Lego Znap
Lego Znap (logo).png
Lego Znap's logo
SubjectWire-frame sets
Licensed fromThe Lego Group
Availability1998 (1998)–1999 (1999)
Total sets19[1]
A 38cm (15") wide ball made from Znap.
A 38cm (15") wide ball made from Znap.
A bridge made from Znap.
A bridge made from Znap.

Znap was a Lego theme that was launched in 1998. It was similar to K'nex and could be used to construct a variety of structures. It moved away from the traditional system of Lego construction and did not gain popularity. The product line was discontinued in 1999.

Release

Znap was launched in 1998. The pieces were more complex than traditional Lego bricks, which allowed for more complicated architectural creations. The product line aimed to rival a similar construction toy named K'Nex, but did not gain popularity and was discontinued in 1999. Lego Znap was launched at a time in the late 1990s, when The Lego Group was experiencing financial problems, caused by several factors, including infrastructure expansion and an unmanageable increase in the number of produced parts with little gain in sales. Znap is listed by Business Insider as one of several product lines launched during this period "that almost ruined the company."[2]

Description

Lego Znap was a building system that could be snapped together in a flexible way to create structures such as bridges. The parts were produced in a series of bright colours.[3]

Construction sets

According to Bricklink, Lego Znap released 19 sets.[1]

1998 sets

1999 sets

Reception

Znap is one of several Lego product lines with alternative building systems that have been rejected by some Adult Fans of Lego (AFOL) as "impure" and "not Lego".[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Feloni, Richard. "These Are The Disastrous Lego Kits That Almost Ruined The Company". Business Insider. Retrieved 2021-08-09.
  2. ^ Herman, Sarah (2012-07-09). Building a History: The Lego Group. Grub Street Publishers. p. 184. ISBN 978-1-78340-804-7.
  3. ^ Belk, Russell W.; Llamas, Rosa (2013-05-07). The Routledge Companion to Digital Consumption. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-136-25336-2.