in the front of the kit. The away kit consists white-green-white combination with a green horizontal strip across the front of the kit and a smaller white horizontal strip across the green strip. The third kit consists all black combination with golden strips and a silhouette in the front of the kit.[42]

Indonesia also wear another apparel when they competed in international sport event such as Asian Games 2018 and Southeast Asian Games. In those events Indonesia wear Li-Ning in case wear Nike or current apparel Mills. This is due to Asian Games and SEA Games are multi-sports event which all of whose contingents are under the Indonesian National Olympic Committee (NOC).[43]

Stadium

Gelora Bung Karno Main Stadium (main home stadium) for the Indonesia national football team.
Gelora Bung Karno Main Stadium (main home stadium) for the Indonesia national football team.

Indonesia has played home matches at Gelora Bung Karno Stadium located within the Gelora Bung Karno Sports Complex, Gelora, Tanah Abang, Central Jakarta - Indonesia, the main home stadium for the Indonesia national football team. The stadium is mostly used for association football matches and has a seating capacity of over 77,193 spectators, though it has been able to hold more than that during special matches. The final of the 2007 AFC Asian Cup was held in this stadium. This stadium was once the 7th largest association football stadium in the world.

Jakarta International Stadium became the occasional home stadium for the Indonesia national football team, is a retractable roof football stadium under construction in Tanjung Priok, Jakarta - Indonesia. Once completed, it will be the home ground for the occasional home of the Indonesia national football team, after an agreement between PSSI and PT JAKPRO to use the facility.[44] The stadium will be able to host 82,000 spectators, making it the largest stadium in Indonesia.[45][46]

Media coverage

Indonesia team qualifiers for the 2022 FIFA World Cup (second round only) and 2023 AFC Asian Cup are broadcast by free-to-air public television network TVRI, Emtek's free-to-air television network SCTV (from 2021),[47] and Polytron's premium multiplatform network Mola TV, through 2022.[48]

Commercial MNC Media also shows the national team but from 2020 until 2023, MNC only covering the national team matches at 2021 AFF Championship and 2023 AFC Asian Cup (had qualified to the finals tournament) due to MNC-Lagardère[note 1] and Football Marketing Asia (AFC Asian Cup) broadcasting rights partnership contract.[49][50] Unlike TVRI, SCTV, and Mola TV, the three televisions bought the rights from PSSI only.

Results and fixtures

Main article: Indonesia national football team results (2020–present)

Matches in the last 12 months, and future scheduled matches

  Win   Draw   Loss

2021

7 October 2021 (2021-10-07) Asian Cup qualification PO Indonesia  2–1  Chinese Taipei Buriram, Thailand
19:00 UTC+7
  • Rumakiek 16'
  • Evan 48'
Report Stadium: Buriram Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Payam Heidari (Iran)
11 October 2021 (2021-10-11) Asian Cup qualification PO Chinese Taipei  0–3  Indonesia Buriram, Thailand
20:00 UTC+7 Report
Stadium: Buriram Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Mohammad Arafah (Jordan)
16 November 2021 (2021-11-16) FIFA Friendly Afghanistan  1–0  Indonesia Antalya, Turkey
17:00 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Gloria Sports Arena
25 November 2021 (2021-11-25) Friendly Indonesia  4–1  Myanmar Antalya, Turkey
17:30 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Emirhan Sports Complex
9 December 2021 AFF Championship GS Indonesia  4–2  Cambodia Bishan, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: Bishan Stadium
Referee: Yaqoob Abdul Baki (Oman)
12 December 2021 AFF Championship GS Laos  1–5  Indonesia Bishan, Singapore
17:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: Bishan Stadium
Attendance: 207
Referee: Kim Hee-gon (South Korea)
15 December 2021 AFF Championship GS Indonesia  0–0  Vietnam Bishan, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: Bishan Stadium
Attendance: 928
Referee: Kim Dae-yong (South Korea)
19 December 2021 AFF Championship GS Malaysia  1–4  Indonesia Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 7,082
Referee: Ammar Ebrahim Mahfoodh (Bahrain)
22 December 2021 AFF Championship SF Singapore  1–1  Indonesia Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 9,952
Referee: Kim Hee-gon (South Korea)
25 December 2021 AFF Championship SF Indonesia  4–2 (a.e.t.)  Singapore Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 9,982
Referee: Kassem Matar Al-Hatmi (Oman)
29 December 2021 AFF Championship Final Indonesia  0–4  Thailand Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 6,290
Referee: Shukri Al-Hunfush (Saudi Arabia)

