AFF Championship
Since-2018 symbol of AFF Championship.svg
Symbol used since the 2018 edition
Organising bodyAFF
Founded1996; 27 years ago (1996)
RegionSoutheast Asia
Number of teams10 (finals)
12 (eligible to enter qualification)
Current championsThailand Thailand (7th title)
Most successful team(s)Thailand Thailand (7 titles)
Websiteaffmitsubishielectriccup.com
2022 AFF Championship
Stadion Pakansari AFF 2016 Final.jpg
AFF Suzuki Cup 2016 final match first leg between Indonesia and Thailand
Tournaments

The ASEAN Football Federation Championship (less formally known as the AFF Championship or AFF Cup), currently known as the AFF Mitsubishi Electric Cup for sponsorship reasons, is the primary association football tournament organized by the ASEAN Football Federation (AFF) for men's national teams in Southeast Asia.

A biennial international association football competition, it is contested by the men's national teams of the AFF to determine the sub-continental champion of Southeast Asia. The competition has been held every two years since 1996 scheduled to be in the even-numbered year, except for 2007, and 2020 (which was postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic).

The AFF Championship title have been won by four national teams; Thailand have won seven titles, Singapore has four titles, Vietnam has two titles and Malaysia with one title. To date, Thailand and Singapore are the only teams in history to have won consecutive titles; Thailand in 2000 and 2002, 2014 and 2016 and also 2020 and 2022, and Singapore in 2004 and 2007. It is one of the most watched football tournaments in the region. The AFF Championship is also recognized as an 'A' international tournament by FIFA with FIFA ranking points being awarded since 1996.[1]

Since 2018, the championship winners would compete in the following AFF–EAFF Champions Trophy, against the winner of the EAFF E-1 Football Championship, the champions of East Asia, to determine the champions of East and Southeast Asia. Although having joined the AFF on 27 August 2013, Australia has not been allowed by the AFF to attend the AFF Championship.[2]

History

The first ASEAN Championship took place in 1996 with the six founding members of ASEAN Federation competing with four nations being invited that came in that region. The final saw Thailand become the first champions of ASEAN as they defeated Malaysia 1–0 in Singapore.[3] The top four nations automatically qualified through to the finals in the following edition. This meant the other six nations had to compete in qualifying for the remaining four spots. Myanmar, Singapore, Laos and Philippines all made it through to the main tournament.

Organisation

Sports marketing, media and event management firm, Lagardère Sports has been involved in the tournament since the inaugural edition in 1996.[citation needed]

Sponsorship

Founded as the Tiger Cup after Singapore-based Asia Pacific Breweries brand Tiger Beer, it sponsored the competition from the competition's inauguration in 1996 until the 2004 edition. After Asia Pacific Breweries withdrew as title sponsor, the competition was known simply as the AFF Championship for the 2007 edition. In 2008, Japanese auto-company Suzuki bought the naming rights for the competition, and the competition was named the AFF Suzuki Cup until the 2020 edition.[4] On 23 May 2022, AFF announced a new title sponsorship deal with Japanese company Mitsubishi Electric and the competition was named the AFF Mitsubishi Electric Cup starting in the 2022 edition.[5]

Period Sponsor Name
1996 to 2004 Tiger Beer Tiger Cup
2007 No title sponsor AFF Championship
2008 to 2020 Suzuki AFF Suzuki Cup
2022 to present Mitsubishi Electric AFF Mitsubishi Electric Cup

Format

From 2004, the knockout stage is played over two legs on a home-and-away format. Since the 2007 edition, there was no third place match; semi-finalists are listed in alphabetical order. The away goals rule has been applied for knockout stage since the 2010 edition.[a]

Starting with the 2018 edition, a new format was applied. The nine highest ranked teams would automatically qualify with the 10th and 11th ranked teams playing in a two-legged qualifier. The 10 teams were split in two groups of five and play a round robin system, with each team playing two home and two away fixtures. A draw was made to determine where the teams play while the format of the knockout round remained unchanged.[6]

Results

Year Host Final Third place playoff Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
1996  Singapore
Thailand
1–0
Malaysia

Vietnam
3–2
Indonesia
10
1998  Vietnam
Singapore
1–0
Vietnam

Indonesia
3–3 (a.e.t.)
(5–4 p)

Thailand
8
2000  Thailand
Thailand
4–1
Indonesia

Malaysia
3–0
Vietnam
9
2002  Indonesia
 Singapore

Thailand
2–2 (a.e.t.)
(4–2 p)

Indonesia

Vietnam
2–1
Malaysia
9
Year Group stage hosts Final Third place playoff or losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
2004  Malaysia
 Vietnam

Singapore
3–1
2–1

Indonesia

Malaysia
2–1
Myanmar
10
won 5–2 on aggregate
2007  Singapore
 Thailand

Singapore
2–1
1–1

Thailand
 Malaysia and  Vietnam 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
2008  Indonesia
 Thailand

