2020 Washington Statewide Executive Offices elections

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All statewide executive offices
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 7 2
Seats won 8 1
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease 1

General elections were held in the U.S. state of Washington on November 3, 2020. A primary was held on August 4.[1] This election cycle is notable as it was only the second in state history in which Democrats won the top three statewide elections by double digits. The first was the 1936 election, in the middle of the Great Depression.[2] As of 2022, this was the last time Republicans won any statewide election in Washington.

Federal

President of the United States

Main article: 2020 United States presidential election in Washington (state)

Washington has 12 electoral votes for the presidential election, remaining unchanged from 2016.[3] A presidential primary for both parties was held on March 10, 2020, with 13 candidates for the Democrats and one candidate for the Republicans.[4] The 2020 Democratic primary was the first in the state's history to have a binding vote, replacing the caucus system that overrode the nonbinding primary vote.[5]

United States House of Representatives

Main article: 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington

All 10 of Washington's seats in the United States House of Representatives were up for re-election. All but one of the incumbents ran for re-election, the exception being Denny Heck (D) of the 10th district.[6]

Statewide executive

Governor

Main article: 2020 Washington gubernatorial election

Incumbent Governor Jay Inslee (D) was re-elected to a third term in a landslide.[7]

Lieutenant Governor

Main article: 2020 Washington lieutenant gubernatorial election

Incumbent Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib (D) retired from politics.[8] U.S. Representative Denny Heck won the open seat.[9]

Attorney General

Incumbent Attorney General Bob Ferguson (D) was re-elected to a third term.[7][10]

Polling

Blanket primary
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Matt
Larkin (R)
Brett
Rogers (R)
Mike
Vaska (R)
Bob
Ferguson (D)
Undecided
SurveyUSA July 22–27, 2020 513 (LV) ± 5.4% 13% 7% 5% 52% 22%
SurveyUSA May 16–19, 2020 650 (LV) ±  5.6% 8% 8% 4% 47% 32%
General election
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Bob
Ferguson (D)
Matt
Larkin (R)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 53% 39% 8%
SurveyUSA October 8–10, 2020 591 (LV) ± 5.2% 49% 38% 13%
2020 Washington Attorney General election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Ferguson (incumbent) 1,356,225 55.8
Republican Matt Larkin 575,470 23.7
Republican Brett Rogers 296,843 12.2
Republican Mike Vaska 199,826 8.2
Write-in 2,372 0.1
Total votes 2,430,736 100.0
General election
Democratic Bob Ferguson (incumbent) 2,226,418 56.4
Republican Matt Larkin 1,714,927 43.5
Write-in 3,968 0.1
Total votes 3,945,313 100.0
Democratic hold

Secretary of State

Main article: 2020 Washington Secretary of State election

Incumbent Secretary of State Kim Wyman (R) was re-elected to a third term.[7][13] State Representative Gael Tarleton (D–Seattle) unsuccessfully challenged Wyman.[14]

2020 Washington Secretary of State election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kim Wyman (incumbent) 1,238,455 50.9
Democratic Gael Tarleton 1,053,584 43.3
Independent Ed Minger 87,982 3.6
Washington Progressive Party Gentry Lange 51,826 2.1
Write-in 1,919 0.1
Total votes 2,433,766 100.0
General election
Republican Kim Wyman (incumbent) 2,116,141 53.6
Democratic Gael Tarleton 1,826,710 46.3
Write-in 4,666 0.1
Total votes 3,947,517 100.0
Republican hold

Public Lands Commissioner

Incumbent Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz (D) was re-elected to a second term.[7]

Polling

General election
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Hillary
Franz (D)
Sue Kuehl
Pederson (R)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 49% 36% 15%
2020 Washington Commissioner of Public Lands election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hilary Franz (incumbent) 1,211,310 51.1
Republican Sue Kuehl Pederson 554,147 23.4
Republican Cameron Whitney 197,610 8.3
Republican Steve Sharon 179,714 7.6
Democratic Frank Wallbrown 122,136 5.2
Libertarian Kelsey Reyes 77,407 3.4
Republican Maryam Abasbarzy 24,189 1.0
Write-in 2,504 0.1
Total votes 2,369,017 100
General election
Democratic Hilary Franz (incumbent) 2,212,158 56.7
Republican Sue Kuehl Pederson 1,686,320 43.2
Write-in 3,799 0.1
Total votes 3,902,277 100.0
Democratic hold

State Auditor

Incumbent State Auditor Pat McCarthy (D) was re-elected to a second term.[7]

