Delaware County
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°17′N 83°01′W / 40.28°N 83.01°W / 40.28; -83.01
Country United States
State Ohio
FoundedFebruary 10, 1808[1]
Named forthe Delaware Indians
SeatDelaware
Largest cityDelaware*
Area
 • Total457 sq mi (1,180 km2)
 • Land443 sq mi (1,150 km2)
 • Water14 sq mi (40 km2)  3.1%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total214,124
 • Density470/sq mi (180/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district12th
Websitewww.co.delaware.oh.us
  • Based on population just within the county.[2]

Delaware County is a county located in the central portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. It is a frequent placeholder on the List of highest-income counties in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 214,124.[3] Its county seat is Delaware.[4] The county was formed in 1808 from Franklin County, Ohio. Both the county and its seat are named after the Delaware Indian tribe.[5] Delaware County was listed as the 35th wealthiest county in the United States in 2020.[6][7] Delaware County is included in the Columbus, Ohio Metropolitan Area. U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes was born and raised in Delaware County. It is also home to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

History

The area including Delaware County was once home to numerous Native American tribes. In 1804, Colonel Moses Byxbe and Henry Baldwin, among others, migrated to central Ohio from Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and built a town on the west bank of the Olentangy River.[8] On February 10, 1808, the Ohio government authorized the creation of Delaware County.[9] Following the War of 1812, settlers began to arrive in the county and settled down in Delaware. The town was incorporated in 1816, being the first incorporated town in the county. Powell, originally named Middlebury, was founded in 1801, but was not incorporated until 1947. Sunbury was founded in 1816. Ohio Wesleyan University, a liberal arts college, was founded by Methodists in 1842.

Delaware County had Northern sympathies during the Civil War, and abolitionists brought the Underground Railroad through the area. A local road, Africa Road, derives its name from the era. Camp Delaware was one of the few Civil War camps that deployed African American soldiers. The Civil War played an important part in Delaware County's growth, bringing railroad business and technology. By 1900, Delaware had its first electric streetway, and an electric interurban railroad connecting Marion and Columbus ran through the county. The Little Brown Jug race was founded in 1946, and is one of the races in the Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers.

In 2008, Forbes magazine ranked Delaware County as the fifth best place in the United States to raise a family and the second best in Ohio, behind Geauga County.[10] in 2020 Delaware was rated the best county to live in Ohio and 24th in the United States by Niche,[11] 17th healthiest county by US News,[12] and 24th best counties to live in by 247WallSt.[13]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 457 square miles (1,180 km2), of which 443 square miles (1,150 km2) is land and 14 square miles (36 km2) (3.1%) is water.[14] The county has an even terrain and a fertile soil.[15]

Adjacent counties

Lakes and rivers

The major rivers of the county are the Scioto River, Olentangy River, Alum Creek, and the Big Walnut Creek. These waterways run from north to south across the county. The Alum Creek Lake[16] and the Delaware Lake[17] are reservoirs created on Alum Creek and the Olentangy River, respectively.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18102,000
18207,639282.0%
183011,50450.6%
184022,06091.8%
185021,817−1.1%
186023,9029.6%
187025,1755.3%
188027,3818.8%
189027,189−0.7%
190026,401−2.9%
191027,1823.0%
192026,013−4.3%
193026,0160.0%
194026,7802.9%
195030,27813.1%
196036,10719.3%
197042,90818.8%
198053,84025.5%
199066,92924.3%
2000109,98964.3%
2010174,21458.4%
2020214,12422.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
1790-1960[19] 1900-1990[20]
1990-2000[21] 2020 [22]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 109,989 people, 39,674 households, and 30,668 families living in the county. The population density is 249 people per square mile (96/km2). There were 42,374 housing units at an average density of 96 per square mile (37/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 94.25% White, 2.52% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.54% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.01% of the population. 26.8% were of German, 11.7% Irish, 11.3% English, 10.7% American and 6.9% Italian ancestry according to 2000 census.

There were 39,674 households, out of which 40.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.70% were married couples living together, 6.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.70% were non-families. 18.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 28.20% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 32.60% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 8.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $67,258, and the median income for a family was $76,453. Males had a median income of $51,428 versus $33,041 for females. The per capita income for the county was $31,600. About 2.90% of families and 3.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.40% of those under the age of 18 and 4.80% of those 65 and older.