Vietnam
2–1
1–1

Thailand
 Indonesia and  Singapore 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
2010  Indonesia
 Vietnam

Malaysia
3–0
1–2

Indonesia
 Philippines and  Vietnam 8
won 4–2 on aggregate
2012  Malaysia
 Thailand

Singapore
3–1
0–1

Thailand
 Malaysia and  Philippines 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
2014  Singapore
 Vietnam

Thailand
2–0
2–3

Malaysia
 Philippines and  Vietnam 8
won 4–3 on aggregate
2016  Myanmar
 Philippines

Thailand
1–2
2–0

Indonesia
 Myanmar and  Vietnam 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
Year Final Losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up
2018
Vietnam
2–2
1–0

Malaysia
 Philippines and  Thailand 10
won 3–2 on aggregate
Year Host Final Losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up
2020[b]  Singapore[c]
Thailand[d]
4–0
2–2

Indonesia[d]
 Singapore and  Vietnam 10
won 6–2 on aggregate
Year Final Losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up
2022
Thailand
2–2
1–0

Vietnam
 Indonesia and  Malaysia 10
won 3–2 on aggregate

Performances by country

Team Champions Runners-up
 Thailand 7 (1996, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2020, 2022) 3 (2007, 2008, 2012)
 Singapore 4 (1998, 2004, 2007, 2012)
 Vietnam 2 (2008, 2018) 2 (1998, 2022)
 Malaysia 1 (2010) 3 (1996, 2014, 2018)
 Indonesia 6 (2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2016, 2020)
Total 14 14

Participating nations

Team Singapore
1996
(10)
Vietnam
1998
(8)
Thailand
2000
(9)
Indonesia
Singapore
2002
(9)
Malaysia
Vietnam
2004
(10)
Singapore
Thailand
2007
(8)
Indonesia
Thailand
2008
(8)
Indonesia
Vietnam
2010
(8)
Malaysia
Thailand
2012
(8)
Singapore
Vietnam
2014
(8)
Myanmar
Philippines
2016
(8)
ASEAN
2018
(10)
Singapore
2020
(10)
ASEAN
2022
(10)
Total
 Australia Not an AFF member × × × × × 0
 Brunei GS × × × × × GS 2
 Cambodia GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 9
 Indonesia 4th 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd GS SF 2nd GS GS 2nd GS 2nd SF 14
 Laos GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 13
 Malaysia 2nd GS 3rd 4th 3rd SF GS 1st SF 2nd GS 2nd GS SF 14
 Myanmar GS GS GS GS 4th GS GS GS GS GS SF GS GS GS 14
 Philippines GS GS GS GS GS GS SF SF SF GS SF GS GS 13
 Singapore GS 1st GS GS 1st 1st SF GS 1st GS GS GS SF GS 14
 Thailand 1st 4th 1st 1st GS 2nd 2nd GS 2nd 1st 1st SF 1st 1st 14
 Timor-Leste Part of Indonesia × GS GS GS 3
 Vietnam 3rd 2nd 4th 3rd GS SF 1st SF GS SF SF 1st SF 2nd 14
Legend

Notes

Awards

Tournament Most Valuable Player Top goalscorer(s) Goals Young Player of the Tournament Fair play award
1996 Malaysia Zainal Abidin Hassan Thailand Natipong Sritong-In 7 N/A
(awarded in 2020)
 Brunei
1998 Vietnam Nguyễn Hồng Sơn Myanmar Myo Hlaing Win 4 Not awarded
2000 Thailand Kiatisuk Senamuang Indonesia Gendut Doni Christiawan
Thailand Worrawoot Srimaka
5  Malaysia
2002 Thailand Therdsak Chaiman Indonesia Bambang Pamungkas 8 Not awarded
2004 Singapore Lionel Lewis Indonesia Ilham Jaya Kesuma 7
2007 Singapore Noh Alam Shah Singapore Noh Alam Shah 10
2008 Vietnam Dương Hồng Sơn Indonesia Budi Sudarsono
Singapore Agu Casmir
Thailand Teerasil Dangda
4  Thailand
2010 Indonesia Firman Utina Malaysia Safee Sali 5  Philippines
2012 Singapore Shahril Ishak Thailand Teerasil Dangda 5  Malaysia
2014 Thailand Chanathip Songkrasin Malaysia Safiq Rahim 6  Vietnam
2016 Thailand Chanathip Songkrasin Thailand Teerasil Dangda 6  Thailand
2018 Vietnam Nguyễn Quang Hải Thailand Adisak Kraisorn 8  Malaysia
2020 Chanathip Songkrasin[d] Malaysia Safawi Rasid
Philippines Bienvenido Marañón
Chanathip Songkrasin[d]
Teerasil Dangda[d]
4 Pratama Arhan[d] Indonesia[d]
2022 Thailand Theerathon Bunmathan Thailand Teerasil Dangda
Vietnam Nguyễn Tiến Linh
6 Indonesia Marselino Ferdinan  Malaysia