Polling

General election
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Pat
McCarthy (D)
Chris
Leyba (R)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 48% 34% 14%
2020 Washington State Auditor election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pat McCarthy (incumbent) 1,134,077 47.4
Republican Chris Leyba 982,411 41.1
Democratic Joshua Casey 273,198 11.4
Write-in 2,278 0.1
Total votes 2,391,964 100.0
General election
Democratic Pat McCarthy (incumbent) 2,260,830 58.0
Republican Chris Leyba 1,633,956 41.9
Write-in 3,316 0.1
Total votes 3,898,102 100.0
Democratic hold

State Treasurer

Incumbent state treasurer Duane Davidson (R) ran for a second term. State Representative Mike Pellicciotti (D–Federal Way) defeated Davidson.[15]

Polling

General election
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Duane
Davidson (R)
Mike
Pellicciotti (D)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 36% 46% 18%
2020 Washington State Treasurer election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Pellicciotti 1,279,452 53.2
Republican Duane Davidson (incumbent) 1,121,885 46.7
Write-in 2,604 0.1
Total votes 2,403,941 100.0
General election
Democratic Mike Pellicciotti 2,089,159 53.4
Republican Duane Davidson (incumbent) 1,818,895 46.5
Write-in 3,339 0.1
Total votes 3,911,393 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

Superintendent of Public Instruction

Incumbent state superintendent Chris Reykdal (non-partisan election) was re-elected to a second term.[7]

Polling

General election
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Chris
Rekydal
Maia
Espinoza
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 30% 23% 47%
2020 Superintendent of Public Instruction election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Chris Reykdal (incumbent) 898,951 40.2
Nonpartisan Maia Espinoza 564,674 25.3
Nonpartisan Ron Higgins 456,879 20.5
Nonpartisan Dennis Wick 121,425 5.4
Nonpartisan David Spring 111,176 5.0
Nonpartisan Stan Lippmann 71,395 3.2
Write-in 9,571 0.4
Total votes 2,234,071 100.0
General election
Nonpartisan Chris Reykdal (incumbent) 1,955,365 54.6
Nonpartisan Maia Espinoza 1,609,643 44.9
Write-in 17,957 0.5
Total votes 3,582,965 100.0
Democratic hold

Insurance Commissioner

Incumbent insurance commissioner Mike Kreidler (D) was re-elected to a sixth term.[7]

Polling

General election
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Mike
Kreidler (D)
Chirayu Avinash
Patel (R)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 52% 30% 18%
2020 Washington Insurance Commissioner election[11][12]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Kreidler (incumbent) 1,402,650 59.0
Republican Chirayu Avinash Patel 644,446 27.1
Libertarian Anthony Welti 324,921 13.7
Write-in 4,220 0.2
Total votes 2,376,237 100.0
General election
Democratic Mike Kreidler (incumbent) 2,506,693 65.4
Republican Chirayu Avinash Patel 1,308,292 34.1
Write-in 18,576 0.5
Total votes 3,833,561 100.0
Democratic hold

Supreme Court

Seats 3, 4, and 7 of the Washington Supreme Court were up for six-year terms. Debra L. Stephens, Charles W. Johnson, and Raquel Montoya-Lewis ran for new terms. Seat 6 Justice Charles Wiggins retired and Governor Inslee's appointee G. Helen Whitener[16] ran for the final two years of the term.[17]

Polling

Position 3

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Raquel
Montoya-Lewis
David
Larson
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 21% 17% 62%
Public Policy Polling May 19–20, 2020 1,070 (LV) ± 3% 14% 8% 78%

Position 6

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
G. Helen
Whitener
Richard
S. Serns
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 22% 12% 66%
Public Policy Polling May 19–20, 2020 1,070 (LV) ± 3% 13% 6% 81%

Legislative

State Senate

Main article: 2020 Washington State Senate election

Twenty-five of the forty-nine seats in the Washington State Senate were up for election. Democrats kept a 28–21 majority in the Senate. Senators retiring this election were Senators Randi Becker (R-Olympia),[18] Maureen Walsh (R-Walla Walla),[19] and Hans Zeiger (R-Puyallup).[20] Senators Dean Takko (D) and Steve O'Ban (R) lost reelection.

State House of Representatives

Main article: 2020 Washington House of Representatives election

All 98 seats in the Washington House of Representatives were up for election. Democrats kept a 57–41 majority in the House. House members who didn't run for re-election were Representatives Sherry Appleton (D-Poulsbo),[21] Richard DeBolt (R-Chehalis),[22] Beth Doglio (D-Olympia),[23] Chris Gildon (R-Puyallup),[20] Bill Jenkin (R-Prosser),[24] Christine Kilduff (D-University Place),[25] Mike Pellicciotti (D-Federal Way),[15] Eric Pettigrew (D-Seattle),[26] Norma Smith (R-Clinton),[27] and Gael Tarleton (D-Seattle).[14] Representatives Luanne Van Werven (R) and Brian Blake (D) lost reelection.