By 2007, the median income for a household and for a family had risen to $80,526 and $94,099 respectively.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Delaware County is the 21st fastest growing county in the United States.[citation needed]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 174,214 people, 62,760 households, and 47,977 families living in the county.[23] The population density was 393.2 inhabitants per square mile (151.8/km2). There were 66,378 housing units at an average density of 149.8 per square mile (57.8/km2).[24] The racial makeup of the county was 89.7% white, 4.3% Asian, 3.4% black or African American, 0.1% American Indian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.1% of the population.[23] In terms of ancestry, 34.2% were German, 16.3% were Irish, 14.0% were English, 8.1% were Italian, and 5.7% were American.[25]

Of the 62,760 households, 41.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.8% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 23.6% were non-families, and 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.16. The median age was 37.4 years.[23]

The median income for a household in the county was $87,908 and the median income for a family was $101,698. Males had a median income of $70,949 versus $48,913 for females. The per capita income for the county was $40,682. About 3.4% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.8% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[26]

Politics

Delaware County is considered a Republican stronghold, and has been so for most of the party's history.[27] The only Democratic president candidate to win the county from 1856 to the present day was Woodrow Wilson in his 1912 & 1916 electoral victories. However, in 2020 Joe Biden came within single digits of flipping the county, the closest result since Lyndon Johnson’s landslide victory in 1964.

United States presidential election results for Delaware County, Ohio[28]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 66,356 52.51% 57,735 45.69% 2,283 1.81%
2016 57,568 54.50% 40,872 38.69% 7,199 6.81%
2012 60,194 60.86% 37,292 37.71% 1,413 1.43%
2008 54,778 59.17% 36,653 39.59% 1,150 1.24%
2004 53,143 66.05% 27,048 33.62% 265 0.33%
2000 36,639 66.13% 17,134 30.93% 1,630 2.94%
1996 24,123 58.25% 13,463 32.51% 3,829 9.25%
1992 18,225 49.43% 9,263 25.12% 9,385 25.45%
1988 20,693 72.61% 7,590 26.63% 215 0.75%
1984 19,050 76.23% 5,773 23.10% 166 0.66%
1980 14,740 64.48% 6,417 28.07% 1,704 7.45%
1976 12,285 61.88% 7,058 35.55% 510 2.57%
1972 12,950 72.40% 4,452 24.89% 484 2.71%
1968 9,029 57.72% 4,056 25.93% 2,559 16.36%
1964 8,395 50.96% 8,080 49.04% 0 0.00%
1960 11,391 68.11% 5,334 31.89% 0 0.00%
1956 10,739 72.88% 3,997 27.12% 0 0.00%
1952 10,682 71.59% 4,239 28.41% 0 0.00%
1948 8,089 64.68% 4,371 34.95% 46 0.37%
1944 9,186 66.78% 4,569 33.22% 0 0.00%
1940 9,570 62.81% 5,666 37.19% 0 0.00%
1936 7,364 50.06% 7,045 47.90% 300 2.04%
1932 6,833 51.38% 6,196 46.59% 271 2.04%
1928 8,049 67.75% 3,720 31.31% 111 0.93%
1924 6,731 60.41% 3,537 31.74% 874 7.84%
1920 7,700 59.21% 5,241 40.30% 63 0.48%
1916 3,461 46.97% 3,754 50.95% 153 2.08%
1912 2,584 35.32% 2,934 40.10% 1,798 24.58%
1908 4,007 52.77% 3,330 43.86% 256 3.37%
1904 4,163 58.82% 2,607 36.83% 308 4.35%
1900 3,765 51.40% 3,337 45.56% 223 3.04%
1896 3,789 50.39% 3,612 48.04% 118 1.57%
1892 3,267 49.16% 2,710 40.78% 668 10.05%
1888 3,432 49.66% 3,004 43.47% 475 6.87%
1884 3,513 50.55% 3,078 44.29% 359 5.17%
1880 3,508 52.90% 2,968 44.75% 156 2.35%
1876 3,237 52.22% 2,809 45.31% 153 2.47%
1872 2,713 54.72% 2,013 40.60% 232 4.68%
1868 2,976 57.84% 2,169 42.16% 0 0.00%
1864 2,900 60.28% 1,911 39.72% 0 0.00%
1860 2,699 56.94% 1,967 41.50% 74 1.56%
1856 2,367 55.75% 1,649 38.84% 230 5.42%


Education

The following school districts are located in Delaware County.

