Colorado Republican Party
ChairpersonKristi Burton Brown
Senate LeaderJohn Cooke
House LeaderHugh McKean
Headquarters5950 S. Willow Drive, Suite 210 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111
Membership (2022)Increase957,063[1]
IdeologyConservatism
Fiscal conservatism
Social conservatism
Trumpism
Political positionRight-wing to far-right[2][3]
National affiliationRepublican Party
ColorsRed
U.S. Senate
0 / 2
U.S. House
3 / 7
Statewide offices
0 / 5
Colorado Senate
14 / 35
Colorado House of Representatives
24 / 65
Website
www.cologop.org

The Colorado Republican Party is the state affiliate of the Republican Party in the U.S. state of Colorado. The party's headquarters is located in Greenwood Village, Colorado. The state party chair is Kristi Burton Brown.

The Colorado Republican Party was dominant in 2002, but declined over the next 18 years. After the 2020 United States elections, the Colorado Republican Party was at its lowest electoral power since World War II. The decline has been attributed to various factors, including changing demographics, mismanaged campaign money, internal party divisions, a better organized Democratic Party, and the unpopularity of Donald Trump in the state.[4]

Recent history

Since 2016, the Colorado GOP have shifted more rightward in their political positions and have subsequently embraced Trumpism.[5][6]

Since Joe Biden defeated Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election, elements of the Colorado GOP and its voter base have espoused support for Trump's false claims of election fraud.[7][8][9] While top Colorado Republicans have defended Colorado's local elections, they have cast doubt on the validity of the election results in other states or stayed silent on Trump's allegations of fraud.[10] On December 7, 2020, a group of Republicans requested to the Speaker of the House KC Becker that a committee be formed on "election integrity" to conduct a audit of the Dominion Voting Systems used in Colorado in spite of no evidence of issues. The request was rejected, with Becker criticizing it as "a dangerous stunt" and a promotion of "debunked conspiracy theories."[11]

Later in December, Republicans tried to utilize the Legislative Audit Committee in an effort to call for an audit of Colorado's election, citing claims of election irregularities despite there being no evidence of widespread fraud. On December 15, the committee found no evidence of fraud and Republican-led motions to launch an audit of the Secretary of State's Office were defeated.[12] The efforts were criticized as being partisan and a misuse of the committee's purpose.[13][12] Also in December, Colorado congressional Republicans supported a lawsuit aimed to overturn the election results.[14] On January 6, 2021, congressional Republicans from Colorado objected to certify the election results, with Lauren Boebert and Doug Lamborn objecting to certify the results.[15][16]

In 2021, while testifying under oath in court in relation to a lawsuit, the leaders of a fringe group revealed that chairwoman Kristi Burton Brown served as president to their organization, FEC United, a far-right group with a militia arm that has promoted conspiracy theories surrounding the 2020 elections, COVID, and QAnon. According to the testimony, Brown was president of the group from November 2020 while serving as vice-chair of the Colorado GOP and later left to run for the chair position for the state GOP in early 2021.[17][18]

During the 2022 legislative session, fifteen Republican members of the state senate voted in favor of unsuccessful amendments to a resolution on voting rights by thanking the pro-Trump rioters that stormed the Capitol and to decertify the 2020 presidential election.[19][20]

Current elected officials

Ken Buck
Ken Buck

After the 2020 elections, the Colorado Republican Party controls one statewide office and holds minorities in the Colorado Senate and House of Representatives. Republicans also hold a 3-4 minority in the state's U.S. House delegation.

Members of Congress

U.S. Senate

Both of Colorado's U.S. Senate seats have been held by Democrats since 2021. Cory Gardner was the last Republican to represent Colorado in the U.S. Senate. First elected in 2014, Gardner lost his bid for a second term in 2020 to John Hickenlooper who has held the seat since.

