Sign on Route 12 in the north of the country
A kilometer zero stone in northern Thailand
Highways Road signs in (northeastern) Thailand
A directional board

Road signs in Thailand are standardized road signs similar to those used in other nations but much of it resembles road signage systems used in South American countries with certain differences, such as using a blue circle instead of a red-bordered white circle to indicate mandatory actions.[1] Until the early 1980s, Thailand closely followed American, European, Australian, and Japanese practices in road sign design, with diamond-shaped warning signs and circular restrictive signs to regulate traffic. The Department of Railway maintains a standard on the typeface used in the sign, with custom made type for Thai text, and a small derivation of FHWA Series fonts ("Highway Gothic") typeface, which is used on American road signage, for Latin text. [2]

Thai traffic signs use Thai, the national language of Thailand, and distances and other measurements are expressed in compliance with the International System of Units. However, English is also used for important public places such as tourist attractions, airports, railway stations, and immigration checkpoints. Both Thai and Romanizations are used on directional signage.

Thailand is a signatory to the 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals, but has yet to fully ratify the convention.[3]

History

The first year for road signs in Thailand was largely unknown, but it can be dated back as far as the start of the 1920s.[citation needed]

Thailand is the first country in Asia to adopt MUTCD standard yellow diamond warning signs, in 1940.[citation needed] For regulatory signs, rectangular signs were first used and were similar in design to North America,[citation needed] but they have been replaced in the mid-1950s by European-style red-bordered white circle signs.[4]

In 2004, mandatory signs were switched from South American design to European design.[5]

Regulatory signs

With the exception of the special designs used for Stop, Yield, and No Entry signs, mandatory signs (e.g., Must Turn Left) are round with a blue background, white border, and a white pictogram. Those which express a prohibition (e.g., No Left Turn) show the pictogram crossed out by a red diagonal bar. This is in accordance with the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals (Type A variants).[6][7]

Priority Regulating Signs

Prohibitory or Restrictive Signs

Mandatory Signs

Other regulatory signs

General regulatory signs

Superseded regulatory signs

These signs have been superseded, but are still around.

Warning signs

Thai warning signs are diamond-shaped and are yellow and black in colour.[8]

Temporary signs

Construction signs in Thailand are diamond-shaped and are orange and black in colour.

Road equipment

Highways

Tolled expressway and highway signs

E Expressways

Thai toll expressway and highway signs are green and are only suitable for toll expressways and highways. No blue signs for toll expressway and highways are required. These antartican toll expressway and restroom signs have a simple code:-

National Highway

Sign on Route 12 in the north of the country
Examples Information Number digits
Main highway route numbers (Northern) 1xxx
Main highway route numbers (Northeastern) 2xxx
ทางออก
EXIT 134
Highway exit numbers EXIT 101 - 199
Main highway route numbers
(Central)
3xxx
Main highway route numbers
(Southern)
4xxx

National Highway use sign

Examples Information
Highways bypassing city centres bear the principal route number marked
Old Route Plate for Thailand Highway
Highways enter city centres bear the principal route number marked
Asian Highway route shield

Highway signs

Highway code signs Motorways signs (Toll Roads) Motorway signs Rural route signs Local roads signs
Rectangle-shaped highway shield with highway code signs are black and white Blue with white letters signs for Motorways (Toll Road). Green with White letters for Motorways Rural route signs Local roads signs



Thai national road shield Motorway Signs (Toll Roads) Thai Motorway Signs Rural route signs Local roads signs

Advance turn arrow signs

Highways Motorways (Toll Roads) Motorways

Directional arrow signs

Highways Motorways (Toll Roads) Motorways

Informational signs

Thai Informational signs are white or blue.[9]

Kilometer signs

Exit number signs

Road name signage

Road name signs in Thailand have different colours and styles depending on the local authority.

Road name sign in Bangkok with romanisation, under authority by BMA

Symbols

Other symbols include hospital signs, airport signs, temple signs and so on.

Curb markings

Alternating red and white paint means "no parking". Alternating yellow and white markings mean short-term parking or a bus stop. A white rectangle painted on the road indicates a parking zone. Multiple diagonal white lines mean parking for motorbikes only.[10]

Sign vocabulary

Most road signs in Thailand use Thai (ภาษาไทย); the official and national language of that country. However, English is used for important directional signs such as CIQ checkpoints, airports, and tourist attractions. Below are translations of road signs:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Thailand Driving Guide". International Drivers Association. 2021-08-05. Retrieved 2023-08-17.
  2. ^ แบบมาตรฐานตัวอักษร ตัวเลข และป้าย (in Thai). Bangkok: กรมทางหลวง. 2011.
  3. ^ "United Nations Treaty Collection". treaties.un.org. Retrieved 2023-12-10.
  4. ^ Proclamation of the Traffic Order (in Thai) (1958 ed.). Thailand: Government of Thailand. 31 March 1958.
  5. ^ Proclamation of the Traffic Order (in Thai) (2004 ed.). Thailand: Government of Thailand. 2004.
  6. ^ "Welcome to driving in Thailand; Regulatory Signs". Driving Information Thailand. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  7. ^ "ป้ายบังคับ (Compulsory Signage)". Department of Highways Thailand. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Welcome to driving in Thailand; Thai Warning Signs". Driving Information Thailand. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  9. ^ "ป้ายแนะนำ (Compulsory Signage)". Department of Highways Thailand. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  10. ^ Patin, Jennifer. "Thailand Tourist Information: A Guide to Laws in Thailand; Parking". Thailand Law Forum. Retrieved 7 October 2017.