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Black Order
Black Order.jpg
Thanos and the original five Black Order members on the cover of Thanos: A God Up There Listening #3 (December 2014).
Art by Dustin Nguyen.
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceCameo appearance: The New Avengers #8 (September 2013)
Full appearance: Infinity #1 (October 2013)
Created byJonathan Hickman
Mike Deodato
In-story information
Base(s)Knowhere
Member(s)Thanos
Black Dwarf
Corvus Glaive
Ebony Maw
Proxima Midnight
Supergiant
Black Swan

The Black Order is a supervillain team appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. They are a group of alien warriors with various supernatural abilities who serve Thanos. The original iteration, introduced in the 2013 Infinity storyline following a cameo appearance in The New Avengers #8 (September 2013), consists of Ebony Maw, Corvus Glaive, Proxima Midnight, Black Dwarf, and Supergiant, with Black Swan later joining the group as well.

The Black Order have been adapted from the comics into several other forms of media, such as animated television series and video games. The group (renamed the "Children of Thanos") made their live-action debut in the Marvel Cinematic Universe film Avengers: Infinity War (2018). Alternate versions of the Children of Thanos later appeared in the film Avengers: Endgame (2019) and the animated Disney+ series What If...? (2021).

Fictional team biography

Thanos' version

The Black Order is a group of ruthless aliens that serve Thanos. They help Thanos raze worlds from which they demand tribute. When Corvus Glaive sent one of their Outriders to find a new world to raze, the Outrider targeted Earth.[1]

The Black Order arrive on Earth in search of the Infinity Gems, which are under the control of the Illuminati.[2] Each member of the Order targets a member of the Illuminati with varying degrees of success. During their search for the gems, Ebony Maw finds Thanos' son, Thane, whom Thanos wishes to kill.[3]

During a battle with the Avengers, Black Dwarf and Supergiant are killed, while Ebony Maw betrays Thanos and frees Thane. Thane traps Thanos, Corvus Glaive, and Proxima Midnight in an amber construct which leaves them in a state of "living death."[4]

While Thanos was imprisoned in the Triskelion, a mysterious cloaked figure offered to help him obtain the Mjolnir of Earth-1610.[5] Thanos accepted the deal. To ensure success, Thanos formed a second incarnation of the Black Order with Proxima Midnight and Black Swan of Earth-1365. He dispatched them to the Collector's ship in order to obtain the Mjolnir of Earth-1610.[6] There, the trio battled Thor and Beta Ray Bill and failed in retrieving the hammer.[7] Upon returning to Thanos, the cloaked figure revealed herself to be the Asgardian Death Goddess Hela who then brutally killed both Black Swan and Proxima Midnight to demonstrate her power. She told Thanos that she needed his help to reclaim her rulership of Hel and offered to grant him the death he has long been seeking in exchange. They then kiss in a passionate embrace.[8]

After Gamora killed Thanos,[9] Hela and the Black Order, using Knowhere as their ship, stole Thanos' body from Starfox, for Hela to resurrect him.[10] After getting the head from Annihilus, the Black Order went to Eros, revealed as the consciousness of Thanos in the body of his brother, planning to return to his own body.[11]

Corvus Glaive's version

After the restructuring of the multiverse, when Thanos was missing, Corvus Glaive gathered the worst criminals in the universe in a second version of the Black Order, as part of his plan to create his own empire. Using a moon called the Black Quadrant that belonged to Thanos, Corvus Glaive and the Black Order began to conquer different planets. When Thanos returned, he broke the blade off of Corvus Glaive's pike. Rather than die at the hands of Thanos, Corvus Glaive took the broken blade and killed himself. Afterwards, Thanos reclaimed the Black Quadrant.[12]

