RD-9
Preserved Tumansky RD-9B turbojet engine
Type Turbojet
Manufacturer Tumansky
First run 1953
Major applications Yak-25
MiG-19

The Tumansky RD-9 (initially designated Mikulin AM-5) was an early Soviet turbojet engine, not based on pre-existing German or British designs. The AM-5, developed by scaling down the AM-3,[1] was available in 1952 and completed testing in 1953; it produced 25.5 kN (5,700 lbf) thrust without afterburner. The AM-5 engine is notable for making possible the first mass-produced supersonic interceptors such as the MiG-19, and the first Soviet all-weather area interceptor, the Yak-25.[2] When Sergei Tumansky replaced Alexander Mikulin as the OKB-24's chief designer in 1956, the engine was renamed RD-9.[citation needed] The engine was later built under license in China as the WP-6.

Variants and applications

A BAF FT-6's Wopen WP-6A turbojet engines on display at Bangabandhu Military Museum, Bangladesh
RD-9A
RD-9B
Used in the East German civilian jetliner project Baade 152 in 1958 and 1959, replaced when Pirna 014 engines became available.
RD-9AK
Non-afterburning versions for the Yak-25 and Yak-26.
RD-9AF-300
Afterburning version for the Yak-27 and Yak-28.
RD-9AF2-300
Afterburning version for the Yak-27 and Yak-28.
RD-9B
Afterburning version for the early variants of MiG-19.
RD-9BK
Version for Lavochkin La-17M.
RD-9BF-811
Afterburning version for the later variants of MiG-19.
RD-9V
Afterburning version used in the Ilyushin Il-40P.
WP-6
Chinese built version for the Shenyang J-6.
WP-6A
a Chinese upgraded version for the Nanchang Q-5 and J-6C.
WP-6Z
further developed for the cancelled Nanchang J-12
NK-TJ
[i] North Korean version built for MiG-19 and Shenyang J-6[3]

Specifications (RD-9BF-811)

Data from [4][5]

General characteristics

Components

Performance

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See also

Comparable engines

Related lists

Notes

  1. ^ designation is just a placeholder

See also

References

  1. ^ Belyakov, R.A.; Marmain, J. (1991). MiG 1939-1989. Paris: Editions Larivière. p. 137. ISBN 2-907051-00-8.
  2. ^ Leonard, Barry (January 2011). History of Strategic and Ballistic Missile Defense: Volume II. DIANE Publishing. p. 245. ISBN 9781437921311.
  3. ^ "북한의 무인기 Mm-1".
  4. ^ "Mikulin AM-5 / Tumansky RD-9 / Wopen WP-6".
  5. ^ "Турбореактивный двигатель РД-9".
  • The Osprey Encyclopedia of Russian Aircraft: 1875-1995, Bill Gunston, ISBN 1-85532-405-9.