U.S. House of Representatives

Statewide offices

Legislative leadership

Election results

Presidential

Colorado Republican Party presidential election results
Election Presidential Ticket Votes Vote % Electoral votes Result
1876 Rutherford B. Hayes/William A. Wheeler No popular vote
3 / 3
Won
1880 James A. Garfield/Chester A. Arthur 27,450 51.26%
3 / 3
Won
1884 James G. Blaine/John A. Logan 39,514 54.25%
3 / 3
Lost
1888 Benjamin Harrison/Levi P. Morton 50,772 55.22%
3 / 3
Won
1892 Benjamin Harrison/Whitelaw Reid 38,620 41.13%
0 / 4
Lost
1896 William McKinley/Garret Hobart 26,271 13.86%
0 / 4
Won
1900 William McKinley/Theodore Roosevelt 93,072 42.04%
0 / 4
Won
1904 Theodore Roosevelt/Charles W. Fairbanks 134,661 55.26%
5 / 5
Won
1908 William Howard Taft/James S. Sherman 123,693 46.88%
0 / 5
Won
1912 William Howard Taft/Nicholas M. Butler 58,386 21.88%
0 / 6
Lost
1916 Charles E. Hughes/Charles W. Fairbanks 102,308 34.75%
0 / 6
Lost
1920 Warren G. Harding/Calvin Coolidge 173,248 59.32%
6 / 6
Won
1924 Calvin Coolidge/Charles G. Dawes 195,171 57.02%
6 / 6
Won
1928 Herbert Hoover/Charles Curtis 253,872 64.72%
6 / 6
Won
1932 Herbert Hoover/Charles Curtis 189,617 41.43%
0 / 6
Lost
1936 Alf Landon/Frank Knox 181,267 37.09%
0 / 6
Lost
1940 Wendell Willkie/Charles L. McNary 279,576 50.92%
6 / 6
Lost
1944 Thomas E. Dewey/John W. Bricker 268,731 53.21%
6 / 6
Lost
1948 Thomas E. Dewey/Earl Warren 239,714 46.52%
0 / 6
Lost
1952 Dwight D. Eisenhower/Richard Nixon 379,782 60.27%
6 / 6
Won
1956 Dwight D. Eisenhower/Richard Nixon 394,479 59.49%
6 / 6
Won
1960 Richard Nixon/Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. 402,242 54.63%
6 / 6
Lost
1964 Barry Goldwater/William E. Miller 296,767 38.19%
0 / 6
Lost
1968 Richard Nixon/Spiro Agnew 409,345 50.46%
6 / 6
Won
1972 Richard Nixon/Spiro Agnew 597,189 62.61%
7 / 7
Won
1976 Gerald Ford/Bob Dole 584,367 54.05%
7 / 7
Lost
1980 Ronald Reagan/George H. W. Bush 652,264 55.07%
7 / 7
Won
1984 Ronald Reagan/George H. W. Bush 821,818 63.44%
8 / 8
Won
1988 George H. W. Bush/Dan Quayle 728,177 53.06%
8 / 8
Won
1992 George H. W. Bush/Dan Quayle 562,850 35.87%
0 / 8
Lost
1996 Bob Dole/Jack Kemp 691,848 45.80%
8 / 8
Lost
2000 George W. Bush/Dick Cheney 883,745 50.75%
8 / 8
Won
2004 George W. Bush/Dick Cheney 1,101,255 51.69%
9 / 9
Won
2008 John McCain/Sarah Palin 1,073,629 44.71%
0 / 9
Lost
2012 Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan 1,185,243 46.13%
0 / 9
Lost
2016 Donald Trump/Mike Pence 1,202,484 43.25%
0 / 9
Lost
2020 Donald Trump/Mike Pence 1,364,607 41.90%
0 / 9
Lost