Challenger's version

During the "No Surrender" arc, the Black Order was reorganized with Ebony Maw and Black Swan with Corvus Glaive, Proxima Midnight, and Black Dwarf back from the dead while Supergiant is alive as a psychic projection. Earth was stolen from where it used to be the battleground for the Black Order's fight with an alien version of the Lethal Legion that was formed by Grandmaster.[13] It was revealed that this Black Order was formed by the Challenger who is an old rival of Grandmaster.[14] After the Avengers put an end to the contest, the Black Order regroups on the planet Angargal. They are approached by Grandmaster who had an offer for them.[15]

Members

Thanos' first version

Corvus Glaive's version

Thanos' second version

Challenger's version

In other media

Television

Marvel Cinematic Universe

Main article: Children of Thanos

The Black Order, barring Supergiant and alternatively referred to as the "Children of Thanos", appear in media set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, with Ebony Maw voiced and motion-captured by Tom Vaughan-Lawlor; Black Dwarf (renamed Cull Obsidian) voiced and motion-captured by Terry Notary; Proxima Midnight voiced and facial-captured by Carrie Coon, with motion capture primarily provided by stuntwoman Monique Ganderton;[20] and Corvus Glaive voiced and motion-captured by Michael James Shaw.[21] Directors Joe and Anthony Russo took several creative liberties with the group's depiction, altering their abilities and most notably excluding Supergiant for "consolidation".[22]

Video games

Collected editions

Title Material collected Published date ISBN
Black Order: The Warmasters of Thanos Black Order #1-5 April 2019 978-1302915858

References

  1. ^ Free Comic Book Day 2013 Infinity. Marvel Comics.
  2. ^ The New Avengers vol. 3 #8. Marvel Comics.
  3. ^ The New Avengers vol. 3 #11. Marvel Comics.
  4. ^ Infinity #6. Marvel Comics.
  5. ^ The Unworthy Thor #2. Marvel Comics.
  6. ^ The Unworthy Thor #3. Marvel Comics.
  7. ^ The Unworthy Thor #4
  8. ^ a b The Unworthy Thor #5. Marvel Comics.
  9. ^ Infinity Wars Prime #1. Marvel Comics.
  10. ^ Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 5 #1. Marvel Comics.
  11. ^ Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 5 #4-5. Marvel Comics.
  12. ^ a b Thanos vol. 2 #1. Marvel Comics.
  13. ^ The Avengers #676-677. Marvel Comics.
  14. ^ The Avengers #678. Marvel Comics.
  15. ^ The Avengers #690. Marvel Comics.
  16. ^ Avengers vol. 5 #23. Marvel Comics.
  17. ^ Sunu, Steve (May 6, 2013). "EXCLUSIVE: Introducing the Generals of Marvel's "Infinity"". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  18. ^ "New Frontiers". Avengers Assemble. Season 2. Episode 25. September 13, 2015. Disney XD.
  19. ^ "Avengers World". Avengers Assemble. Season 2. Episode 26. September 20, 2015. Disney XD.
  20. ^ Fullerton, Huwav (April 16, 2018). "Fargo's Carrie Coon to play crucial Avengers: Infinity War villain". Radio Times. Archived from the original on April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  21. ^ Esienberg, Eric (April 22, 2018). "We Know Who Is Playing Corvus Glaive In Avengers: Infinity War". Cinema Blend. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  22. ^ Busch, Jenna (July 22, 2017). "Infinity War Director Joe Russo Talks The Black Order at Comic-Con". ComingSoon.net. Archived from the original on July 23, 2017. Retrieved July 23, 2017.
  23. ^ Thompson, Luke Y. (July 15, 2017). "Avengers: Infinity War's Children of Thanos (Black Order) Were Just Unveiled at D23". Nerdist Industries. Archived from the original on March 30, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  24. ^ Russo, Anthony; Russo, Joe (Directors) (2019). Avengers: Endgame (Motion picture). Marvel Studios.
  25. ^ Staff (March 21, 2016). "MARVEL FUTURE FIGHT THANOS' BLACK ORDER TRAILER". Cosmic Book News. Retrieved August 27, 2017.