Euclid, Ohio
City of Euclid
Old City Hall of Euclid, faced with Euclid bluestone.
Old City Hall of Euclid, faced with Euclid bluestone.
Flag of Euclid, Ohio
Location in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio
Location in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio
Location of Ohio in the United States
Location of Ohio in the United States
Coordinates: 41°35′44″N 81°31′9″W / 41.59556°N 81.51917°W / 41.59556; -81.51917Coordinates: 41°35′44″N 81°31′9″W / 41.59556°N 81.51917°W / 41.59556; -81.51917
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyCuyahoga
Founded1796[1]
Incorporated1903 (village)[1]
 1930 (city)[1]
Government
 • TypeMayor-Council
 • MayorKirsten Holzheimer (D)
 • City Council
Members' List
Area
 • Total11.48 sq mi (29.74 km2)
 • Land10.65 sq mi (27.60 km2)
 • Water0.83 sq mi (2.14 km2)
Elevation
617 ft (188 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total49,692
 • Density4,663.73/sq mi (1,800.65/km2)
DemonymEuclidean
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Zip Code
44117, 44119, 44123, 44132, 44143
Area code216
FIPS code39-25704[3]
GNIS feature ID1072210[4]
Websitewww.cityofeuclid.com

Euclid is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. It is an inner ring suburb of Cleveland. As of the 2020 census, the city had a total population of 49,692.[5][6]

History

The City of Euclid was originally a part of Euclid Township, first mapped in 1796 and named for Euclid of Alexandria, the ancient Greek mathematician.[7] The first sparse settlement in the township began in 1798, with major settlement beginning in the spring of 1804. The first settlers in what is now the City of Euclid were Joseph Burke, David Dille and William Coleman, and their families. Following the Civil War the lake plain of Euclid Township was known for numerous excellent vineyards. Euclid Village incorporated out of the northeast portion of the township in 1903. It developed as an industrial center in the early 20th century, and became a city in 1930.

Geography

Euclid is located at 41°35′44″N 81°31′9″W / 41.59556°N 81.51917°W / 41.59556; -81.51917 (41.595563, -81.519176).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.48 square miles (29.73 km2), of which 10.63 square miles (27.53 km2) is land and 0.85 square miles (2.20 km2) is water.[9] It is on the shore of Lake Erie, with a beachfront area along its north edge.

Bordering Euclid are Cleveland on the west, South Euclid and Richmond Heights on the south, Willowick, Wickliffe, and Willoughby Hills on the east, and Lake Erie on the north.

It is part of the Lake Erie Snowbelt region, prone to snow squalls blowing off Lake Erie, particularly before the lake freezes over in winter.

City facts

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The Charter is: Mayor and Council - eight councilors and one council president.

Its assessed valuation is $825,325,160. There are 150 companies in the city.

Transportation

The city contains 143.065 miles (230.241 km) of streets; 3.06 miles (4.92 km) of Interstate 90, 1.65 miles (2.66 km) of south spur, 262.38 miles (422.26 km) of sewers, 139.65 miles (224.74 km) of water mains, three railroads; the CSX and Norfolk Southern Railway and one bus line; Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. Amtrak operates its Lake Shore Limited service between Chicago, Cleveland, New York and Boston twice daily, but does not stop in Euclid.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19101,953
19203,36372.2%
193012,751279.2%
194017,86640.1%
195041,396131.7%
196062,99852.2%
197071,55213.6%
198059,999−16.1%
199054,875−8.5%
200052,717−3.9%
201048,920−7.2%
202049,6921.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1910[11] 1930[12] 1960[13] 1990[14]
2010[15] 2020[16]

2020 census

Euclid city, Ohio – Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[15] Pop 2020[16] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 21,101 14,649 43.13% 29.48%
Black or African American alone (NH) 25,522 31,562 52.17% 63.52%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 94 80 0.19% 0.16%
Asian alone (NH) 354 314 0.72% 0.63%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 3 6 0.01% 0.01%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 70 297 0.14% 0.60%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 1,007 1,736 2.06% 3.49%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 769 1,048 1.57% 2.11%
Total 48,920 49,692 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2010 census

As of the census[17] of 2010, there were 48,920 people, 22,685 households, and 12,187 families living in the city. The population density was 4,602.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,776.9/km2). There were 26,037 housing units at an average density of 2,449.4 per square mile (945.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 43.8% White, 52.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population.