Gubernatorial

Colorado Republican Party gubernatorial election results
Election Gubernatorial candidate Votes Vote % Result
1876 John Long Routt 14,154 51.53% Won Green tickY
1878 Frederick Walker Pitkin 14,308 49.98% Won Green tickY
1880 Frederick Walker Pitkin 28,465 53.28% Won Green tickY
1882 E. L. Campbell 28,820 46.91% Lost Red XN
1884 Benjamin Harrison Eaton 33,845 50.74% Won Green tickY
1886 William H. Meyer 26,816 45.55% Lost Red XN
1888 Job Adams Cooper 49,490 53.84% Won Green tickY
1890 John Long Routt 41,827 50.11% Won Green tickY
1892 Joseph Helm 38,806 41.79% Lost Red XN
1894 Albert McIntire 93,502 51.95% Won Green tickY
1896 G. H. Allen 23,945 12.66% Lost Red XN
1898 Henry R. Wolcott 51,051 34.17% Lost Red XN
1900 Frank C. Goudy 96,027 43.53% Lost Red XN
1902 James Hamilton Peabody 87,684 46.94% Won Green tickY
1904 James Hamilton Peabody 113,754 46.80% Lost Red XN
1906 Henry Augustus Buchtel 92,602 45.59% Won Green tickY
1908 Jesse Fuller McDonald 118,953 45.16% Lost Red XN
1910 John B. Stephen 97,691 43.48% Lost Red XN
1912 Clifford C. Parks 63,061 23.73% Lost Red XN
1914 George Alfred Carlson 129,096 48.67% Won Green tickY
1916 George Alfred Carlson 117,723 41.28% Lost Red XN
1918 Oliver Henry Shoup 112,693 51.15% Won Green tickY
1920 Oliver Henry Shoup 174,488 59.55% Won Green tickY
1922 Benjamin Griffith 134,353 48.29% Lost Red XN
1924 Clarence Morley 178,078 51.92% Won Green tickY
1926 Oliver Henry Shoup 116,756 38.11% Lost Red XN
1928 William L. Boatright 114,067 31.85% Lost Red XN
1930 Robert F. Rockwell 124,164 38.06% Lost Red XN
1932 James D. Parriott 183,258 40.78% Lost Red XN
1934 Nathan C. Warren 162,791 39.91% Lost Red XN
1936 Charles M. Armstrong 210,614 43.65% Lost Red XN
1938 Ralph Lawrence Carr 296,671 59.50% Won Green tickY
1940 Ralph Lawrence Carr 296,671 54.37% Won Green tickY
1942 John Charles Vivian 193,501 56.23% Won Green tickY
1944 John Charles Vivian 259,862 52.40% Won Green tickY
1946 Leon Lavington 160,483 47.89% Lost Red XN
1948 David A. Hamil 168,928 33.67% Lost Red XN
1950 Daniel I. J. Thornton 236,472 52.43% Won Green tickY
1952 Daniel I. J. Thornton 349,924 57.08% Won Green tickY
1954 Donald G. Brotzman 227,335 46.44% Lost Red XN
1956 Donald G. Brotzman 313,950 48.66% Lost Red XN
1958 Palmer Burch 228,643 41.59% Lost Red XN
1962 John Arthur Love 349,342 56.67% Won Green tickY
1966 John Arthur Love 356,730 54.05% Won Green tickY
1970 John Arthur Love 350,690 52.46% Won Green tickY
1974 John D. Vanderhoof 378,907 45.71% Lost Red XN
1978 Ted L. Strickland 317,292 38.53% Lost Red XN
1982 John Fuhr 302,740 31.67% Lost Red XN
1986 Ted L. Strickland 434,420 41.03% Lost Red XN
1990 John Andrews 358,403 35.43% Lost Red XN
1994 Bruce D. Benson 432,042 38.70% Lost Red XN
1998 Bill Owens 648,202 49.06% Won Green tickY
2002 Bill Owens 884,583 62.62% Won Green tickY
2006 Bob Beauprez 625,886 40.2% Lost Red XN
2010 Dan Maes 199,792 11.1% Lost Red XN
2014 Bob Beauprez 938,195 45.95% Lost Red XN
2018 Walker Stapleton 1,080,801 42.80% Lost Red XN