2022

1 January 2022 AFF Championship Final Thailand  2–2  Indonesia Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 7,429
Referee: Ahmed Faisal Al-Ali (Jordan)
27 January 2022 FIFA Friendly Indonesia  4–1  Timor-Leste Gianyar, Indonesia
20:00 UTC+8
Report
Stadium: Kapten I Wayan Dipta Stadium
Referee: Sance Lawita (Indonesia)
30 January 2022 FIFA Friendly Timor-Leste  0–3  Indonesia Gianyar, Indonesia
20:00 UTC+8 Report Stadium: Kapten I Wayan Dipta Stadium
Referee: Aprisman Aranda (Indonesia)
1 June 2022 (2022-06-01) FIFA Friendly Indonesia  0–0  Bangladesh Soreang, Indonesia
20:30 UTC+7 Report Stadium: Jalak Harupat Stadium
Attendance: 8,615
Referee: Yudi Nurcahya (Indonesia)
8 June 2022 (2022-06-08) Asian Cup qualification R3 Kuwait  1–2  Indonesia Kuwait City, Kuwait
19:15 UTC+3
Report
Stadium: Jaber Al-Ahmad International Stadium
Attendance: 6,100
Referee: Nasrullo Kabirov (Tajikistan)
11 June 2022 (2022-06-11) Asian Cup qualification R3 Indonesia  0–1  Jordan Kuwait City, Kuwait
23:15 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Jaber Al-Ahmad International Stadium
Attendance: 2,410
Referee: Yaqoob Abdul Baki (Oman)
14 June 2022 (2022-06-14) Asian Cup qualification R3 Indonesia  7–0    Nepal Kuwait City, Kuwait
23:15 UTC+3
Report Stadium: Jaber Al-Ahmad International Stadium
Attendance: 3,145
Referee: Hussein Abo Yehia (Lebanon)

Coaching staff

As of 18 January 2022
Position Name
Technical director Indra Sjafri
Head coach Shin Tae-yong
Assistant coach Choi In-cheol
Dženan Radončić
Nova Arianto
Goalkeeper coach Kim Bong-soo
Fitness coach Shin Sang-gyu
Match analyst Kim Jong-jin
Doctor Syarif Alwi
Ahmad Nizar
Physiotherapist Asep Azis
Denny Shulton
Interpreter Jeong Seok-seo
Yoo Jae-hoon

Coaching history

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were called up for the 2023 AFC Asian Cup Qualification on 8–14 June 2022.[53]

Caps and goals are accurate as of 14 June 2022, after the match against    Nepal.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Nadeo Argawinata (1997-03-09) 9 March 1997 (age 25) 14 0 Indonesia Bali United
20 1GK Syahrul Fadil (1995-10-26) 26 October 1995 (age 26) 2 0 Indonesia Persikabo 1973
22 1GK Adi Satryo (2001-07-07) 7 July 2001 (age 20) 1 0 Indonesia Persik Kediri

