Phi Sigma Nu
ΦΣΝ
Phi Sigma Nu Fraternity crest.jpg
FoundedFebruary 13, 1996; 26 years ago (1996-02-13)
University of North Carolina at Pembroke, U.S.
TypeSocial
AffiliationIndependent
ScopeArizona, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Kansas and New Hampshire
Mission statementTo empower Native Men to collectively engage in academic, social, cultural and physical realms to promote and inspire growth in tribal families, tribal communities, the United States of America and the world at large.
MottoMen of Valor. Men of Pride
Colors  Red,   Yellow,   Black and   White
SymbolSnapping Turtle
PublicationWarrior's Words
Chapters7
HeadquartersPembroke, North Carolina
USA
WebsitePhi Sigma Nu website

Phi Sigma Nu (ΦΣΝ) is the oldest and largest Native American fraternity in the United States. It was founded in 1996 in North Carolina.

History

Phi Sigma Nu is a Native American fraternity founded on February 13, 1996 at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.[1][2] It is the first national Native American Indian fraternity to be formed in the United States.[1][2]

The Fraternity is governed by a National Chief Council, an elected body of national officers presided over by a Chief President. The current Chief President is Dr. Lawrence T. Locklear.[3][4]

Traditions

The Mission Statement of Phi Sigma Nu is:

We, the Brothers of Phi Sigma Nu, empower Native Men to collectively engage in academic, social, cultural and physical realms to promote and inspire growth in tribal families, tribal communities, the United States of America and the world at large.

The Motto of Phi Sigma Nu is "Men of Valor. Men of Pride."

The Fraternity's seven founding Principles are:[4]

The fraternity uses no alcohol in its ceremonies or initiation, as these ceremonies are viewed as a purifying processes.[1]

The Fraternity is recognized by the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors.[5]

As of August 29, 2020 the Fraternity reports it has more than 400 brothers representing more than 55 tribes.[6]

Chapters

Expanding into multiple states, Phi Sigma Nu numbers 12 chapters, including three active provisional chapters. Additionally the Fraternity recognizes three professional chapters. Active chapters in bold, inactive chapters in italics.[7]

Name Chartered Institution Location Status Notes Reference
Alpha February 13, 1996 University of North Carolina at Pembroke Pembroke, North Carolina Active
Beta April 18, 2001 North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina Active
Gamma October 31, 2003 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, North Carolina Active
Delta April 2, 2006 Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma Active
Epsilon April 22, 2006 Northeastern State University Tahlequah, Oklahoma Active
Zeta November 1, 2007 Arizona State University Phoenix, Arizona Active
Eta University of North Carolina at Charlotte Charlotte, North Carolina Provisional (inactive)
Theta New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico Provisional (inactive)
Iota April 1, 2014 Haskell Indian Nations University Lawrence, Kansas Active
Kappa Dartmouth College Hanover, New Hampshire Provisional
Lambda Southeastern Oklahoma State University Durant, Oklahoma Provisional
St. Gregory's University St. Gregory's University Shawnee, Oklahoma Provisional

Professional Chapters
The Fraternity provides for alumni and volunteer networking after graduation with "Professional Chapters" that are formed to provide local alumni support of campus chapters.

Name Chartered Institution Location Status Notes Reference
Nu Alpha December 15, 2007 North Carolina Active
Nu Beta Kansas Provisional
Nu Gamma Oklahoma Provisional

References

  1. ^ a b c Torbenson, Craig LaRon; Parks, Gregory (2009). Brothers and Sisters: Diversity in College Fraternities and Sororities. Associated University Presses. pp. 133–156. ISBN 0838641946.
  2. ^ a b Barnett, George A. (2011). Encyclopedia of Social Networks, Volume 1. Sage. p. 298. ISBN 1412979110.
  3. ^ ΦΣΝ Warrior's Words, from the national website, accessed 7 Nov 2020.
  4. ^ a b As noted on the PSN National Website, accessed 7 Nov 2020.
  5. ^ "Special Interest Fraternities & Sororities". Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2012.
  6. ^ Press Release, 2020 annual meeting, accessed 7 Nov 2020.
  7. ^ ΦΣΝ Chapter list, from the national website, accessed 7 Nov 2020.

See also