See also

References

  1. ^ Griswold, Jena. "June 2022 Colorado Voter Registration by Party" (PDF). Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved July 1, 2022.
  2. ^ Burness, Alexander (2021-08-17). "Colorado's far-right pushes to close primaries, which would exclude millions of voters". The Denver Post. Retrieved 2022-04-08 – via Loveland Reporter-Herald.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ Burness, Alex (2021-12-11). "Election denialism and far-right activism sit firmly within the Colorado GOP". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on 2021-12-11. Retrieved 2021-12-21.
  4. ^ "What happened to the Colorado Republican Party?". The Denver Post. 2020-12-20. Retrieved 2020-12-20.
  5. ^ Frank, John (2020-08-25). "How Colorado Republicans transformed from "Never Trump" to Donald Trump loyalists in four years". The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on 2020-09-02. Retrieved 2021-09-03.
  6. ^ Paul, Jesse (2020-11-12). "Where do Colorado Republicans go from here?". The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on 2020-11-12. Retrieved 2021-09-03.
  7. ^ Frank, John (25 February 2021). "Colorado GOP doubles down on Trump's baseless "stolen election" claims". Axios. Retrieved 9 October 2021.
  8. ^ Paul, Jesse (2021-08-30). "Colorado Republicans want to win over unaffiliated voters in 2022. Can they do it if their base is still focused on 2020?". The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on 2021-08-30. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  9. ^ Burness, Alex (2021-12-11). "Election denialism and far-right activism sit firmly within the Colorado GOP". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on 2021-12-11. Retrieved 2021-12-21.
  10. ^ "Ken Buck defends Colorado's election system against "conspiracy theory," angering fellow Trump supporters". The Denver Post. 2020-12-03. Archived from the original on 2020-12-03. Retrieved 2021-10-09. ...prominent Colorado Republicans, who tend to defend Colorado’s election system even as they cast doubt on systems in other states, or remain mum on Trump’s allegations of widespread fraud.
  11. ^ Birkeland, Bente (7 December 2020). "GOP State Reps Ask For Election Investigation In Spite Of Audit That Uncovered No Problems". Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on 2020-12-08. Retrieved 2021-10-13.
  12. ^ a b Hindi, Saja (2020-12-15). "No evidence of widespread voter fraud uncovered in meeting on Colorado election integrity". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on 2020-12-16. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  13. ^ Goodland, Marianne (10 December 2020). "Questions beginning to surface around scope of audit committee meeting on election integrity". Colorado Politics. Archived from the original on 2020-12-10. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  14. ^ Aedo, Zachary (2020-12-10). "Lamborn, Buck among 106 House Republicans backing Texas lawsuit to overturn election". KRDO. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  15. ^ Case, Angela (2021-01-07). "How Colorado lawmakers voted in the Electoral College certification". FOX21 News Colorado. Archived from the original on 2021-01-11. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  16. ^ "Most Colorado Republicans in Congress will object to election certification". The Denver Post. 2021-01-04. Archived from the original on 2021-01-04. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  17. ^ Clark, Kyle (October 5, 2021). "Testimony indicates Colorado GOP chair led fringe conspiracy group allied with militia". 9news.com. Retrieved 2021-10-09.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ Maulbetsch, Erik (2021-10-04). "Court Documents Reveal Colorado GOP Chair Led Conspiracy Group in 2020". Colorado Times Recorder. Retrieved 2021-10-09.
  19. ^ "Why Democrats think the 2020 election debate is a political win". Axios. January 19, 2022. Archived from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved February 7, 2022.
  20. ^ "Majority of Colorado House Republicans vote for supporting Jan. 6 crowd, election conspiracy theories". KMGH-TV. January 18, 2022. Archived from the original on January 31, 2022. Retrieved February 7, 2022.
  21. ^ Burness, Alex (2021-08-12). "Heidi Ganahl all but says she's running for governor". The Denver Post. Retrieved 2021-09-10.