2 2DF Alfeandra Dewangga (2001-06-28) 28 June 2001 (age 20) 14 0 Indonesia PSIS Semarang
3 2DF Edo Febriansah (1997-07-25) 25 July 1997 (age 24) 7 0 Indonesia RANS Nusantara
4 2DF Elkan Baggott (2002-10-23) 23 October 2002 (age 19) 10 2 England Ipswich Town
5 2DF Rizky Ridho (2001-11-21) 21 November 2001 (age 20) 13 0 Indonesia Persebaya Surabaya
12 2DF Pratama Arhan (2001-12-21) 21 December 2001 (age 20) 20 3 Japan Tokyo Verdy
14 2DF Asnawi Mangkualam (1999-10-04) 4 October 1999 (age 22) 21 1 South Korea Ansan Greeners
16 2DF Koko Ari (2000-01-09) 9 January 2000 (age 22) 2 0 Indonesia Persebaya Surabaya
19 2DF Fachruddin Aryanto (captain) (1989-02-19) 19 February 1989 (age 33) 50 3 Indonesia Madura United

6 3MF Terens Puhiri (1996-10-13) 13 October 1996 (age 25) 2 1 Indonesia Borneo Samarinda
7 3MF Marselino Ferdinan (2004-09-09) 9 September 2004 (age 17) 5 1 Indonesia Persebaya Surabaya
8 3MF Witan Sulaeman (2001-10-08) 8 October 2001 (age 20) 18 6 Poland Lechia Gdańsk
11 3MF Saddil Ramdani (1999-01-02) 2 January 1999 (age 23) 11 1 Malaysia Sabah
13 3MF Rachmat Irianto (1999-09-03) 3 September 1999 (age 22) 20 3 Indonesia Persib Bandung
15 3MF Ricky Kambuaya (1996-05-05) 5 May 1996 (age 26) 17 5 Indonesia Persib Bandung
17 3MF Syahrian Abimanyu (1999-04-25) 25 April 1999 (age 23) 9 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta
23 3MF Marc Klok (vice-captain) (1993-04-20) 20 April 1993 (age 29) 4 1 Indonesia Persib Bandung

9 4FW Dimas Drajad (1997-03-30) 30 March 1997 (age 25) 4 1 Indonesia Persikabo 1973
10 4FW Stefano Lilipaly (1990-01-10) 10 January 1990 (age 32) 27 3 Indonesia Borneo Samarinda
18 4FW Muhammad Rafli (1998-11-24) 24 November 1998 (age 23) 6 0 Indonesia Arema
21 4FW Irfan Jaya (1996-05-01) 1 May 1996 (age 26) 22 6 Indonesia Bali United

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Ernando Ari (2002-02-27) 27 February 2002 (age 20) 2 0 Indonesia Persebaya Surabaya v.  Bangladesh, 1 June 2022INJ
GK Muhammad Riyandi (2000-01-03) 3 January 2000 (age 22) 5 0 Indonesia Persis Solo 2020 AFF Championship
GK Cahya Supriadi (2003-02-11) 11 February 2003 (age 19) 0 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta v.  Myanmar, 25 November 2021
GK Aqil Savik (1999-01-17) 17 January 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Indonesia Bhayangkara v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE

DF Rizky Febrianto (1997-02-22) 22 February 1997 (age 25) 1 0 Indonesia Arema v.  Bangladesh, 1 June 2022
DF Rio Fahmi (2001-10-06) 6 October 2001 (age 20) 0 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta v.  Bangladesh, 1 June 2022
DF Achmad Figo (2001-12-25) 25 December 2001 (age 20) 2 0 Indonesia Arema v.  Timor-Leste, 30 January 2022
DF Bayu Fiqri (2001-08-10) 10 August 2001 (age 20) 1 0 Indonesia Persib Bandung v.  Timor-Leste, 30 January 2022
DF Victor Igbonefo (1985-10-10) 10 October 1985 (age 36) 14 0 Indonesia Persib Bandung 2020 AFF Championship
DF Ryuji Utomo (1995-07-01) 1 July 1995 (age 26) 3 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta 2020 AFF Championship
DF Marckho Sandy (1994-12-04) 4 December 1994 (age 27) 1 0 Indonesia PSS Sleman 2020 AFF Championship
DF Vava Yagalo (1993-04-21) 21 April 1993 (age 29) 0 0 Indonesia Persik Kediri v.  Afghanistan, 16 November 2021INJ
DF Miftah Sani (1995-09-19) 19 September 1995 (age 26) 1 0 Indonesia Dewa United v.  Chinese Taipei, 11 October 2021
DF Muhamad Firly (1999-07-16) 16 July 1999 (age 22) 0 0 Indonesia Barito Putera v.  Chinese Taipei, 11 October 2021
DF Johan Alfarizi (1990-05-25) 25 May 1990 (age 32) 3 0 Indonesia Arema v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021UNF
DF Rifad Marasabessy (1999-07-07) 7 July 1999 (age 22) 1 0 Indonesia Borneo Samarinda v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021WD
DF Arif Satria (1995-09-17) 17 September 1995 (age 26) 3 0 Indonesia RANS Nusantara v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
DF Dany Saputra (1991-01-01) 1 January 1991 (age 31) 0 0 Indonesia Persik Kediri v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE

MF Evan Dimas (1995-03-13) 13 March 1995 (age 27) 43 9 Indonesia Arema v.  Bangladesh, 1 June 2022INJ
MF Ramai Rumakiek (2002-04-19) 19 April 2002 (age 20) 12 3 Indonesia Persipura Jayapura v.  Timor-Leste, 30 January 2022
MF Sani Rizki (1998-01-07) 7 January 1998 (age 24) 2 0 Indonesia Bhayangkara v.  Timor-Leste, 30 January 2022
MF Yabes Roni (1995-02-06) 6 February 1995 (age 27) 6 0 Indonesia Bali United v.  Timor-Leste, 27 January 2022
MF Kadek Agung (1998-06-25) 25 June 1998 (age 23) 10 1 Indonesia Bali United 2020 AFF Championship
MF Ahmad Agung (1996-03-09) 9 March 1996 (age 26) 1 0 Indonesia Bali United 2020 AFF Championship
MF Adam Alis (1993-12-19) 19 December 1993 (age 28) 6 0 Indonesia Arema v.  Chinese Taipei, 11 October 2021
MF Gunansar Mandowen (2000-11-14) 14 November 2000 (age 21) 0 0 Indonesia Persipura Jayapura v.  Chinese Taipei, 11 October 2021
MF Febri Hariyadi (1996-02-19) 19 February 1996 (age 26) 15 0 Indonesia Persib Bandung v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
MF Septian David (1996-09-02) 2 September 1996 (age 25) 12 1 Indonesia PSIS Semarang v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
MF Hendro Siswanto (1990-03-12) 12 March 1990 (age 32) 6 0 Indonesia Borneo Samarinda v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
MF Genta Alparedo (2001-10-07) 7 October 2001 (age 20) 1 0 Indonesia Semen Padang v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
MF Braif Fatari (2002-04-09) 9 April 2002 (age 20) 1 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
MF Feby Eka Putra (1999-02-12) 12 February 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Indonesia Dewa United v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE
MF Luthfi Kamal (1999-03-01) 1 March 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Indonesia Barito Putera v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE

FW Egy Maulana (2000-07-07) 7 July 2000 (age 21) 11 3 Unattached v.  Bangladesh, 1 June 2022INJ
FW Irfan Jauhari (2001-01-31) 31 January 2001 (age 21) 0 0 Indonesia Persis Solo v.  Bangladesh, 1 June 2022INJ
FW Dedik Setiawan (1994-06-27) 27 June 1994 (age 27) 15 0 Indonesia Arema v.  Timor-Leste, 30 January 2022
FW Ronaldo Kwateh (2004-10-19) 19 October 2004 (age 17) 2 0 Indonesia Madura United v.  Timor-Leste, 30 January 2022
FW Hanis Sagara (1999-09-08) 8 September 1999 (age 22) 5 0 Indonesia Arema v.  Timor-Leste, 27 January 2022
FW Kushedya Yudo (1993-07-06) 6 July 1993 (age 28) 10 0 Indonesia Arema 2020 AFF Championship
FW Ezra Walian (1997-10-22) 22 October 1997 (age 24) 9 3 Indonesia Persib Bandung 2020 AFF Championship
FW Taufik Hidayat (1999-12-16) 16 December 1999 (age 22) 0 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta v.  Chinese Taipei, 11 October 2021
FW Osvaldo Haay (1998-05-17) 17 May 1998 (age 24) 6 0 Indonesia Persija Jakarta v.  Chinese Taipei, 7 October 2021PRE

