Ameena Ahmad Ahuja
Born
India
Alma materSlade School of Art
OccupationPainter
Calligrapher
Linguist
Writer
Known forCalligraphic paintings
Spouse(s)Vishnu Ahuja
Parent(s)Nuruddin Ahmed
AwardsPadma Shri
WebsiteWebsite

Ameena Ahmad Ahuja is an Indian painter, calligrapher, writer and linguist, known for her Urdu poetry-inspired art works.[1]

Biography

Ameena Ahmad Ahuja was born to a British mother and Nuruddin Ahmed, a barrister and litterateur. She did her training in art at the Slade School of Art in London.[2] She is a former member of faculty of the Department of Russian at the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)[2] and, besides Russian, she is proficient in languages such as Persian, German, French, Hindi and English.[1] Her career also covered stints at Columbia University as a lecturer of poetry and as an Artist-in-residence at the Harvard University and her exhibitions have been staged at many places in India[3] and abroad including Moscow, Tokyo, Venezuela, Columbia and New York.[4] She has served as the official translator during the visits of Soviet dignitaries including Alexei Kosygin, Nikolai Bulganin, Nikita Khrushchev and Leonid Brezhnev to India.[1]

She was married to Vishnu Ahuja, a diplomat and former ambassador to the USSR and had opportunities to visit many countries, accompanying her husband, who has since died.[1]

Publications

She is the author of the book, Calligraphy in Islam, a text in Urdu, published 2009 by Penguin India.[5]

Awards and honours

The Government of India awarded her the fourth highest civilian honour of the Padma Shri, in 2009, for her contributions to Arts.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Calligraphying Poetry on Canvas". The South Asian. April 2005. Archived from the original on 3 February 2017. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Amazing synthesis of art, poetry". The Hindu. 17 May 2007. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  3. ^ "Animal verse". India Today. 5 March 2001. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  4. ^ "Ameena Ahmad Ahuja donates 33 paintings to Jamia Millia Islamia". One India. 16 May 2007. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  5. ^ Ameena Ahmed Ahuja (2009). Calligraphy in Islam. Penguin India. p. 120. ISBN 9780670082605.
  6. ^ "Padma Awards" (PDF). Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 3 January 2016.

Further reading