Charlotte County
Charlotte County Courthouse in September 2014
Charlotte County Courthouse in September 2014
Map of Virginia highlighting Charlotte County
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°01′N 78°40′W / 37.01°N 78.66°W / 37.01; -78.66
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded1764
Named forQueen Charlotte
SeatCharlotte Court House
Largest townKeysville
Area
 • Total478 sq mi (1,240 km2)
 • Land475 sq mi (1,230 km2)
 • Water2.2 sq mi (6 km2)  0.5%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total11,529
 • Density24/sq mi (9.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district5th
Websitewww.charlotteva.com

Charlotte County is a United States county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Charlotte Court House.[1] As of the 2020 census, the county population was 11,529.[2] Charlotte County is predominantly rural with a population density of only 26.5 persons per square mile.

History

Red Hill Patrick Henry National Memorial in Charlotte County, the final resting place of Patrick Henry
Red Hill Patrick Henry National Memorial in Charlotte County, the final resting place of Patrick Henry

European settlement of the future county began in the early 18th century,[3] and early settlers included mostly English people, with some French Huguenots, and Scotch-Irish.[4], and a modest population of Germans. After approximately fifty years of European settlement, the House of Burgesses established and incorporated Charlotte County in 1764 from part of Lunenburg County. The new county was named in honor of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the Queen and wife of King George III of Great Britain.[5] The county residents later became staunch supporters of independence and the American Revolution, and Founding Father Patrick Henry was one of its most famous residents. His grave and the national memorial dedicated to him are located in Charlotte County. Residents of Charlotte County were heavily involved in the American Revolution. County delegates supported resolutions against the Stamp Act of 1765,[4] and the county government was the second governing body to declare independence from English rule.[3] In addition, Charlotte militia units fought under General Robert Lawson during the Yorktown campaign, which effectively led to the end of the American War of Independence.[4] Finally, the final resting place and national memorial to revolutionary hero Patrick Henry is at Red Hill Plantation.[6]

Charlotte County has also played a role in other wars on American soil. An artillery company from Charlotte played a key role in the Battle of Craney Island during the War of 1812.[4] Also, a significant battle in the American Civil War occurred in Charlotte and Halifax counties during the Battle of Staunton River Bridge, which resulted in a victory for the Confederacy.[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 478 square miles (1,240 km2), of which 475 square miles (1,230 km2) is land and 2.2 square miles (5.7 km2) (0.5%) is water.[7] The county is bounded on the southwest by the Roanoke River, locally known as the "Staunton River". The terrain is hilly.[8]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179010,078
180011,91218.2%
181013,16110.5%
182013,2901.0%
183015,25214.8%
184014,595−4.3%
185013,955−4.4%
186014,4713.7%
187014,5130.3%
188016,65314.7%
189015,077−9.5%
190015,3431.8%
191015,7852.9%
192017,54011.1%
193016,061−8.4%
194015,861−1.2%
195014,057−11.4%
196013,368−4.9%
197011,551−13.6%
198012,2666.2%
199011,688−4.7%
200012,4726.7%
201012,5860.9%
202011,529−8.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790–1960[10] 1900–1990[11]
1990–2000[12] 2010[13] 2020[14]

2020 census

Charlotte County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[13] Pop 2020[14] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 8,383 7,677 66.61% 66.59%
Black or African American alone (NH) 3,739 3,140 29.71% 27.24%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 31 18 0.25% 0.16%
Asian alone (NH) 26 23 0.21% 0.20%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 6 0.00% 0.05%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 14 35 0.11% 0.30%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 153 377 1.22% 3.27%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 240 253 1.91% 2.19%
Total 12,586 11,529 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.


2000 Census

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 12,472 people, 4,951 households, and 3,435 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km2). There were 5,734 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 65.51% White, 32.89% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.70% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. 1.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,951 households, out of which 28.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.50% were married couples living together, 13.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.60% were non-families. 27.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the age distribution of the population shows 24.30% under the age of 18, 7.20% from 18 to 24, 26.20% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 17.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,929, and the median income for a family was $34,830. Males had a median income of $26,918 versus $20,307 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,717. About 12.70% of families and 18.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.10% of those under age 18 and 20.80% of those age 65 or over.

Elected officials

Board of Supervisors


The Board of Supervisors is the legislative policy making body for the county. It considers and adopts policies regarding administration, budget, finance, economic development, health, planning, public safety, childcare, recreation, sanitation and waste removal. The Board appropriates funds for all functions, including the schools, Social Services, Law Enforcement and operation of courts. The Board's regularly scheduled meetings are held on the second Tuesday of each month at 1:30 pm in the Board of Supervisors Room of the County Administration Building, 250 LeGrande Avenue, Suite A, (PO Box 608) Charlotte Court House, Virginia, 23923.[16]

Sheriff

Royal Freeman (I) is the sheriff. The Sheriff is responsible for overseeing criminal investigations, calls for service, court room security, service of civil process and the operation of the Charlotte County jail.