Notes
  • PRE = Preliminary squad
  • SUS = Suspended
  • INJ = Withdrew from the roster due to an injury
  • UNF = Withdrew from the roster due to unfit condition
  • RET = Retired from the national team
  • WD = Withdrew from the roster for non-injury related reasons

Individual records

As of 14 June 2022[54]

Most appearances

Rank Name Caps Goals Career
1 Abdul Kadir 111 70 1965–1979
2 Iswadi Idris 97 55 1968–1980
3 Bambang Pamungkas 85 37 1999–2012
4 Kainun Waskito 80 31 1967–1977
5 Jacob Sihasale 70 23 1966–1974
6 Firman Utina 66 5 2001–2014
7 Ponaryo Astaman 61 2 2003–2013
Soetjipto Soentoro 61 32 1965–1970
9 Hendro Kartiko 60 0 1996–2011
10 Kurniawan Dwi Yulianto 59 33 1995–2005

Top goalscorers

Rank Name Goals Caps Average Career
1 Abdul Kadir 70 111 0.63 1965–1979
2 Iswadi Idris 55 97 0.57 1968–1980
3 Bambang Pamungkas 37 85 0.44 1999–2012
4 Kurniawan Dwi Yulianto 33 59 0.56 1995–2005
5 Soetjipto Soentoro 32 61 0.52 1965–1970
6 Kainun Waskito 31 80 0.39 1967–1977
7 Risdianto 25 56 0.45 1971–1981
8 Jacob Sihasale 23 70 0.33 1966–1974
9 Rochy Putiray 17 44 0.39 1990–2004
10 Budi Sudarsono 16 47 0.34 2001–2010

Captains

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

Main article: Indonesia at the FIFA World Cup

Final Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
as Dutch East Indies
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Did not enter
Italy 1934
France 1938 Round of 16 15th 1 0 0 1 0 6 Squad Automatically qualified
as  Indonesia
Brazil 1950 Withdrew Withdrew
Switzerland 1954 Did not enter Did not enter
Sweden 1958 Withdrew during qualification 3 1 1 1 5 4
Chile 1962 Withdrew Withdrew
England 1966 Did not enter Did not enter
Mexico 1970
West Germany 1974 Did not qualify 6 1 2 3 6 13
Argentina 1978 4 1 1 2 7 7
Spain 1982 8 2 2 4 5 14
Mexico 1986 8 4 1 3 9 10
Italy 1990 6 1 3 2 5 10
United States 1994 8 1 0 7 6 19
France 1998 6 1 4 1 11 6
South Korea Japan 2002 6 4 0 2 16 7
Germany 2006 6 2 1 3 8 12
South Africa 2010 2 0 0 2 1 11
Brazil 2014 8 1 1 6 8 30
Russia 2018 Disqualified due to FIFA suspension Disqualified
Qatar 2022 Did not qualify 8 0 1 7 5 27
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Round of 16 15th 1 0 0 1 0 6 79 19 17 43 92 170

Olympic Games

Final Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
1900 to 1952 Did not enter
Australia 1956 Quarter-finals 7th 2 0 1 1 0 4 Squad Automatically qualified
Italy 1960 Did not qualify 2 0 0 2 2 6
Japan 1964 Withdrew
Mexico 1968 Did not qualify 4 1 1 2 4 5
West Germany 1972 4 2 0 2 8 6
Canada 1976 4 2 1 1 11 5
Soviet Union 1980 5 1 0 4 7 12
United States 1984 8 0 3 5 3 14
South Korea 1988 4 1 0 3 3 8
Total Quarter-finals 7th 2 0 1 1 0 4 31 7 5 19 38 56