Winning coaches

AFF Championship-winning coaches
Year Winning coaches National team
1996 Thailand Thawatchai Sartjakul  Thailand
1998 England Barry Whitbread  Singapore
2000 England Peter Withe  Thailand
2002 England Peter Withe  Thailand
2004 Serbia Radojko Avramović  Singapore
2007 Serbia Radojko Avramović  Singapore
2008 Portugal Henrique Calisto  Vietnam
2010 Malaysia K. Rajagopal  Malaysia
2012 Serbia Radojko Avramović  Singapore
2014 Thailand Kiatisuk Senamuang[1]  Thailand
2016 Thailand Kiatisuk Senamuang[1]  Thailand
2018 South Korea Park Hang-seo  Vietnam
2020 Brazil Alexandré Pölking Thailand[d]
2022 Brazil Alexandré Pölking  Thailand
Notes
  1. ^[1] - being the only person to win the competition as a player (1996, 2000, 2002) then coach (2014, 2016).

All-time ranking table

As of the 2022 edition
Rank Team Part Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Best finish
1  Thailand 14 86 54 20 12 188 96 +92 182 Champions (1996, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2020, 2022)
2  Vietnam 14 79 41 22 16 161 77 +84 145 Champions (2008, 2018)
3  Indonesia 14 76 38 17 21 189 129 +60 131 Runners-up (2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2016, 2020)
4  Malaysia 14 75 34 15 26 131 88 +43 117 Champions (2010)
5  Singapore 14 66 33 16 17 118 68 +50 115 Champions (1998, 2004, 2007, 2012)
6  Myanmar 14 50 15 8 27 62 110 –48 53 Semi-finalists (2004, 2016)
7  Philippines 13 48 11 4 33 55 60 –5 37 Semi-finalists (2010, 2012, 2014, 2018)
8  Cambodia 9 34 6 0 28 39 110 –71 18 Group stage (9 times)
9  Laos 13 45 2 6 37 32 170 –138 12 Group stage (13 times)
10  Brunei 2 8 1 0 7 3 37 –34 3 Group stage (1996, 2022)
11  Timor-Leste 3 12 0 0 12 6 50 –44 0 Group stage (2004, 2018, 2020)

Records and statistics

Overall top goalscorers

As of 2022 final
Rank Player Goals
1 Thailand Teerasil Dangda 25
2 Singapore Noh Alam Shah 17
3 Thailand Worrawoot Srimaka 15
Vietnam Lê Công Vinh
5 Vietnam Lê Huỳnh Đức 14
6 Thailand Adisak Kraisorn 13
Indonesia Kurniawan Dwi Yulianto
8 Indonesia Bambang Pamungkas 12
Thailand Kiatisuk Senamuang
10 Singapore Agu Casmir 11
11 Singapore Khairul Amri 10

Hat-tricks

Main article: List of AFF Championship hat-tricks

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Except the 2020 edition due to all matches being hosted in only venue.
  2. ^ Postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  3. ^ The 2020 AFF Championship was hosted in a centralized venue due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Southeast Asia. On 28 September 2021, it was announced that Singapore would host the tournament.[7]
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Due to non-compliance with conditions set by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), Thailand and Indonesia were not allowed to be represented by their national flags.[8][9] The sanctions took effect in October 2021.[10] Thailand is represented by its national team logo while Indonesia is represented by its coat of arms.

References

  1. ^ Isu Mata FIFA Ranking Dalam Sejarah Kejohanan Piala AFF (in Malay) - Football Tribe, 13 November 2016.
  2. ^ Bossi, Dominic (31 January 2019). "Socceroos seeking entrance into 2020 Suzuki Cup". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  3. ^ "About AFF". aseanfootball.org.
  4. ^ "Global News News.2008 | Global Suzuki". www.globalsuzuki.com. Retrieved 4 October 2022.
  5. ^ "AFF Announces Mitsubishi Electric As The New Title Sponsor Of AFF Mitsubishi Electric Cup 2022". www.affmitsubishielectriccup.com. Retrieved 24 May 2022.
  6. ^ "New format confirmed for AFF Suzuki Cup". Football Channel Asia. 14 March 2016. Archived from the original on 14 March 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016.
  7. ^ Noronha, Anselm (28 September 2021). "Singapore to host AFF Suzuki Cup 2020: Teams, how to watch & more | Goal.com". Goal.com. Retrieved 29 September 2021.
  8. ^ "Thailand loses right to host tournaments". Bangkok Post. Bangkok Post Public Co. Ltd. Retrieved 25 November 2021. The country has also been denied the right to display its national flag at any such events (international football events).
  9. ^ "Chairman Of PSSI: Regarding The Flag At AFF 2020, We Will Follow Whatever The Decision Is". VOI – Waktunya Merevolusi Pemberitaan. 24 November 2021. Retrieved 25 November 2021.
  10. ^ "WADA confirms non-compliance of five Anti-Doping Organizations (7 October 2021)". World Anti-Doping Agency. 7 October 2021. Retrieved 4 December 2021.