There were 22,685 households, of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 28.4% were married couples living together, 20.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 46.3% were non-families. 41.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.13 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the city was 61 years. 22.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.3% were from 25 to 44; 28.9% were from 45 to 64; and 15.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 44.8% male and 55.2% female.

2000 census

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 52,717 people, 24,353 households, the 13,491 families living in the city. The population density was 4,923.2 people per square mile (1,900.5/km2). There were 26,123 housing units at an average density of 2,439.6 per square mile (941.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.36% White, 30.57% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.94% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.15% of the population.

There were 24,353 households, out of which 24.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.3% were married couples living together, 15.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.6% were non-families. 39.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 22.3% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 19.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,151, and the median income for a family was $45,278. Males had a median income of $35,914 versus $28,528 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,664. About 7.1% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.9% of those under age 18 and 11.2% of those age 65 or over.

91.8% spoke English, 1.8% Spanish, 1.3% Croatian, 1.2% Slovene, and 0.62% Italian as their first language.[18]

Notable attractions/history

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Workers in Euclid during World War II
Workers in Euclid during World War II

Transportation

Ethnic groups

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Euclid is home to a variety of ethnic groups. One of the largest is the city's historic Slovene population. There are a number of streets in Euclid that commemorate the Slovenian influence on Euclid, including Recher, Mavec, Drenik, Grdina, Trebec, Mozina, Kapel, and Ljubljana.[24] Today, Euclid's largest ethnic population is African American, while also containing sizeable populations of Croats, Irish and Italian communities.

Education

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Euclid City Schools is the local school district. Euclid High School is the local public high school.

There was previously a Catholic school of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cleveland, St. Robert Bellarmine School. It closed in 2008, and that year it only had 136 students.[25]

Our Lady of the Lake, a Roman Catholic middle school and church, is located on Lakeshore Boulevard.

Saints Robert and William Catholic School, also a Roman Catholic middle school and church, is located on East 260th Street.

Notable people

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See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "City of Euclid: Statistics". www.cityofeuclid.com. Archived from the original on 12 March 2018. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  2. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 20, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Euclid city, Ohio". Retrieved 2021-10-22.
  6. ^ "Euclid city, Ohio". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 15, 2022.
  7. ^ Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. pp. 43–44.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  10. ^ "Decennial Census of Population and Housing by Decades". US Census Bureau.
  11. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  12. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  13. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. 1960. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  14. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  15. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Euclid city, Ohio". United States Census Bureau.
  16. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Euclid city, Ohio". United States Census Bureau.
  17. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  18. ^ "Statistics" (PDF). www.mla.org. 2000. Retrieved 2019-07-27.
  19. ^ "City of Euclid, Ohio -- History". Archived from the original on 2007-05-03. Retrieved 2018-12-08.
  20. ^ "Greater Cleveland Slo-Pitch Softball Hall of Fame". Softball Museum. Retrieved 2021-02-11.
  21. ^ "Duplex radio communication and signaling apparatus for portable telephone extension". google.com. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  22. ^ "Lincoln Electric installs wind turbine made by Kenersys Group of Germany". cleveland.com. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  23. ^ "Euclid Creek Reservation". www.clevelandmetroparks.com. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  24. ^ Gobetz, Edward. "Edward Gobetz at Euclid Slovenian Day". Clevelandpeople.com. Magnum Computer Inc. Retrieved 5 September 2020.
  25. ^ Lowers, Deborah (2008-01-10). "St. Robert School to close". The News Herald. Willoughby, Ohio. Retrieved 2020-05-29.
  26. ^ Appel, JM. Phoning Home, Introductory Matter, Third Edition, 2014
  27. ^ Cleveland Plain Dealer, 12 July 2008
  28. ^ "Marie McMillin Obituary". The Sandusky Register. 30 July 1954. p. 1. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  29. ^ "...And Call Me Roger": The Literary Life of Roger Zelazny, Part 4, by Christopher S. Kovacs. In: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4: Last Exit to Babylon, NESFA Press, 2009.