AFC Asian Cup

Main article: Indonesia at the AFC Asian Cup

Final Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
Hong Kong 1956 Withdrew Withdrew before playing any matches
South Korea 1960
Israel 1964
Iran 1968 Did not qualify 4 1 1 2 10 6
Thailand 1972 5 3 0 2 12 6
Iran 1976 4 1 1 2 3 5
Kuwait 1980 3 0 0 3 3 10
Singapore 1984 5 3 0 2 6 5
Qatar 1988 3 1 1 1 1 4
Japan 1992 3 1 1 1 3 4
United Arab Emirates 1996 Group stage 11th 3 0 1 2 4 8 Squad 2 1 1 0 7 1
Lebanon 2000 Group stage 11th 3 0 1 2 0 7 Squad 4 3 1 0 18 5
China 2004 Group stage 11th 3 1 0 2 3 9 Squad 6 3 1 2 9 13
IndonesiaMalaysiaThailandVietnam 2007 Group stage 11th 3 1 0 2 3 4 Squad Qualified as co-hosts
Qatar 2011 Did not qualify 6 0 3 3 3 6
Australia 2015 6 0 1 5 2 8
United Arab Emirates 2019 Disqualified due to FIFA suspension Disqualified
2023 Qualified 13 4 1 8 19 30
Total Group stage 11th 12 2 2 8 10 28 64 21 12 31 96 103

Asian Games

Asian Games
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
India 1951 Quarter-finals 6th 1 0 0 1 0 3
Philippines 1954 Fourth place 4th 4 2 0 2 15 12
Japan 1958 Bronze medal 3rd 5 4 0 1 15 7
Indonesia 1962 Group stage 5th 3 2 0 1 9 3
Thailand 1966 Quarter-finals 5th 5 2 2 1 8 4
Thailand 1970 Quarter-finals 5th 5 1 2 2 4 7
Iran 1974 Did not participate
Thailand 1978
India 1982
South Korea 1986 Fourth place 4th 6 1 2 3 4 14
China 1990 Did not participate
Japan 1994
Thailand 1998
Total Bronze medal 3rd 29 12 6 11 55 50

AFF Championship

AFF Championship
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
Singapore 1996 Fourth place 4th 6 3 1 2 18 9 Squad
Vietnam 1998 Third place 3rd 5 2 1 2 15 10 Squad
Thailand 2000 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 0 2 13 10 Squad
Indonesia Singapore 2002 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 3 0 22 7 Squad
Malaysia Vietnam 2004 Runners-up 2nd 8 4 1 3 24 8 Squad
Singapore Thailand 2007 Group stage 5th 3 1 2 0 6 4 Squad
Indonesia Thailand 2008 Semi-finals 4th 5 2 0 3 8 5 Squad
Indonesia Vietnam 2010 Runners-up 2nd 7 6 0 1 17 6 Squad
Malaysia Thailand 2012 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 3 4 Squad
Singapore Vietnam 2014 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 7 7 Squad
Myanmar Philippines 2016 Runners-up 2nd 7 3 2 2 12 13 Squad
ASEAN 2018 Group stage 7th 4 1 1 2 5 6 Squad
Singapore 2020 Runners-up 2nd 8 4 3 1 20 13 Squad
Total Runners-up 2nd 70 34 16 20 170 102

Southeast Asian Games

Southeast Asian Games
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
1959 to 1975 Did not participate
Malaysia 1977 Fourth place 4th 4 2 2 0 8 3
Indonesia 1979 Silver medal 2nd 6 2 2 2 6 5
Philippines 1981 Bronze medal 3rd 4 3 0 1 5 2
Singapore 1983 Group stage 5th 3 1 1 1 3 7
Thailand 1985 Fourth place 4th 4 0 1 3 1 10
Indonesia 1987 Gold medal 1st 4 3 1 0 7 1
Malaysia 1989 Bronze medal 3rd 5 2 1 2 12 5
Philippines 1991 Gold medal 1st 5 3 2 0 5 1
Singapore 1993 Fourth place 4th 5 2 1 2 6 6
Thailand 1995 Group stage 6th 4 2 0 2 14 3
Indonesia 1997 Silver medal 2nd 6 4 2 0 16 6
Brunei 1999 Bronze medal 3rd 6 3 2 1 11 2
Total Gold medal 1st 56 27 15 14 94 51

