Garvin County
Location within the U.S. state of Oklahoma
Oklahoma's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°43′N 97°19′W / 34.71°N 97.31°W / 34.71; -97.31
Country United States
State Oklahoma
Founded1906[1]
Named forSamuel J. Garvin[1]
SeatPauls Valley
Largest cityPauls Valley
Area
 • Total814 sq mi (2,110 km2)
 • Land802 sq mi (2,080 km2)
 • Water12 sq mi (30 km2)  1.4%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total27,576
 • Estimate 
(2019)
27,711
 • Density34/sq mi (13/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district4th

Garvin County is a county in south-central Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,576.[2] Its county seat is Pauls Valley.[3] In 1906, delegates to Constitution Convention formed Garvin County from part of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. The county was named for Samuel J. Garvin, a local Chickasaw rancher, merchant and banker. Its economy is largely based on farming, ranching and oil production.[1]

History

Garvin County came into existence on November 16, 1907, the day Oklahoma became a state. The territory within the present-day county had been a part of Pickens County, Chickasaw Nation in the Indian Territory.[4]

An election held June 20, 1908, resulted in county citizens choosing Pauls Valley as the county seat over the towns of Wynnewood and Elmore City.[1]

Oil was discovered in the southwestern part of the county known as Robberson Field in the 1920s. The Golden Trend pool, which ran from the northwest to the southern parts of the county developed later.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 814 square miles (2,110 km2), of which 802 square miles (2,080 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (1.4%) is water.[5] The county lies between the Red Bed plains and the Sandstone Hills physiographic regions. The main waterways are the Washita River, Rush Creek and Wildhorse Creek.[1]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
191026,545
192032,44522.2%
193031,401−3.2%
194031,150−0.8%
195029,500−5.3%
196028,290−4.1%
197024,874−12.1%
198027,85612.0%
199026,605−4.5%
200027,2102.3%
201027,5761.3%
2019 (est.)27,711[6]0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2019[2]
Age pyramid for Garvin County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.
Age pyramid for Garvin County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 27,210 people, 10,865 households, and 7,605 families residing in the county. The population density was 34 people per square mile (13/km2). There were 12,641 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.93% White, 2.55% Black or African American, 7.36% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.54% from other races, and 3.34% from two or more races. 3.40% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 10,865 households, out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.40% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.00% were non-families. 26.90% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.80% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 23.10% from 45 to 64, and 17.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,070, and the median income for a family was $34,774. Males had a median income of $28,033 versus $18,940 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,856. About 11.40% of families and 15.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.60% of those under age 18 and 14.30% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2019[12]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 6,255 40.63%
Republican 7,028 45.65%
Others 2,112 13.71%
Total 15,395 100%
United States presidential election results for Garvin County, Oklahoma[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 8,878 81.29% 1,865 17.08% 179 1.64%
2016 8,253 78.26% 1,855 17.59% 438 4.15%
2012 6,925 73.02% 2,559 26.98% 0 0.00%
2008 7,710 71.80% 3,028 28.20% 0 0.00%
2004 7,610 67.24% 3,707 32.76% 0 0.00%
2000 5,536 56.24% 4,189 42.56% 118 1.20%
1996 3,745 38.34% 4,639 47.50% 1,383 14.16%
1992 3,983 33.57% 4,811 40.55% 3,069 25.87%
1988 5,109 47.94% 5,438 51.03% 109 1.02%
1984 7,505 63.54% 4,215 35.69% 91 0.77%
1980 5,520 50.83% 5,033 46.34% 307 2.83%
1976 3,905 36.21% 6,797 63.02% 83 0.77%
1972 7,245 70.72% 2,685 26.21% 315 3.07%
1968 3,786 36.75% 3,845 37.33% 2,670 25.92%
1964 3,470 33.10% 7,013 66.90% 0 0.00%
1960 5,125 51.66% 4,795 48.34% 0 0.00%
1956 3,850 37.38% 6,451 62.62% 0 0.00%
1952 4,402 39.14% 6,844 60.86% 0 0.00%
1948 1,681 19.87% 6,779 80.13% 0 0.00%
1944 2,086 28.11% 5,328 71.80% 7 0.09%
1940 2,958 29.58% 7,001 70.02% 40 0.40%
1936 1,700 21.16% 6,276 78.12% 58 0.72%
1932 1,034 11.66% 7,834 88.34% 0 0.00%
1928 3,321 47.44% 3,589 51.26% 91 1.30%
1924 1,863 26.87% 4,758 68.63% 312 4.50%
1920 2,922 40.09% 4,093 56.15% 274 3.76%
1916 804 17.77% 2,697 59.62% 1,023 22.61%
1912 740 18.87% 2,114 53.90% 1,068 27.23%


Economy

While oil and gas production are important to the county economy, agriculture has been the major industry for employment since statehood. In 1907 crops of alfalfa, broomcorn, cotton, onions, potatoes, and hay produced in the county were valued at $2.5 million. By the 1930s over 1,000 acres (400 ha) had been planted with paper shelled pecan trees. By 1961 the Lindsay area harvested more broomcorn than any other region in the world, and the county slogan became "We sweep the world."[1]

Communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Lough, D. Keith. "Oklahoma Encyclopedia of History and Culture - Garvin County". Retrieved April 4, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved November 9, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Charles Goins, Historical Atlas of Oklahoma (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2006), plate 105.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  6. ^ "County Population Totals: 2010-2019". Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. ^ "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). OK.gov. January 15, 2019. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 29, 2018.

Coordinates: 34°43′N 97°19′W / 34.71°N 97.31°W / 34.71; -97.31