Iodyl fluoride
Names
IUPAC name
Fluoro(dioxo)-λ5-iodane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/FIO2/c1-2(3)4
    Key: FRYHXHDHQQGJSF-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • O=I(F)=O
Properties
FIO2
Molar mass 177.901 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless crystals
Density 4.982 g/cm3
Melting point 200 °C (392 °F; 473 K)
Reacts with water
Related compounds
Related compounds
Iodosyl pentafluoride
Iodosyl trifluoride
Periodyl fluoride
Iodyl trifluoride
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Iodyl fluoride is an inorganic compound of iodine, fluorine, and oxygen with the chemical formula IO2F. The compound was initially synthesized in 1951.[1]

Synthesis

2IOF3 ⇌ IO2F + IF5
I2O5 + HF → IO2F + HIO3

Physical properties

Iodyl fluoride forms colorless crystals of orthorhombic system.[3] Reacts with water.[4]

Chemical properties

Iodyl fluoride is stable in dry air, but slowly hydrolyzes to iodic and hydrofluoric acids in moisture.[1]

IO2F + H2O → HIO3 + HF

The compound reacts with strong fluorinating agents such as bromine trifluoride and selenium tetrafluoride to form iodine pentafluoride. Iodyl fluoride can be reduced to elemental iodine by pure hydrogen peroxide.[5][6]

3IO2F + 4BrF3 → 3IF5 + 2Br2 + 3O2
IO2F + 2SeF4 → IF5 + 2SeOF2

References

  1. ^ a b c Aynsley, E. E.; Nichols, R.; Robinson, P. L. (1 January 1953). "126. Reactions of iodine pentafluoride with inorganic substances. Iodine oxytrifluoride and iodyl fluoride". Journal of the Chemical Society: 623–626. doi:10.1039/JR9530000623. ISSN 0368-1769. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  2. ^ Wiberg, Egon; Wiberg, Nils (2001). Inorganic Chemistry. Academic Press. p. 468. ISBN 978-0-12-352651-9. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  3. ^ Minkwitz, Rolf; Berkei, Michael; Ludwig, Ralf (1 December 2001). "Crystal Structure of IO2F". Inorganic Chemistry. 40 (25): 6493–6495. doi:10.1021/ic0105462. ISSN 0020-1669. PMID 11720506. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  4. ^ Haynes, William M. (4 June 2014). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. CRC Press. p. 4-67. ISBN 978-1-4822-0868-9. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  5. ^ Schmeisser, M.; Brändle, K. (1 January 1963). "Oxides and Oxyfluorides of the Halogens". Advances in Inorganic Chemistry and Radiochemistry. Academic Press. 5: 41–89. doi:10.1016/S0065-2792(08)60152-1. ISBN 9780120236053. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  6. ^ Advances in Inorganic Chemistry and Radiochemistry. Academic Press. 1 January 1963. ISBN 978-0-08-057854-5. Retrieved 24 May 2023.