Exhibition

Exhibition game
Year Tournament Round Position
1957 Malaysia Pestabola Merdeka Runner-up 2nd
1958 Malaysia Pestabola Merdeka Semifinal 3rd
1961 Bangladesh Aga Khan Gold Cup Champions 1st
1962 Malaysia Pestabola Merdeka Champions 1st
1962 South Vietnam South Vietnam Independence Cup Runner-up 2nd
1968 Thailand King's Cup Champions 1st
1969 Malaysia Pestabola Merdeka Champions 1st
1969 Thailand King's Cup Runner-up 2nd
1972 Indonesia Jakarta Anniversary Tournament Champions 1st
1972 Singapore Pesta Sukan Cup Champions 1st
1972 South Korea President's Cup Runner-up 2nd
1973 Indonesia Jakarta Anniversary Tournament Runner-up 2nd
1974 Indonesia Jakarta Anniversary Tournament Runner-up 2nd
1978 Indonesia Jakarta Anniversary Tournament Runner-up 2nd
1980 South Korea President's Cup Runner-up 2nd
1982 Singapore Merlion Cup Semifinal 3rd
1984 Thailand King's Cup Runner-up 2nd
1984 Singapore Merlion Cup Group stage 7th
1986 Indonesia Indonesian Independence Cup Runner-up 2nd
1987 Indonesia Indonesian Independence Cup Champions 1st
1994 Indonesia Indonesian Independence Cup Runner-up 2nd
1997 Malaysia Dunhill Cup Malaysia Group stage 5th
2000 Indonesia Indonesian Independence Cup Champions 1st
2006 Malaysia Pestabola Merdeka Runner-up 2nd
2008 Indonesia Indonesian Independence Cup Champions 1st
2008 Myanmar Myanmar Grand Royal Challenge Cup Runner-up 2nd
2012 Indonesia SCTV Cup Runner-up 2nd
2012 State of Palestine Al Nakba Cup Semifinal 3rd

Head-to-head record

Main article: Indonesia national football team results

As of 14 June 2022[55][56][57]

