This is a list of political scandals in the United Kingdom in chronological order. Scandals implicating political figures or governments of the UK, often reported in the mass media, have long had repercussions for their popularity. Issues in political scandals have included alleged or proven financial and sexual matters,[1] or various other allegations or actions taken by politicians that led to controversy.[2][3][4] In British media and political discourse, such scandals have sometimes been referred to as political sleaze since the 1990s.[4] Notable scandals include the Marconi scandal, Profumo affair and the 2009 expenses scandal.

1890s

1910s

1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2017

2018

2020s

2020

2021

2022

References

  1. ^ Tumber, Howard (1 April 2004). "Scandal and Media in the United Kingdom: From Major to Blair". American Behavioral Scientist. 47 (8): 1122–1137. doi:10.1177/0002764203262280. ISSN 0002-7642. S2CID 143754751.
  2. ^ "Politicians Behaving Badly: 7 British Government Scandals". Masterpiece. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  3. ^ Castle, Stephen (13 August 2021). "Latest U.K. Scandals Show a System Rife With Insider Ties". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  4. ^ a b "What does 'sleaze' mean when politicians use it?". BBC News. 5 November 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  5. ^ "LIBERATOR BUILDING SOCIETY SCANDALS". PapersPast. Retrieved 10 January 2013.
  6. ^ "About The Marconi Scandal". Bloomsbury Publishing. Retrieved 10 January 2013.
  7. ^ "David Lloyd George". Britannica. Retrieved 10 January 2013.
  8. ^ "Budget Leaks". BBC Democracy. 7 August 2008. Retrieved 10 January 2013.
  9. ^ "The Suez Crisis". BBC History. Retrieved 10 January 2013.
  10. ^ Brown, Derek (12 April 2001). "1963: The Profumo scandal". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  11. ^ "1986: Heseltine quits over Westland". BBC. 9 January 1986. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  12. ^ Tatchell, Peter (1997). "An Outing Too Far". Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  13. ^ Popham, Peter (7 January 1997). "Back to basics of vaudeville". The Independent. London.
  14. ^ Wintour, Patrick (10 March 2003). "Ron Davies ends political career". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 29 July 2009.
  15. ^ "Beverley Hughes". BBC News. 16 October 2002. Retrieved 2 April 2007.
  16. ^ "McLetchie resigns as Tory leader". BBC News. BBC. 31 October 2005. Retrieved 29 July 2009.
  17. ^ "Oaten resigns over rent boy claim". BBC News. BBC. 21 January 2006. Retrieved 29 July 2009.
  18. ^ Owen, Richard (27 February 2006). "Q&A: Tessa Jowell and the Berlusconi affair". The Times. London. Retrieved 29 July 2009.
  19. ^ Popham, Peter (2 March 2006). "Jowellgate: Italian judge will press charges over bribery allegations". The Independent. London. Retrieved 29 July 2009.
  20. ^ "Labour loans to be investigated". BBC News. 15 March 2006.
  21. ^ Page, Cara (8 April 2007). "SLEAZE MP: MY SHAME AT 3-IN-BED TEEN SEX SCANDAL". Daily Record.
  22. ^ "Concern over secret Labour donor". BBC News. 25 November 2007.
  23. ^ "Labour boss quits over donations". BBC News. 26 November 2007.
  24. ^ "Hain quits jobs 'to clear name'". BBC News. 24 January 2007.
  25. ^ "Tory MP Conway faces suspension". BBC News. 28 January 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2008.
  26. ^ "Timeline of events surrounding Red Sky and housing body". BBC News. 7 July 2011. Retrieved 8 May 2022.
  27. ^ "Huhne and Pryce sent to prison". BBC News. 11 March 2013.
  28. ^ Booth, Robert (19 December 2012). "Andrew Mitchell row – timeline". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  29. ^ "Labour refers Falkirk row to police". 5 July 2013. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  30. ^ "Maria Miller row: Cameron faces questions, Labour says". BBC News. 5 April 2014. Retrieved 6 April 2014.