1 Mainly in Knox County, with portions in Delaware County
2 Mainly in Franklin County, with portions in Delaware County and Union County
3 Mainly in Marion County, with portions in Delaware County
4 Mainly in Morrow County, with portions in Delaware County
5 Mainly in Licking County, with portions in Delaware County
6 Mainly in Union County, with portions in Delaware County
7 Mainly in Franklin County, with portions in Delaware County

The Ohio Wesleyan University, located in Delaware, Ohio, is one of the top liberal arts colleges in the United States and one of the Five Colleges of Ohio.

Transportation

Major Highways

Airports

The area is served by the Delaware Municipal Airport,[29] which serves the rapidly developing southern Delaware County area and the north portion of the Franklin County and Columbus areas. The airport contains a 5,000 foot runway, flight terminal, lounges, and weather briefing areas. It is home to approximately 80 aircraft and an estimated 40,000 operations take place per year. Several smaller airports are located in the county.

Media

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The Delaware Gazette, a morning daily founded in 1885, is the dominant local newspaper in Delaware County, while the Sunbury News, a weekly community newspaper, serves eastern Delaware County and residents of the Big Walnut Local School District. Both publications are owned by Brown Publishing Company.

Additional local print publications include ThisWeek Delaware News, which covers the city of Delaware and the villages of Galena and Sunbury; and ThisWeek Olentangy Valley News, which covers Powell and the Olentangy Local School District. Both weekly papers are among 21 published by ThisWeek Community News, headquartered in southern Delaware County. ThisWeek is owned by GateHouse Media, which also owns the Columbus Dispatch. The Village of Shawnee Hills in southwestern Delaware County is served by a monthly newspaper - The Village Gazette. The Village Gazette is independent.

Other local publications include the Transcript, the student paper at Ohio Wesleyan University.

Points of interest

Delaware, Ohio is famous for The Little Brown Jug, an internationally famous harness race which is part of the Triple Crown of harness racing.

The Methodist Theological School in Ohio is the Methodist graduate school seminary located between Delaware and Columbus, Ohio. It is often referred to as METHESCO.

Additional notable places include:

Communities

Map of Delaware County, Ohio with Municipal and Township Labels
Map of Delaware County, Ohio with Municipal and Township Labels

Cities

Villages

Census-designated places

Townships

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Unincorporated communities

Notable residents

Notable people who have lived in or been associated with the county include:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Delaware County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Retrieved 2014-05-11.
  2. ^ "Delaware County data (population)". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. Retrieved 2007-05-10.[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ 2020 census
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. ^ "Delaware County". Ohio History Central. Ohio Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-05-11.
  6. ^ "Richest counties in the US: Here's where household incomes in each state are the highest". USA Today. USA Today. Retrieved 4 January 2021.
  7. ^ "These are the richest counties in US". The Columbus Dispatch. The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved 4 January 2021.
  8. ^ "History of Delaware". City of Delaware. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  9. ^ "'Act establishing the county of Delaware'". Ohio History Connection. February 10, 1808. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  10. ^ "America's Best Places To Raise A Family". Forbes. June 30, 2008.
  11. ^ "Delaware County, Ohio". Niche. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  12. ^ "Healthiest Communities in the U.S." US News. June 29, 2021. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  13. ^ Stebbins, Samuel. "Delaware County, Ohio is One of the Best Paces to Live in the United States". 24/7 Wall Street. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  14. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  15. ^ Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A., eds. (1879). "Delaware, the name of five counties in the United States. III. A central county of Ohio" . The American Cyclopædia.
  16. ^ a b "Alum Creek State Park". Archived from the original on 2007-06-30. Retrieved 2007-09-12.
  17. ^ a b "Delaware State Park". Retrieved 2014-05-11.
  18. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  19. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  20. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  21. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  22. ^ 2020 census
  23. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  24. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  25. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  26. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  27. ^ Chinni, Dante; Davis, Bob (20 July 2016). "Donald Trump Divides Republicans in Key Ohio County". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  28. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-05-01.
  29. ^ a b "Delaware Airport". Archived from the original on 2007-08-26. Retrieved 2007-09-12.
  30. ^ "End of the Road for Germain Amphitheater?". Archived from the original on 2011-05-23. Retrieved 2008-05-19.
  31. ^ "News & Media - Ohio Wesleyan University". Ohio Wesleyan University.
  32. ^ "Delaware Ohio Landmark Adds Hours". delawareohrealestate.com. 5 September 2010. Archived from the original on 7 September 2010. Retrieved 10 January 2011.
  33. ^ http://drc.owu.edu/handle/2374.OWES/759[permanent dead link]
  34. ^ "Home". The Strand Theatre.

Further reading

Coordinates: 40°17′N 83°01′W / 40.28°N 83.01°W / 40.28; -83.01