Carroll County
Carroll County Courthouse and Confederate Monument
Carroll County Courthouse and Confederate Monument
Official seal of Carroll County
Map of Virginia highlighting Carroll County
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°44′N 80°44′W / 36.73°N 80.73°W / 36.73; -80.73
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded1842
Named forCharles Carroll
SeatHillsville
Largest townHillsville
Area
 • Total478 sq mi (1,240 km2)
 • Land475 sq mi (1,230 km2)
 • Water3 sq mi (8 km2)  0.6%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total29,155
 • Density61/sq mi (24/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district9th
Websitewww.carrollcountyva.org

Carroll County is a United States county located in the southwestern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Roughly one fifth of the county lies in the Virginia Piedmont region, while the rest is part of the Appalachian Mountains. The county seat and largest town is Hillsville.[1]

The county was established in 1842 from part of Grayson County, and was officially named in honor of Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The borders of Carroll County were later expanded by including land from Patrick County.

The total size of the county is 478 square miles (1,238 km2), and, as of the 2020 census, the population was 29,155.[2]

History

Charles Carroll of Carrollton, for whom the county was named
Charles Carroll of Carrollton, for whom the county was named

The first European settlers arrived in the region in the mid 18th century. These were primarily Scotch-Irish pioneers, who were used to high mountain altitudes. However, early settlement was slow, mostly due to the poor agricultural soil of the area. As a result, lead mining was one of the first economic activities in the region.[3]

As the area's population density increased, Carroll County was created in 1842 from part of Grayson County. The new county was officially named for Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, from Maryland.[4] However, other accounts assert that John Carroll, a Virginia state legislator, had named the county in his own honor, but was blocked by a political rival who had it officially named for Charles Carroll instead.[3][5]

Parts of Patrick County were added later to increase the size of Carroll County. The first piece was taken in 1845, and another part, which would later become the Fancy Gap District, was added in 1854.[3]

Geography

It is the only county in Virginia with Piedmont topography of roughly one fifth in the southeast part of the county and mountain topography of roughly four fifths elsewhere of the county. The Blue Ridge escarpment usually defines the county lines in both North Carolina and Virginia. The CDP community of Cana is in the Virginia Piedmont while the rest of the county is in the Appalachian Mountains.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 478 square miles (1,240 km2), of which 475 square miles (1,230 km2) is land and 3 square miles (7.8 km2) (0.6%) is water.[6]

Adjacent counties / Independent city

Protected areas

National

Other

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18505,909
18608,01235.6%
18709,14714.2%
188013,32345.7%
189015,49716.3%
190019,30324.6%
191021,1169.4%
192021,2830.8%
193022,1414.0%
194025,90417.0%
195026,6953.1%
196023,178−13.2%
197023,092−0.4%
198027,27018.1%
199026,594−2.5%
200029,24510.0%
201030,0422.7%
202029,155−3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010[11] 2020[12]

2020 census

Carroll County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[11] Pop 2020[12] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 28,820 27,040 95.93% 92.75%
Black or African American alone (NH) 177 163 0.59% 0.56%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 49 35 0.16% 0.12%
Asian alone (NH) 51 80 0.17% 0.27%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 5 3 0.02% 0.01%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 11 42 0.04% 0.14%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 153 750 0.51% 2.57%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 776 1,042 2.58% 3.57%
Total 30,042 29,155 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 29,245 people, 12,186 households, and 8,786 families residing in the county. The population density was 61 people per square mile (24/km2). There were 14,680 housing units at an average density of 31 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.97% White, 0.44% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.82% from other races, and 0.53% from two or more races. 1.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,186 households, out of which 27.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.70% were married couples living together, 8.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.80.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.10% under the age of 18, 7.20% from 18 to 24, 28.00% from 25 to 44, 26.70% from 45 to 64, and 17.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 97.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.10 males. The median income for a household in the county was $30,597, and the median income for a family was $36,755. Males had a median income of $25,907 versus $19,697 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,475. About 8.70% of families and 12.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.70% of those under age 18 and 14.10% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics

Carroll County, like neighboring Floyd, is a historical anomaly in being a solidly Republican county in “Solid South” Virginia, due to desertions from the Confederate army during the Civil War. It was the only county in Virginia to vote for William Howard Taft during the 1912 election, and the only Democrat to carry the county in a presidential election since 1896 has been Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932.[14] Since 1980 no Democrat has gained forty percent of the county's vote, and even with Virginian Tim Kaine on the ticket, Hillary Clinton gained less than twenty percent in the 2016 election. Democratic Senatorial candidate Mark Warner did however carry Carroll County in his landslide 2008 victory.

United States presidential election results for Carroll County, Virginia[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 12,659 80.88% 2,842 18.16% 150 0.96%
2016 10,663 78.09% 2,559 18.74% 433 3.17%
2012 8,736 67.63% 3,685 28.53% 497 3.85%
2008 8,187 65.08% 4,109 32.67% 283 2.25%
2004 8,173 67.39% 3,888 32.06% 67 0.55%
2000 7,142 64.92% 3,638 33.07% 221 2.01%
1996 5,088 51.04% 3,611 36.22% 1,270 12.74%
1992 5,664 51.89% 3,790 34.72% 1,461 13.39%
1988 6,377 66.17% 3,190 33.10% 70 0.73%
1984 7,056 70.26% 2,914 29.02% 72 0.72%
1980 5,905 61.29% 3,437 35.68% 292 3.03%
1976 4,820 53.75% 4,010 44.71% 138 1.54%
1972 5,247 75.08% 1,583 22.65% 159 2.28%
1968 4,909 64.16% 1,773 23.17% 969 12.67%
1964 3,617 58.85% 2,517 40.95% 12 0.20%
1960 3,705 66.29% 1,873 33.51% 11 0.20%
1956 4,060 69.66% 1,739 29.84% 29 0.50%
1952 3,774 68.68% 1,711 31.14% 10 0.18%
1948 2,456 65.72% 1,196 32.00% 85 2.27%
1944 2,352 63.07% 1,375 36.87% 2 0.05%
1940 1,835 54.19% 1,546 45.66% 5 0.15%
1936 3,245 60.45% 2,122 39.53% 1 0.02%
1932 1,461 48.28% 1,537 50.79% 28 0.93%
1928 2,459 68.76% 1,117 31.24% 0 0.00%
1924 1,743 57.79% 1,257 41.68% 16 0.53%
1920 2,520 66.47% 1,265 33.37% 6 0.16%
1916 1,424 62.40% 858 37.60% 0 0.00%
1912 874 43.96% 765 38.48% 349 17.56%

Board of Supervisors

Constitutional officers

Carroll County is represented by William M. “Bill” Stanley (Republican) and David R. Suetterlein (Republican) in the Virginia Senate, Jeffrey L. Campbell (Republican) in the Virginia House of Delegates, Tim Kaine (Democrat) and Mark Warner (Democrat) in the U.S. Senate, and Morgan Griffith (Republican) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Education

Public high schools

Carroll County High School, in Hillsville, serves the county. Home of the Cavaliers, CCHS is a 9-12 comprehensive high school. The school was created by the consolidation of Woodlawn High School (Woodlawn, Virginia) and Hillsville High School (Hillsville, Virginia).

Communities

Town

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ "Carroll County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c Willis, Ninevah. "A Brief History Of Carroll County, Virginia". The Journal of Mountain Life (October, 1984). Retrieved March 20, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 70.
  5. ^ Tennis, Joe (2004). Southwest Virginia Crossroads: An Almanac of Place Names and Places to See. Johnson City, Tenn.: Overmountain Press. p. 91. ISBN 978-1570722561.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  11. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Carroll County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  12. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Carroll County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  14. ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, pp. 323, 326, 329 ISBN 0786422173
  15. ^ David Leip. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 9, 2020.

Coordinates: 36°44′N 80°44′W / 36.73°N 80.73°W / 36.73; -80.73