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Louis Thomassin.
Louis Thomassin.

Louis Thomassin (Latin: Ludovicus Thomassinus; 28 August 1619, Aix-en-Provence – 24 December 1695, Paris) was a French theologian and Oratorian.

Life

At the age of thirteen he entered the Oratory and for some years was professor of literature in various colleges of the congregation, of theology at Saumur, and finally in the seminary of Saint Magloire, in Paris, where he remained until his death.

Thomassin was one of the most learned men of his time, "Vir stupendae plane eruditionis", as Hugo von Hurter says, in his Nomenclator literarius recentioris II (Innsbruck, 1893), 410.

Works

De Verbi Dei Incarnatione, 1680
De Verbi Dei Incarnatione, 1680
Traité du négoce et de l'usure, 1697.
Traité du négoce et de l'usure, 1697.

His chief works are:

The last-named two posthumous works were published by P. Bordes, who wrote a life of Thomassin at the beginning of the "Glossarium".

References