British Women's Social and Political Union lapel pin

This list of suffragists and suffragettes includes noted individuals active in the worldwide women's suffrage movement who have campaigned or strongly advocated for women's suffrage, the organisations which they formed or joined, and the publications which publicized – and, in some nations, continue to publicize – their goals. Suffragists and suffragettes, often members of different groups and societies, used or use differing tactics. "Suffragette" in the British usage denotes a more "militant" type of campaigner, while suffragettes in the United States organized such nonviolent events as the Suffrage Hikes, the Woman Suffrage Procession of 1913, and the Silent Sentinels.

Madelin "Madge" Breckinridge
Gertrude Foster Brown
Carrie Chapman Catt
Matilda Joslyn Gage
Statue of Esther Hobart Morris, located at the front exterior of the Wyoming State Capitol
Statue of Esther Hobart Morris, located at the front exterior of the Wyoming State Capitol
Anna Howard Shaw
Sojourner Truth
Victoria Woodhull

Argentina

Australia

Edith Cowan

Austria

Bahamas

Barbados

Belgium

Brazil

Bulgaria

Canada

Edith Archibald

Chile

China

Colombia

Czech Republic (Czechoslovakia)

Denmark

Matilde Bajer
Eline Hansen

Egypt

El Salvador

Finland

France

Marguerite Durand

Georgia

Germany

Bust of Clara Zetkin
Bust of Clara Zetkin
Leaders of the women's movement in Germany, 1894
Leaders of the women's movement in Germany, 1894

Greece

Haiti

Honduras

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran

Ireland

Constance Markievicz

Italy

Japan

Jordan

Liechtenstein

Mexico

Moçambique

Netherlands

Newfoundland

New Zealand

Kate Sheppard

See also

List of New Zealand suffragists

Nicaragua

Nigeria

Norway

Panama

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Romania

Serbia

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Signe Bergman

Switzerland

Trinidad

United Kingdom

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson
Frances Buss
Mabel Capper (3rd from right, with petition) and fellow suffragettes, 1910
Mabel Capper (3rd from right, with petition) and fellow suffragettes, 1910
Millicent Fawcett
Lilian Lenton
Kathleen Lyttelton
Harriet Taylor Mill
Christabel Pankhurst
Ethel Smyth
Beatrice Webb
Rebecca West
Margaret McPhun
Margaret McPhun
Dr Elizabeth Pace
Dr Elizabeth Pace
Bundesarchiv Bild 102-09812, Jessie Stephen no-text
Bundesarchiv Bild 102-09812, Jessie Stephen no-text
Jessie Newbery
Jessie Newbery

United States

See also

United States Virgin Islands

Uruguay

Venezuela

Yishuv

Major suffrage organizations

Women's suffrage publications

Back cover of The Woman Citizen magazine from 19 Jan 1918
Back cover of The Woman Citizen magazine from 19 Jan 1918

See also

References

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