  31. ^ "Miliband: Thornberry's 'white van, flag' tweet lacked respect". BBC News. 21 November 2014. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  32. ^ Taylor, Adam (20 November 2014). "How this seemingly innocuous tweet forced a British MP to resign". The Washington Post.
  33. ^ "Nama NI deal: The key figures and the background you need to know". BBC News. 24 September 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2022.
  34. ^ Kirkup, James (21 September 2015). "A pig, some drugs and a disappointed billionaire: the life of David Cameron". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  35. ^ Beijing, Rowena Mason Tom Phillips in (21 September 2015). "Cameron biography: Ashcroft makes new debauchery claims about student days". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  36. ^ "NHS blood scandal a 'criminal cover-up'". BBC News. 26 April 2017.
  37. ^ Harpin, Lee (22 July 2017). "Victims of contaminated blood scandal weren't given Tory compensation". Daily Mirror.
  38. ^ "RHI scandal: RHI 'cash for ash' scandal to cost NI taxpayers £490m". BBC News. 23 December 2016. Retrieved 8 May 2022.
  39. ^ Olusoga, David (16 June 2019). "Windrush: archived documents show the long betrayal". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  40. ^ "'Cummings effect' led to loss of confidence in UK Government". UCL News. 7 August 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  41. ^ Bland, Archie (6 August 2020). "The Cummings effect: study finds public faith was lost after aide's trip". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  42. ^ a b "Alex Salmond says there is 'no doubt' Nicola Sturgeon broke ministerial code". BBC News. 26 February 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  43. ^ a b "The Alex Salmond inquiry and the political stink at Holyrood". BBC News. 24 February 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  44. ^ "Salmond and Sturgeon: How the best of political double acts fell apart". BBC News. 26 February 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  45. ^ Powell, Rob (12 April 2021). "Greensill: What is the lobbying scandal and why is David Cameron involved?". Sky News. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  46. ^ Hutchinson, Emma (25 June 2021). "Prime Minister accepts Health Secretary Matt Hancock's apology and 'considers the matter closed". ITV News.
  47. ^ Harrison, Emma (27 June 2021). "Matt Hancock quits as health secretary after breaking social distance guidance". BBC News.
  48. ^ "UK health chief caught in embrace that broke COVID rules". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 5 July 2021. The United Kingdom was gripped by a political scandal on Friday as a tabloid newspaper published images of health chief Matt Hancock kissing an aide – an embrace that broke social-distancing rules.
  49. ^ Culbertson, Alix; McGuinness, Alan (8 January 2023). "Westminster Accounts: How the Owen Paterson scandal blew open the debate over MPs' second jobs". Sky News. Retrieved 28 April 2023.
  50. ^ Monaghan, Chris; Bhattacharya, Caroline; Meakin, Alexandra (16 November 2021). "The Owen Paterson Scandal: Standards, Trust and Democratic Norms | The Political Studies Association (PSA)". Political Studies Association. Retrieved 28 April 2023.
  51. ^ Capurro, Daniel (10 December 2021). "Would you follow stricter Covid rules after Downing Street party scandal? Almost half wouldn't". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  52. ^ "Police warning over Covid compliance after Downing Street Christmas party scandal". The Independent. 12 December 2021. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  53. ^ "Boris Johnson's staff denied there was a 2020 Christmas party — except they joked about it on camera". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  54. ^ McGee, Luke; Goillandeau, Martin (30 April 2022). "UK Conservative politician resigns after admitting watching porn in Parliament". CNN.
  55. ^ "Tory MP Chris Pincher suspended by party over 'drunken groping' claims". Sky News. 2 July 2022.
  56. ^ "Boris Johnson was made aware of formal Chris Pincher complaint". BBC News. 5 July 2022.