Clerk of Court

The clerk is Nan R. Colley (I). The Charlotte County Clerk of the Circuit Court manages the records for the Judicial Circuit. In addition, Colley manages the records for the Judicial Circuit and serves as general record keeper for the county, recording all documents relating to land transfers, deeds, mortgages, wills, divorces and other statistics that date back to 1765.[17]

Commissioner of the Revenue

Naisha P. Carter (I) is the Commissioner of the Revenue.

Commonwealth's Attorney

William E. Green, Jr. (I) is the Commonwealth's Attorney, a position similar to that of District's Attorney in many other states.

Treasurer

Patricia P. Berkeley (I) is the Treasurer.

County Administrator

Charlotte County's administrator is Daniel Witt. Clark's duties include and are not limited to: general administration, personnel management and supervision of all county departments, budget preparation, funds management, purchasing, property management, compliance with laws, regulations and ordinances, coordination with independent agencies and the community, representing the Board at meetings and functions, and any and all other duties imposed by the Board and by law to facilitate the accomplishment of the work of county government.

Members of the School Board

Voter Registrar

Virginia Booth

United States presidential election results for Charlotte County, Virginia[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,815 61.62% 2,317 37.43% 59 0.95%
2016 3,479 59.91% 2,155 37.11% 173 2.98%
2012 3,311 56.14% 2,503 42.44% 84 1.42%
2008 3,372 54.77% 2,705 43.93% 80 1.30%
2004 3,166 58.22% 2,223 40.88% 49 0.90%
2000 2,855 57.17% 2,017 40.39% 122 2.44%
1996 2,103 45.58% 2,007 43.50% 504 10.92%
1992 2,293 44.86% 2,098 41.05% 720 14.09%
1988 2,699 57.44% 1,923 40.92% 77 1.64%
1984 2,999 61.76% 1,811 37.29% 46 0.95%
1980 2,322 51.26% 2,108 46.53% 100 2.21%
1976 2,023 46.04% 2,312 52.62% 59 1.34%
1972 2,501 66.22% 1,182 31.29% 94 2.49%
1968 1,042 24.43% 1,045 24.50% 2,178 51.07%
1964 1,974 62.11% 1,191 37.48% 13 0.41%
1960 867 32.90% 1,735 65.84% 33 1.25%
1956 791 27.86% 1,431 50.41% 617 21.73%
1952 949 36.56% 1,630 62.79% 17 0.65%
1948 285 17.10% 964 57.83% 418 25.07%
1944 356 19.45% 1,473 80.49% 1 0.05%
1940 251 14.58% 1,467 85.24% 3 0.17%
1936 190 9.89% 1,727 89.85% 5 0.26%
1932 169 11.44% 1,300 88.02% 8 0.54%
1928 403 26.60% 1,112 73.40% 0 0.00%
1924 154 12.38% 1,006 80.87% 84 6.75%
1920 364 22.28% 1,266 77.48% 4 0.24%
1916 227 20.79% 856 78.39% 9 0.82%
1912 175 19.06% 609 66.34% 134 14.60%


Communities

Towns

Unincorporated

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ "Charlotte County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c "Charlotte County: History". Charlotte County. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d Bailey, Annie Lou D. "History of Charlotte County; Sketch No.1". The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch. No. April 30, 1964. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  5. ^ Salmon, edited by Emily J.; Jr, Edward D.C. Campbell (1994). The Hornbook of Virginia History : a ready-reference guide to the Old Dominion's people, places, and past (4th ed.). Richmond: Library of Virginia. ISBN 0884901777. ((cite book)): |first1= has generic name (help)
  6. ^ "Biography of Patrick Henry". Red Hill Patrick Henry National Memorial. Archived from the original on July 27, 2013. Retrieved May 13, 2015.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  8. ^ Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A., eds. (1879). "Charlotte, a S. county of Virginia" . The American Cyclopædia.
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  13. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Charlotte County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  14. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Charlotte County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  16. ^ "Charlotte County - BOS Meetings, Minutes, & Public Hearings". www.charlotteva.com. Retrieved August 18, 2018.
  17. ^ "Charlotte County Circuit Court Clerk". www.charlotteva.com. Retrieved August 18, 2018.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 9, 2020.

Coordinates: 37°01′N 78°40′W / 37.01°N 78.66°W / 37.01; -78.66