The concentration camps in the Independent State of Croatia are marked 1 through 40 on this map of concentration camps in Yugoslavia in World War II. The two camps in annexed territories are marked 54 and 55.
The concentration camps in the Independent State of Croatia are marked 1 through 40 on this map of concentration camps in Yugoslavia in World War II. The two camps in annexed territories are marked 54 and 55.

During World War II, numerous concentration camps existed in the Independent State of Croatia. Most of them were operated by the Croatian Ustaša authorities, but some of them were operated by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy.[1]

Ustaša-operated camps

Camp Location Operational number of prisoners number of deaths
Jasenovac (I–IV) Jasenovac, Slavonia 23 August 1941 – 22 April 1945 100,000+ c. 100,000[Note 1]
Stara Gradiška (Jasenovac V) Stara Gradiška, Slavonia 1941–1945 12,790+ 9,586+
Đakovo Đakovo, Slavonia 1 December 1941 – 7 July 1942 3,000 at least 516 or 650
Tenja Tenja, Osijek, Slavonia March 1942–August 1942 3,000 Jews
Sisak Sisak, Banovina August 1942–January 1943 6,693 children, mostly Serbs at least 1152 or 1630
Gospić Gospić, Lika June–August 1941[2] 42,246[3]
Jadovno Gospić, Lika 1941–August 1941[4] 10,000–68,000
Lepoglava Lepoglava, northern Croatia 1941–1945 2,000+ political at least 961 youngsters and 80 other inmates
Danica Koprivnica, northern Croatia 15 April 1941–July 1941[5] 5,600
Lobor Lobor, northern Croatia 9 August 1941–November 1942 2,000+ women and children, mostly Jews and Serbs 200+
Kerestinec Kerestinec, Zagreb 1941–1945
Jastrebarsko Jastrebarsko, Zagreb 1942– 1,500 children [6]
Slana Pag, Dalmatia June 1941–August 1941[7] 16,000 4–12,000 or 8,500
Metajna Pag, Dalmatia 1941–1945
Kruščica (Vitez) Vitez, central Bosnia 1941–Late September 1941[8] 3000
Gornja Rijeka Gornja Rijeka, northern Croatia 1941–1942 400+ at least 140

German-operated camps

Italian-operated camps

In annexed territories

See also

Notes

  1. ^ These numbers vary widely, and were frequently manipulated by various sides during Yugoslavia's history, see Jasenovac concentration camp.

References

  1. ^ "Camps in the Independent State of Croatia". Jasenovac Memorial Area. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
  2. ^ Radovi (Filozofski Fakultet Zagreb. Humanisticke i Drustvene Znanosti). Zavod. 2007. Veći koncentracijski logor bio je Gospić (lipanj - kolovoz 1941)...
  3. ^ Israeli, Raphael (4 March 2013). The Death Camps of Croatia: Visions and Revisions, 1941-1945. Transaction Publishers. p. 77. ISBN 978-1-4128-4930-2.
  4. ^ Hilberg 2003, p. 760.
  5. ^ Hilberg 2003, p. 759: "Surviving inmates transferred to Jadovno"
  6. ^ Rade Šegrt. "Prvi put obilježeno stradanje djece". Nezavisne novine. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  7. ^ Hilberg 2003, p. 759: "Closed August 1941, when the Italians occupied the island. Men were sent on to Jadovno, women to Kruščica"
  8. ^ Hilberg 2003, p. 760: "Surviving inmates to Jasenovac"

Sources

Books
Journals
Conference papers and proceedings