Erebuni Airport
Russian MiG-29s at Erebuni
Summary
Airport typeMilitary
OwnerArmenian Air Force
OperatorRussian Air Force
LocationYerevan
Elevation AMSL2,955 ft / 901 m
Coordinates40°07′42″N 44°28′22″E / 40.12833°N 44.47278°E / 40.12833; 44.47278
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
03/21 8,694 2,650 Asphalt
Source: armats.com[1]

Erebuni Airport (Armenian: Էրեբունի օդանավակայան) (ICAO: UDYE) is a military airport serving Yerevan and the country of Armenia. It is located 7.3 kilometres (4.5 mi) south of the center of Yerevan. At present, the airport is mostly operated by the military and is host to the Russian 3624th Air Base and hosts a squadron of MiG-29s and Mi-24 attack helicopters. Private firms do on occasion operate chartered helicopter flights inside the country and to the CIS. The airport is also home to a single Diamond DA40 aircraft used by the local flying school.

History

The base was designed by architects L. Sh. Khristaforian and R. G. Asratian and design engineers E. N. Tosunian and I. G. Baghramian.

In 1938, the 4th aviation squadron named after Voroshilov of the Transcaucasian Military District was based at the airfield on I-15, I-16 and I-153 aircraft. In 1939, the 84th Fighter Aviation Regiment was created on the basis of the squadron, which at the beginning of the war served as the basis for the formation of two regiments:

The 84th Fighter Aviation Regiment itself was disbanded on December 24, 1942.

To help redress its relative military weaknesses compared to Azerbaijan and Turkey, on 16 March 1995 Armenia signed a treaty with Russia giving the latter a 25-year-long military presence in Armenia. On 27 September 1996 a succeeding agreement was signed which authorized the establishment of Russian aviation bases at Gyumri and Yerevan. Russian aviation forces in Armenia comprise 18 MiG-29 fighters of the 426th Fighter Squadron[4] and the 700th Air Traffic Control Center, both at the 3624th Air Base at Erebuni Airport outside Yerevan.[5] Russian fighter aircraft arrived in four separate batches: five MiG-29s on 16 December 1998, five on 26 February 1999, four more on 18 June and the final four on 22 October 1999.[6]

In November 2013, the Armenian government announced its intention to expand the space allotted to the Russian Air Force to house new buildings, fuel-storage facilities, and helicopter landing pads to host a squadron of 18 attack helicopters.[7] In January 2014, the press service of the Russian Southern Military District confirmed that a contingent of Mi-24P (Hind-F) attack helicopters, Mi-8MT and Mi-8SMV military transport helicopters would be deployed at Erebuni through the course of the year.[8]

Incidents

On 4 November 2008, an Mi-24 attack helicopter of the Armenian Air Force crashed as it was preparing for a training flight. Captain Arshak Nersisyan died in the accident.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ armats.com - eAIP Armenia
  2. ^ Анохин В. А., Быков М. Ю. Все истребительные авиаполки Сталина. Первая полная энциклопедия. — Научно-популярное издание. — М.: Яуза-пресс, 2014. — С. 333, 694, 179. — 944 с. — 1500 экз. — ISBN 978-5-9955-0707-9.
  3. ^ Анохин В. А., Быков М. Ю. Все истребительные авиаполки Сталина. Первая полная энциклопедия. — Научно-популярное издание. — М.: Яуза-пресс, 2014. — С. 333, 694, 179. — 944 с. — 1500 экз. — ISBN 978-5-9955-0707-9.
  4. ^ Warfare.ru (Undated). MIG-29/MIG-35 Fulcrum Counter-Air Fighter. Retrieved 16 February 2008.
  5. ^ Anon. (22 May 2007). "Russian Military Bases Archived 20 February 2009 at the Wayback Machine". Kommersant Vlast. Retrieved 29 December 2007.
  6. ^ Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan in the People’s Republic of China. (Undated). "Chronology of the Armenian aggression". Archived from the original on 9 April 2008.. Retrieved 29 December 2007.
  7. ^ "Armenia Says It's Ready to Host Russian Combat Helicopters." RIA Novosti. November 21, 2013. Retrieved on November 22, 2013.
  8. ^ "Russia Forms Helicopter Squadron for Armenian Base." RIA Novosti. January 17, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014.
  9. ^ "MILITARY HELICOPTER ACCIDENT". en.a1plus.am. Retrieved 2018-12-23.