The New York State portal

Location of New York state in the United States
Location of New York state in the United States

New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. It is sometimes called New York State to distinguish it from its largest city, New York City. With a total area of 54,556 square miles (141,300 km2), New York is the 27th largest state geographically. With 20.2 million residents, it is the fourth most populous state in the United States as of 2021, with approximately 44% living in New York City and another 14% on the remainder of Long Island. The state is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest.

New York City (NYC) is the most populous city in the United States, and two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area. NYC is home to the United Nations Headquarters, and has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, as well as the world's most economically powerful city. The next five most populous cities in the state are Buffalo, Yonkers, Rochester, Syracuse, and the state capital of Albany.

New York has a diverse geography. The southern part of the state is in the Atlantic coastal plain and includes Long Island and several smaller associated islands, as well as New York City and the lower Hudson River Valley. The larger Upstate New York region comprises several ranges of the wider Appalachian Mountains, and the Adirondack Mountains in the northeastern lobe of the state. The north–south Hudson River Valley and the east–west Mohawk River Valley bisect these more mountainous regions. Western New York is part of the Great Lakes region and borders on the Great Lakes of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, as well as Niagara Falls. The central part of the state is dominated by the Finger Lakes, a popular vacation and tourist destination. (Full article...)

Refresh with new selections below (purge)

Good article - show another

This is a Good article, an article that meets a core set of high editorial standards.

The Battle of Long Island, 1776, by Domenick D'Andrea
The Battle of Long Island, 1776, by Domenick D'Andrea

The Battle of Long Island, also known as the Battle of Brooklyn and the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, was an action of the American Revolutionary War fought on Tuesday, August 27, 1776, at the western edge of Long Island in the present-day Brooklyn, New York. The British defeated the Americans and gained access to the strategically important Port of New York, which they held for the rest of the war. It was the first major battle to take place after the United States declared its independence on July 4, and in troop deployment and combat, it was the largest battle of the war.

After defeating the British in the siege of Boston on March 17, commander-in-chief George Washington relocated the Continental Army to defend the port city of New York, located at the southern end of Manhattan Island. Washington understood that the city's harbor would provide an excellent base for the Royal Navy, so he established defenses there and waited for the British to attack. In July, the British, under the command of General William Howe, landed a few miles across the harbor on the sparsely populated Staten Island, where they were reinforced by a fleet of ships in Lower New York Bay over the next month and a half, bringing their total force to 32,000 troops. Washington knew the difficulty in holding the city with the British fleet in control of the entrance to the harbor at the Narrows, and accordingly moved the bulk of his forces to Manhattan, believing that it would be the first target. (Full article...)

Selected article - show another

Cornell University is a private Ivy League and statutory land-grant research university, based in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, Cornell was founded with the intention to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge — from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's founding principle, a popular 1868 quotation from founder Ezra Cornell: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."

The university is organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its specific admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy. The university also administers two satellite campuses, one in New York City and one in Education City, Qatar. (Full article...)

General images

The following are images from various New York state-related articles on Wikipedia.

Selected quote - show another

They say life's what happens when you're busy making other plans. But sometimes in New York, life is what happens when you're waiting for a table. — Carrie Bradshaw
More selected quotes • Read more...

Featured article - show another

This is a Featured article, which represents some of the best content on English Wikipedia.

Robert Sterling Yard in Yosemite National Park, 1920
Robert Sterling Yard in Yosemite National Park, 1920

Robert Sterling Yard (February 1, 1861 – May 17, 1945) was an American writer, journalist, and wilderness activist. Born in Haverstraw, New York, Yard graduated from Princeton University and spent the first twenty years of his career in the editing and publishing business. In 1915, he was recruited by his friend Stephen Mather to help publicize the need for an independent national park agency. Their numerous publications were part of a movement that resulted in legislative support for a National Park Service (NPS) in 1916. Yard served as head of the National Parks Educational Committee for several years after its conception, but tension within the NPS led him to concentrate on non-government initiatives. He became executive secretary of the National Parks Association in 1919.

Yard worked to promote the national parks as well as educate Americans about their use. Creating high standards based on aesthetic ideals for park selection, he also opposed commercialism and industrialization of what he called "America's masterpieces". These standards subsequently caused discord with his peers. After helping to establish a relationship between the NPA and the United States Forest Service, Yard later became involved in the protection of wilderness areas. In 1935, he became one of the eight founding members of The Wilderness Society and acted as its first president from 1937 until his death eight years later. Yard is now considered an important figure in the modern wilderness movement. (Full article...)

Selected picture - show another

The Montauk Point Lighthouse is in Montauk Point State Park, which is located in the village of Montauk at the eastern tip of Long Island in Suffolk County, New York. Montauk Point is the easternmost extremity of the South Fork of Long Island, and also extreme points of the New York State. Construction on the lighthouse was authorized by the Second United States Congress, under President George Washington in 1792. Construction began on June 7, 1796, and was completed on November 5, 1796.

In the news

Did you know? - show different entries

  • ...that contrary to some beliefs, the Battle of Plattsburgh was decided by the naval engagement and not other means?
  • ...that Hawker v. New York is a law preventing convicted felons from practicing medicine, even when the felony conviction occurred before the law was enacted, as decided by the Supreme Court of the United States?
  • ...that Representatives of the Albany Congress met on a daily basis between June 19 and July 11 to discuss better relations with the Indian tribes and common defensive measures against the French?

March selected anniversaries

Selected panorama - show another

Credit: UpstateNYer

Troy is a city on the east bank of the Hudson River located a few miles north of the capital, Albany. Settled in 1707, Troy was incorporated as a village in 1787, as a town in 1791, and finally as a city in 1816. This photo is of Lansingburgh, an area of North Troy, which was founded as a separate town, but incorporated into the city of Troy in 1900. Troy is known as the "Collar City" for being a manufacturing center for shirts, shirtwaists, collars, and cuffs in the late 1800s. This photo is taken from Oakwood Cemetery, burial place of Sam Wilson, the origin of Uncle Sam.

More selected panoramas Read more...

Topics

Categories

Select [►] to view subcategories

Recognized content

Featured articles

Featured lists

Good articles

Related portals

State facts

  • Total area: 54,555 mi2
    • Land: 47,190 mi2
    • Water: 7,365 mi2
  • Highest elevation: 5,344 ft (Mount Marcy)
  • Population 19,745,289 (2016 est)
  • Admission to the Union: July 26, 1788 (11th)

State symbols:

WikiProjects

Main project

Things you can do

  • Requested articles: Hinduism in New York
  • Help assess articles supported by WikiProject New York (state)
  • Help suggest content for usage in this portal by using the archive links to obtain instructions
  • Write New York topics if you see a redlink which is worthy of an article
  • Cleanup and expand stub-class articles relating to New York

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wikivoyage 
Travel guides

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Sources

Portals