First Lady of Guinea
Flag of Guinea.svg
Incumbent
Lauriane Doumbouya
since September 5, 2021
ResidencePresidential Palace, Conakry
Inaugural holderAndrée Touré
FormationOctober 2, 1958
WebsitePrésidence de la République: La Premiere Dame

First Lady of Guinea (French: Première Dame de la République de Guinée) is the title attributed to the wife of the President of Guinea.[1] The country's present first lady is Lauriane Doumbouya, wife of interim President Mamady Doumbouya, who had held the position since the 2021 Guinean coup d'etat on September 5, 2021.[2] There has been no first gentleman of Guinea to date.

First Ladies of Guinea

Names Portrait Term Began Term Ended President of Guinea Image of President Notes
Andrée Touré October 2, 1958 March 26, 1984 Ahmed Sékou Touré Born Marie-Andrée Duplantier, Andrée Touré married Ahmed Sékou Touré in 1953. She became Guinea's inaugural first lady upon the country's independence in 1958.[3]
Delphine Béavogui March 26, 1984 April 3, 1984 Louis Lansana Beavogui Louis Lansana Beavogui served as interim president following President Ahmed Sékou Touré's death. Delphine Béavogui died on August 28, 2018, at the age of 87.[4][5]
Henriette Conté April 5, 1984 December 22, 2008 Lansana Conté President Lansana Conté, who came to power in the 1984 Guinean coup d'état, was polygamous and had four wives.[6][7][8]
  • Henriette Conté held the position of First Lady of Guinea during Lansana Conté's presidency.[7] She died from a heart attack in Kaporo, Conakry, on May 12, 2020.[9][10][11][12][13][14]
  • Kadiatou Seth Conté [fr], President Conté's second wife, is a former Miss Guinea beauty pageant winner.[7] By 2003, Kadiatou Seth Conté was living abroad, away from President Conté, in Morocco with their eight children, though the relationship had reportedly begun to improve at the time.[7][15]
  • Lansana Conté's third wife, Asmaou Bah Conté [fr], a member of the Peule people, had one son with Conté.[7] During the president's declining health in 2003, Bah Conté reportedly lived in a home on Conakry's Corniche under the guard of the country's Red Brigades.[7]
  • Mamadie Touré is Lansana Conté's fourth and youngest wife, having married the president during the 2000s.[8] Her name is mentioned in numerous documents during an investigation into the $2.5 billion mining rights to the Simandou iron ore mine, which was obtained by Beny Steinmetz and his BSGR company.[8] Mamadie Touré agreed to cooperate with American prosecutors and the FBI as a witness during its corruption probe.[8][16] She lived in Jacksonville, Florida, as of 2013.[8]
Position vacant December 24, 2008 December 3, 2009 Moussa Dadis Camara Captain Moussa Dadis Camara came to power in the 2008 Guinean coup d'état after Lansana Conté's death. Camara went into exile in Burkina Faso in January 2010 following an assassination attempt and settled in Ouagadougou with his girlfriend, Jeanne Saba [fr], a Burkinabe national.[17] Moussa Dadis Camara married Jeanne Saba on August 22, 2010, and converted to Saba's religion, Roman Catholicism, on the same day as their wedding.[18] Saba and Camara had two children by 2012.[17]
? December 3, 2009 December 21, 2010 Sékouba Konaté (acting) Konaté wed Mariama Sako Hall Konaté [fr], though it is unclear if they were married during his tenure in office.
Djene Kaba Condé
Djene Kaba Conde.jpg
December 21, 2010 September 5, 2021 Alpha Condé Overthrow in 2021 Guinean coup d'état
Lauriane Doumbouya September 5, 2021 Present Mamady Doumbouya Incumbent first lady since September 2021

References

  1. ^ "Présidence de la République de Guinée: La Premiere Dame". Présidence de la République de Guinée. Archived from the original on 2019-11-13. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  2. ^ "Guinée : qui est Lauriane Doumbouya, la nouvelle première dame ? – Jeune Afrique". JeuneAfrique.com (in French). Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  3. ^ Juompan-Yakam, Clarisse (2012-11-20). "Que sont devenues les veuves des anciens présidents africains?". Jeune Afrique. Archived from the original on 2020-05-22. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  4. ^ "Page Noire: Delphine Béavogui, l'épouse de l'ex-PM Lansana Béavogui, s'en est allée". Guineenews.org. 2018-08-28. Archived from the original on 2018-08-29. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  5. ^ "Mme Delphine Lansana Béavogui n'est plus". Guinee Actuelle. 2018-08-28. Archived from the original on 2020-05-22. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  6. ^ Sillah, Alhassan (2007-01-22). "Guinea's strongman feels the heat". BBC News. Archived from the original on 2019-07-24. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Yérim Seck, Cheikh (2003-03-25). "Ambiance de fin de règne". Jeune Afrique. Archived from the original on 2020-05-22. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  8. ^ a b c d e Cobain, Ian; Hirsch, Afua (2013-07-30). "The tycoon, the dictator's wife and the $2.5bn Guinea mining deal". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2018-03-14. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  9. ^ Boundou Sylla, Youssouf (2020-05-12). "Henriette Conté, l'épouse de l'ex président guinéen est décédée, à Conakry". Guineenews.org. Archived from the original on 2020-05-20. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  10. ^ Celestin, Louis (2020-05-13). "Décès de Henriette Conté : réactions croisées de Fodé Bangoura et de Aboubacar Soumah". Guineenews.org. Archived from the original on 2020-05-20. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  11. ^ Conde, Heinan (2020-05-13). "Guinée: décès à Conakry de l'ancienne première dame Henriette Conté". Affiches Guinéennes. Archived from the original on 2020-05-22. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  12. ^ "Guinée: Décès de l'ex-Première dame Henriette Conté". Vonews Afrique. 2020-05-13. Archived from the original on 2020-05-18. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  13. ^ "Décès de Henriette Conté: "Cette dame était d'une pureté extraordinaire", dixit Kabinet Komara, ancien premier ministre". Guinee7.com. 2020-05-13. Archived from the original on 2020-05-20. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  14. ^ "Décès de Mme Henriette Conté: les beaux souvenirs de Boubacar Yacine Diallo". Guineematin. 2020-05-13. Archived from the original on 2020-05-18. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  15. ^ Camara, Elisa (2017-09-04). "Kadiatou Seth, épouse de l'ex-président Conté en deuil: Mohamed, son frère aîné, n'est plus". Mediaguinee. Archived from the original on 2020-05-22. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  16. ^ Sharife, Khadija (2016-04-04). "Panama Papers: Steinmetz Guinea deal pried open". The Times (South Africa). Archived from the original on 2019-04-13. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  17. ^ a b Mieu, Baudelaire (2012-04-03). "Guinée – Burkina: Dadis cool, en villégiature à Ouaga". Jeune Afrique. Archived from the original on 2018-09-24. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  18. ^ Réveillard, Marie-France (2017-06-15). "Dadis Camara peut-il rentrer en Guinée?". La Afrique Tribune. Archived from the original on 2019-07-12. Retrieved 2020-05-22.