  More wins   Wins equal losses   More losses

Opponent Pld W D L GF GA GD Confederation
 Afghanistan 2 0 0 2 2 4 −2 AFC
 Algeria 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 CAF
 Andorra 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 UEFA
 Australia 19 2 3 14 10 39 −29 AFC
 Bahrain 7 2 2 3 7 19 −12 AFC
 Bangladesh 8 5 2 1 14 5 9 AFC
 Bhutan 2 2 0 0 4 0 4 AFC
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 UEFA
 Brunei 11 7 2 2 34 4 30 AFC
 Bulgaria 3 0 1 2 0 6 −6 UEFA
 Cambodia 25 21 1 3 97 21 76 AFC
 Cameroon 2 0 1 1 0 1 −1 CAF
 Canada 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 CONCACAF
 China PR 19 2 4 13 14 42 −28 AFC
 Chinese Taipei 14 10 0 4 31 14 17 AFC
 Croatia 1 0 0 1 2 5 −3 UEFA
 Czech Republic[a] 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 UEFA
 Cuba 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 CONCACAF
 Denmark 1 0 0 1 0 9 −9 UEFA
 Dominican Republic 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CONCACAF
 East Germany 2 0 1 1 3 5 −2 UEFA
 Egypt 1 0 0 1 0 6 −6 CAF
 Estonia 2 0 1 1 0 3 −3 UEFA
 Fiji 3 0 3 0 3 3 0 OFC
 Ghana 2 0 0 2 0 6 −6 CAF
 Guinea 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 CAF
 Guyana 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 CONCACAF
 Hong Kong 23 13 5 5 47 34 13 AFC
 Hungary 1 0 0 1 0 6 −6 UEFA
 Iceland 1 0 0 1 1 4 −3 UEFA
 India 22 12 2 8 45 29 16 AFC
 Iran 6 1 1 4 6 11 −5 AFC
 Iraq 11 2 3 6 9 19 −10 AFC
 Israel 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 UEFA
 Jamaica 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 CONCACAF
 Japan 17 7 2 8 32 35 −3 AFC
 Jordan 6 0 0 6 3 17 −14 AFC
 Kenya 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1 CAF
 Kyrgyzstan 1 1 0 0 4 0 4 AFC
 Kuwait 7 2 3 2 8 12 −4 AFC
 Laos 10 9 1 0 45 9 36 AFC
 Liberia 2 1 0 1 3 3 0 CAF
 Libya 3 1 0 1 3 5 −2 CAF
 Liechtenstein 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1 UEFA
 Lithuania 2 0 1 1 2 6 −4 UEFA
 Malaysia 97 40 21 36 127 102 25 AFC
 Maldives 4 4 0 0 12 0 12 AFC
 Mali 1 1 0 0 3 2 1 CAF
 Malta 2 0 0 2 0 4 −4 UEFA
 Mauritius 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 CAF
 Moldova 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 UEFA
 Mongolia 4 4 0 0 13 2 11 AFC
 Morocco 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 CAF
 Myanmar 46 20 9 17 85 63 22 AFC
 Netherlands 4 0 0 4 2 19 −17 UEFA
   Nepal 2 2 0 0 9 0 9 AFC
 New Zealand 8 2 4 2 8 9 –1 OFC
 Nigeria 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CAF
 North Korea 9 0 1 8 4 25 −21 AFC
 Norway 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 UEFA
 Oman 6 2 1 3 7 6 1 AFC
 Pakistan 6 5 1 0 15 4 11 AFC
 Palestine 2 1 0 1 5 3 2 AFC
 Papua New Guinea 4 2 0 2 10 5 5 OFC
 Paraguay 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1 CONMEBOL
 Philippines 30 24 3 3 105 26 79 AFC
 Puerto Rico 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CONCACAF
 Qatar 9 1 2 6 10 23 −13 AFC
 Russia[b] 3 0 2 1 0 4 −4 UEFA
 Saudi Arabia 14 0 3 11 7 36 −29 AFC
 Senegal 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 CAF
 Serbia[c] 2 0 0 2 3 9 −6 UEFA
 Singapore 71 39 12 20 138 75 63 AFC
 South Africa 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 CAF
 South Korea 60 6 8 46 31 138 −107 AFC
 Sri Lanka 6 5 1 0 29 6 23 AFC
 Sweden 1 0 0 1 0 3 −3 UEFA
 Syria 5 1 0 4 3 15 −12 AFC
 Tanzania 1 1 0 0 3 1 2 CAF
 Thailand 96 32 17 47 120 166 −46 AFC
 Timor-Leste 6 6 0 0 21 2 19 AFC
 Turkmenistan 4 2 1 1 9 8 1 AFC
 United Arab Emirates 6 2 0 4 8 17 −9 AFC
 United States 2 1 1 0 9 7 2 CONCACAF
 Uruguay 3 1 0 2 5 11 −6 CONMEBOL
 Uzbekistan 2 0 1 1 1 4 −3 AFC
 Vanuatu 1 1 0 0 6 0 6 OFC
 Vietnam[d] 44 21 11 12 74 58 16 AFC
 Yemen[e] 6 2 4 0 7 3 4 AFC
 Zimbabwe 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CAF
Total 781 322 124 335 1325 1368 –43
  1. ^ Includes matches against  Czechoslovakia.
  2. ^ Includes matches against  Soviet Union.
  3. ^ Includes matches against  Yugoslavia and  Serbia and Montenegro.
  4. ^ Includes matches against  South Vietnam.
  5. ^ Includes matches against  South Yemen.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ AFC (until 2020) and AFF Championship

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