Ballot measures

No initiatives to the people qualified for the ballot. One referendum was on the ballot, on Senate Bill 5395 regarding sexual education.[28] One constitutional amendment was on the ballot, regarding the Family and Medical Leave Insurance Account and the Long-Term Care Services and Supports Trust Account.[29] It passed with 58% in favor.

Ballot Initiatives

Polling

Referendum 90
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Approve Reject Undecided
PPP/NPI October 14–15, 2020 610 (LV) ± 4% 56% 33% 11%
SurveyUSA/KING-TV October 8–10, 2020 591 (LV) ± 5.2% 52% 34% 14%

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear

See also

References

  1. ^ "Dates and Deadlines 2020". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  2. ^ "Election Results and Voters' Pamphlets". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  3. ^ "Distribution of Electoral Votes". National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved February 4, 2020.
  4. ^ Brunner, Jim (January 6, 2020). "Thirteen Democrats qualify for Washington presidential primary, Trump sole choice for Republicans". The Seattle Times. Retrieved February 4, 2020.
  5. ^ Gutman, David; Brunner, Jim (January 26, 2020). "Washington's presidential primary is no longer a meaningless 'beauty contest'; this one really counts". The Seattle Times. Retrieved February 4, 2020.
  6. ^ Stack, Liam (December 4, 2020). "Denny Heck, a Washington Democrat, Won't Seek House Re-election". The New York Times. Retrieved February 4, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Cornfield, Jerry (October 9, 2019). "A boring election for state seats in 2020? Try nine of them". The Everett Herald. Retrieved February 2, 2020.
  8. ^ Habib, Cyrus (March 19, 2020). "Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib: Why I am giving up elected office and joining the Jesuits". America.
  9. ^ "Denny Heck defeats Marko Liias in Washington state lieutenant governor election results". Seattle Times. November 3, 2020. Retrieved November 4, 2020.
  10. ^ "Bob Ferguson defeats Matt Larkin in Washington state attorney general election results". Seattle Times. November 3, 2020. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g "August 4, 2020 Primary Results". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g "November 3, 2020 General Election Results - State Executive". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  13. ^ "Kim Wyman leads Gael Tarleton in Washington state secretary of state election results". Seattle Times. November 3, 2020. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  14. ^ a b "Q&A: Rep. Gael Tarleton on her bid to become Washington's next Secretary of State". Washington State Wire. January 14, 2020. Retrieved February 5, 2020.
  15. ^ a b Mirror, For the (May 17, 2019). "State Rep. Mike Pellicciotti announces early bid for state treasurer". Federal Way Mirror. Retrieved February 2, 2020.
  16. ^ Stern, Mark Joseph (April 17, 2020). "Washington State Now Has the Most Diverse Supreme Court In History". Slate Magazine. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  17. ^ La Corte, Rachel (January 18, 2020). "Washington Supreme Court Justice Charles Wiggins to retire". The Olympian.
  18. ^ "Sen. Randi Becker announces retirement from Senate at end of current term". Washington State Wire. March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  19. ^ Union-Bulletin, CHLOE LeVALLEY of the Walla Walla. "Sen. Maureen Walsh says she won't seek re-election". Union-Bulletin.com. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  20. ^ a b "The News Tribune". account.thenewstribune.com. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  21. ^ Pilling, Nathan. "Rep. Sherry Appleton, longtime member of Kitsap legislative delegation, to retire". Kitsap Sun. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  22. ^ Chronicle, Eric Schwartz and Natalie Johnson The. "State Rep. Richard DeBolt Announces Upcoming Retirement From House After 24 Years". The Chronicle. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  23. ^ "Washington state Rep. Beth Doglio joins crowded race to succeed Denny Heck in Congress". The Seattle Times. March 2, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  24. ^ "Realtor, farm leader to run for Legislature, representing part of Benton County and Pasco". Tri-City Herald. February 27, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  25. ^ "Rep. Christine Kilduff announces that she will not seek re-election in the 28th Legislative District". Washington State Wire. March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  26. ^ Jan 30, Rich Smith •; Pm, 2020 at 12:43. "Rep. Eric Pettigrew Says He Won't Seek Re-Election, Opening Space for a True Progressive to Run". The Stranger. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  27. ^ Service, SC News staff, Skagit Publishing, and WNPA News. "10th District Rep. Norma Smith will not run for re-election". goSkagit. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  28. ^ "Washington Referendum 90, Sex Education in Public Schools Measure (2020)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  29. ^ "Washington Authorize Fund Investment of Family Medical Leave and Long-Term Care Accounts Amendment (2020)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved July 8, 2020.